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crestedgex1
11-07-2004, 10:43 PM
I had a bad time with carrion gnats coming in with crickets orders. carrion gnats are the ones that the magots eat live and dead crickets they are also prolific and spread thruogh your house in the garbage etc. bad bad news. the only way to stop the problem is BUY OFF A GOOD CRICKET SUPPLIER AND KEEP YOUR CRICKETS CLEAN.
JEFF

11-08-2004, 09:59 AM
that is sick , pesty gnats

miguel camacho!
12-05-2004, 11:32 PM
oh man, for some stupid reason i thought i was the only one suffering from gnats. luckily, since i usually get my crickets from the local pet shop, i dont get any gnats from that. but i've still got these extremely tiny gnats that flourish on what seems like substrate alone. i have even noticed these flourishing in potted plants. i eventually just leared to cope with them. i figured there must not be any way that i can easily take care of them. is there?!?!

crestedgex1
12-12-2004, 10:15 PM
I found that keeping the crickets clean is a good why to keep them away.........another way is the use mantella and poison arrow frogs they love them the natural way is always better.
JEFF

crestedgex1
12-12-2004, 10:15 PM
I found that keeping the crickets clean is a good why to keep them away.........another way is the use mantella and poison arrow frogs they love them the natural way is always better.
JEFF

miguel camacho!
01-12-2005, 12:17 AM
i just picked up a tiny greenhouse frog while i was in florida, and i've been testing him out in one of my setups. he keeps well hidden, and he's been gobbling down the springtails and tiny flies. im a little reluctant to try dart frogs mainly because they stand out and i thought they normally get a lil bigger than the greenhouse frogs. anyhow, this spring and summer i plan on trying to get some tiny frogs from my back yard and using them as tiny big control in some of my tanks.

crestedgex1
01-21-2005, 11:29 AM
In my one set up I use for Uroplatus ebenaui and painted mantellas. the mantellas love the gnats and keep them in check. Small frogs are the best natural way to control pesty gnats.
Jeff

Protean
01-16-2006, 08:08 AM
Whats this about greenhouse frogs? Mike you still have it? send me a photo of it. I am curious to see what it looks like.

BTW, I haven't sent the crystals. I'll take care of it today.

Jason

miguel camacho!
01-26-2006, 08:39 PM
sorry i missed this post jason. yeah, i brought some more greenhouse frogs back from my last trip to try them out some more. they stay too well-hidden for me to see if their bellies are keeping full though. adults are only about 2-3 cm in length, and they're pretty stealthy. heres a closeup of one.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a185/miguelcamacho/greenhouse.jpg

Dragonflames81
02-11-2006, 07:57 PM
hey mike do any of your animals but the frogs, my gnats are getting worse and I dont know why. I haven't been feeding crickets to much because of that, I just go to the store and pick some up so I don't have them the way I did when I was getting orders of them. Cause if those frogs are working good I might be looking into those guys to help me out some.

miguel camacho!
02-11-2006, 11:45 PM
the frogs work ok, they definitely dont cull the situation entirely though.

your best bet is to let the surface of the substrate get dry. what substrate are you using, and how many tanks are we talkin about?

Dragonflames81
02-12-2006, 12:38 PM
right now I have 8, with eco earth, all adults. My house is so dry that I use this stuff to help me with the humidity. My guys where having some shedding issues when I was using newspaper, so then I went to paper towels but that didnt help much so I went to the eco earth and I haven't had any shed issues, just gnats.

thrower
04-04-2006, 04:14 PM
I have had problems in the past with the fungus gnats, and I think that some of the comments about keeping dead crickets and feces out of the substrate, and letting the substrate dry out some helps a lot. I also had a few other things that tended to help. First if you have nocturnal animals that don't move during the day, like uroplatus, then you can use those glue type traps and just set them near the light for several hours during the brightest part of the day. This manages to get rid of quite a few of the adults, with little chance that you'll get a stuck animal. Another thing I try to do is mix up the substrate on a pretty regular basis. It seems that the gnats tend to spawn in the wettest part of the cage(along the walls), so if you kind of turn the soil so to speak, they get moved to drier, or deeper locations that prevent them from hatching correctly. The other thing I tried was Gnatrol, a solution of some soil organisms that attack the digestive tract of the gnat larvae. For this I took the geckos out and sprayed the solution on the substrate a couple times a day for a few days. I then rinsed with some clean water and covered the substrate with a thin layer of fresh. I'm not sure if the organisms are capable of affecting geckos, so I didn't want to take any chances. I did this about 6 months ago, and all of the geckos, and tree frog are still alive, as well as the first 4 eggs that hatched. I have only seen a couple of gnats (6 or so) in the last 6 months, so I think that some combination of these has helped me out.

Tarl

Bowfinger
07-09-2006, 08:07 PM
I have had some problems since I work with mostly tropical species that need moisture all the time. After reading Tari's post I picked up some fly sticky traps for the outside of my cages and a couple "The Pantry Pest Trap"s. I made the holes smaller on those with packing tape and set them in the worst cages. I will let you know how they work out.
One thing I noticed was these flys or whatever they are make it from cage to cage, and this concerns me of the possibility of spreading other problems just like mites have done, so I decided to stop "living with them" to eleminate any potential problems.

WildEyeReptiles
07-09-2006, 09:26 PM
Shane, your cages are probably too wet. Gnats and such are classic indicators of this.

Bowfinger
07-09-2006, 09:55 PM
I try to keep it about as moist as I would keep eggs for incubation, as I am not very good at finding eggs right away. I will try to let some of the cages with the worst infestations dry a little. I think my bigest problem cage, and where they tend to survive after cleaning all cages out is in with my marginata cage. I am thinking this has a lot to do with feeding the baby food, and them spilling the bowl once in a while?, besides the moisture. The cages that get the problem usually are the ones in that same rack.
The one thing that got me pooring a little extra water was my ficus showing signs of drying out...but any how I will keep an eye on how much water I am using and see if that helps.

WildEyeReptiles
07-09-2006, 11:09 PM
Another thing you can try, although if you arent with permanent soil, this is less effective - is using pill bugs and springtails. They dont kill the gnats, but they out-compete them and as an added bonus, are edible and also good food sources for animals small enough to venture a bite.

Pink_Gecko
07-13-2006, 08:31 PM
I was wondering what these things were!I recently got in a huge order of crickets and among them were this tiny black flies and they were everywhere!It grossed me out.But now I know what they are and what I can do!

Bowfinger
07-13-2006, 08:33 PM
I am sure there are many types of flies, wasps or whatever looking very similar with different concerns deppending on where you are from.

WildEyeReptiles
07-14-2006, 09:41 AM
The flies that came with your crickets are not fungus gnats, they are phorid flies and are a completely different pest.

Nathan Hall
07-14-2006, 02:15 PM
All you've ever wanted to know about the most evil little insect on the planet:

:evil: http://www.pestproducts.com/phoridfly.htm :evil:

I have to deal with phorid flies every summer. :evil:

Pink_Gecko
07-14-2006, 09:31 PM
Ok...so what is a carrion gnat?What do they look like?

I am going to the link now,so if they are mentioned there...ignore this!! :D

Nathan Hall
07-18-2006, 05:07 PM
The most common flying insects in herp enclosures, cricket bins, etc. are phorid flies, fungus gnats, and fruit flies. I never really have any problems with the latter two. I think that when most folks talk about "carrion gnats" they mean phorid flies.

Bowfinger
07-30-2006, 07:07 PM
I noticed some of my ficus getting white fungus looking stuff on the base and some of them die back and one has died off. This includes a couple drier cages so I don't associate it with being too wet. I am getting rid of the flies and cleaning the cages out very well including washing these plants and removing dead or "fungus infected" branches.
Anyone have a recomendation of what this really is and is there a gecko safe spray for this etc, help me please.

I posted on this thread since I was thinking the spread of this might be associated with the flies