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Indomitus
11-19-2005, 10:52 PM
Hi all. I didn't know where to put this, so mods, feel free to move it if you want. I'm really new to Geckos, and I am looking for some advice. I have a vivarium in my apartment, and its a good sub-tropical or tropical set up using a standard 20 gallon aquarium. The reason I already have the set up is because I originally had a tadpole that was going to go in there, and he unfortunately died. So here's my question, what kind of Gecko would be best for a beginner for my set-up. Looking through the book I picked up today, the Fat Tailed Geckos caught my eye, but I haven't had a chance to do more than page through that section yet. Any thoughts and advice is very welcome. Thanks.

bleeding_sarcasm
11-20-2005, 07:54 PM
well you have to be slightly more descriptive of what your viv entails. what are the tempuratures? what kind of plants to you have in it? what kind of humidity do you maintain? do you have florescent lighting over it? how much are you willing to do as far as feeding? there are alot of factors that go into get animals. afts are great, they do well in planted tanks, however, they demand a pretty hot basking, so alot of plants arent going to do well in a tank that hot. also, a 20 isnt that big, so i dont you think you could do more then 2 in there, maybe 3 at the most, if you wanted to get into a group. figure out what you have, and what animals youre interested, and what it takes to keep them, then decide what youre willing to do as far as changing what youve got [if you have to]. i would say all reptiles need a basking of some sort. good luck tho, and id like to see some pics if youve got them.

Indomitus
11-22-2005, 12:17 AM
This is why I'm asking questions first. I am flexible on most everything too, I want to do things right. The temperature is going to be room temperature. Though that also brings up another question, a heating rock would be a good idea right? Humidity will probably be fairly low depending on the lid. If I use the standard plastic light/hood I know it can be quite a bit more humid, I also have an extra screen lid that I can use, though then the viv. will be rather dry. As far as feeding goes, I'm willing to go with crickets plus with the calcium supplements, plus the occasional mealworm or some such as a treat. I do have a question about feeding though too, are earthworms ok? We don't have many farms around here or insecticides that the earthworms could pick up, but I'm just wondering if they're ok as a treat like the mealworms. I only want 1 gecko right now. I'll try to get a picture of the viv. sometime, I only have my webcam here at my apartment, so it wont be the best, but what can you do? The plants, right now I just have a little bamboo stalk in there, and I have my eye on some other plants too, though I will have to get the types for you because I don't have the names handy. I appreciate all the advice I can get. Thanks!

klondike4001
11-22-2005, 12:59 AM
You'd have top decide on what type of gecko you want, because a heating rock is a bad idea for most geckos. What is your room temperature? Does it fluctuate during the day? You can use the screen lid (good for ventilation) but misting will need to be done too keep the humidity up. Are you planning on incandescent or flourescent lighting? The earth worms shouldn't be a problem as garbage men, not food, get a picture up and start narrowing down your ideas on a species to purchase.

bleeding_sarcasm
11-22-2005, 01:03 AM
cresteds are arborial, so they wouldnt use a heat rock, and thats the closest thing you can get to being able to keep at "room temperature" even tho i totally dissagree with that. also, they need serious humidity, so youd have to spray it heavily once a day or lightly twice a day. and they eat fruit too, not just crickets. uh.. you cant have a leopard gecko, because they need a basking of 90, all the time. the only thing ive fed earth worms to is my box turtle. fat tails need alot of humidity, AND a basking of 90. both of which you cannot provide with your current set up. pothos are a good plant for starters, next to impossible to kill, do well in high temps [up to 80, so you wouldnt put it DIRECTLY under the basking] and theyre really cheap. if you keep a fat tail dry, it will loose all of its toes due to stuck shed. if you keep a fat tail, or any reptile, too cold, it will die, because its body will shut down and it wont eat. those are kind of the top 3 "starter" geckos to get into. sorry this isnt particularly helpful, but i thought id give you a heads up.

DeadIrishD
11-22-2005, 01:18 AM
:( I had two pothos and killed them both LOL.
if you buy a small heat lamp, (that doesn't give off to much heat.) you maybe better off to go with cresteds.

If you do decide to keep an AFT, and keep it well taking care of they'll reward you alot, as they can be quite docile and are gorgious, not to mention their hunting displays are to cute. (they raise their tail up, and shake it like a morocca.)

eww... crickets I'll soon be getting some dubia (roaches.) but crix are good too, if you can stand them.

bleeding_sarcasm
11-22-2005, 02:34 AM
we just started breeding our roaches. :) uh... as long as you spray the pothos every time you spray the cage, water it weekly, and have a flo light over head, theyre hardy and make great cuttings. if you add a heat lamp or a heat pad [whatever it takes for you to get up to 90 on one side of the cage], you can keep an AFT. cresteds need high humidity also tho, require you feed them 2 different things [crickets and fruit] so if youre going to get a heat lamp, youre better off going with a leopard gecko. they can deal with it dry, no plants, and only eating crickets and the occasional meal worm.

DeadIrishD
11-22-2005, 05:42 PM
:) so I take it, you cannot stand crix either eh?
who'd you get them from, if you dont mind me asking?

Lordoftheswarms
03-14-2010, 10:46 AM
:( I had two pothos and killed them both LOL.


How the heck did you manage that? I left my pothos in the bathroom without any light, and mostly without water for 8 months, and it survived.