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View Full Version : P. hasselquistii eggs



Kevin McRae
07-17-2006, 09:30 AM
Hi, I read somewhere that fan foot geckos will not destory/eat their eggs or babies, is this true? I had success keeping my G. vittiaus eggs with the parents and they hatched fine, then removed. I know there different species but will/can it work the same? Anyone here have any personal experience with keeping eggs/hatchlings in with the parents?

Thanks. Pics to come. Smile

geckoboy
07-17-2006, 01:05 PM
Hey Kevin,
I've had good luck leaving the eggs in situ to hatch. Hatch success rate seems to drop when incubated outside the cage (not sure why). The parents will not eat the babies but it could just be that I've got enough small crevices in the rockwork that the babies just hide before they get eaten. I remove the babies once I spot the hatched eggs as they will need a smaller food source than what I offer the parents. I do not keep the babies on sand until about 6months old...everytime I've tried they don't make it past about 2 weeks. Papertowel works well but keep 1 or 2 good sized rocks in the cage as they will use them all the time...it seems like it makes them feel more secure.
Hope that helps. Ask me again if you need more...it's been so many years that I've got a method for the whole process :)
Nathan

Kevin McRae
07-17-2006, 02:59 PM
Thanks Nathan. :) The parents have been guarding the eggs, which is nice to see.

I plan on keeping the hatchlings in small Critter Keepers (worked well for me when I had other arboreal gecko species hatch), with a piece of paper towel, and like you said a rock. What temperature do I want to keep them at, I have a high basking temp for the adults, but I don't think I should give one to the hatchlings in such small enclosures. How about humidty? I know with leopard geckos its good to keep them with high humidty as they can become dehydrated easier and they need the extra moisture to help them shed.

Thanks, I'm sure I'll ask you more questions Nathan, thanks again. :)

geckoboy
07-17-2006, 03:24 PM
Hey Kevin,
I lightly mist the baby enclosures every other day but also keep a small water dish in the cage at all times. I find these guys suffer from dehydration quicker than other desert species juvies that I've worked with, which I found strange since the parents can go forever without water.
I just keep them at room temperature, which for my gecko room is about 85 during the day 75-80 at night and they do just fine (also opposite from their parents who like it really hot). Just make sure they have a fluorescent light above them...I've raised the juveniles as 'nocturnal' geckos before without a full spectrum bulb and a couple got deficiencies (probably calcium related) from the lack of light which resulted in funny looking limbs etc. I never have these problems with a light overhead.
If you need to email me off list feel free, but this info could be useful for others as well...it's up to you :)
Nathan

geckoboy
07-17-2006, 03:36 PM
Oh yah...just something I forgot to mention - you more than likely have P. guttatus, not hasselquistii. They are not nearly as common. P. guttatus make up a good majority of the imports here in Canada.
Nathan

Kevin McRae
07-17-2006, 04:59 PM
I'll get some pics up soon, but it doesn't look like it will be able to tell to easily.