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herperboy
07-25-2006, 06:14 PM
I want to know if it is HEALTHY to not give leachies crickets, and feed them strictly on t-rex leachie diet, baby food, and fruit because the way I have my tank set up the crickets just go and hide in the substrate and corkbark.

kozmo
07-25-2006, 07:01 PM
the t-rex diet needs no additional supplementation, you should not be using baby food at all, fresh fruit on occasion probably isn't that big of a deal, but I would cut out baby food altogether.

my leachi gets the diet only, nothing else, and he devours it every single time i feed him.

herperboy
07-25-2006, 07:35 PM
Cool thanks, I was getting tired of messing with crix. Do you suggest supplementing the diet with calcium and/or vitamin powder?

Nathan Hall
07-26-2006, 05:45 PM
It is a complete diet, Andrew. I still feed ALL of my leachies crickets in addition to MRP, fresh fruit, etc.

kozmo
07-26-2006, 06:53 PM
Cool thanks, I was getting tired of messing with crix. Do you suggest supplementing the diet with calcium and/or vitamin powder?

no, it isn't necessary.

Tariq Stark
07-27-2006, 07:50 AM
I'm kinda old fashioned I guess. I feed my R. leachianus (and my other Rhacodactylus spp) very diverse. Crickets, ****roaches (B. craniferr), Grasshoppers, Woodlice, waxmoths, pinkie mice, Mashed fruit and babyfood and various insects from outside. All are supplemented with calciumlactate.

Tariq

kozmo
07-27-2006, 11:28 AM
The insects are fine, collecting them from outside I would be EXTREMELY nervous about, something I would not do around my home, people around here spray for all types of insects year around, including all the farmers.

Baby food just isn't nutritionally balanced for geckos, it is basically empty calories, even when supplements are added to it, it's basically like junk food for them. The T-Rex diets are complete and balanced diets that require no additional supplementation.

Continuing to feed insects is fine, but the diets for the most part were meant to be an all-in-one solution and to get people off baby food. I would say fresh fruit is a much better way to go than baby food.

herperboy
07-27-2006, 01:22 PM
How do you offer the fresh fruit? I've been blending it into what is basically homemade baby food and offering it in a dish, but I'm not sure what the best way to offer it is?

kozmo
07-27-2006, 04:44 PM
blending, just like you do, i dont personally feed fresh fruit, just the diets.

Nathan Hall
08-08-2006, 03:03 AM
They really relish mashed bananas. Some of our specimens will eat it out of my hand.

herperboy
08-08-2006, 01:14 PM
Ahhhh cute :lol:

Tariq Stark
08-08-2006, 02:22 PM
They really relish mashed bananas. Some of our specimens will eat it out of my hand.

Mine also really like mashed bananas. But grapes and chopped apple are also readily taken. Snails are one of their favourite foudsources around here. :)

Tariq Stark

reptivet
08-05-2008, 08:53 AM
I feed my adult leachianus maily leach diet almost daily. The occasional adding of some fruit (a little percentage in the mix ) is just to give some variety. They also like cherry pieces or dried raisins on occasion. They are not very fond of pinky mice but 2 or 3 times montly I offer a few. My leachies adult do not like at all crickets and locusts. They may eat one occasionally but you can put crickets or locusts with them and they live togethere quite peacefully, so I do not use any insects for them. I have a spare henkeli male, 2 Gt dark mT Koghis females and one male, plus some eggs in incubation. The younger animal is 3and half the elder 4 and half years. I tend to mix banana with calcium carbonate ifi use it at all cause they like it, but it is extremely poor in calcium andvery unbalanced in Ca/P ratio.
hope this helps

CarpetShark
08-06-2008, 10:15 PM
Crickets aren't about being nutritionally correct for geckos, but rather being a sort of entertainment for them. It's called environmental stimulation. It's a proven health benefit; just ask any zoo.

I'm not trying to be... I don't know, anything? about this, but I feel very strongly that animals in captivity need environmental stimulation. How would you feel sitting in a cage with nothing to do?

reptivet
08-07-2008, 03:03 PM
Dear friend,

I am a vet specialising in zoological medicine, I have worked with about 10 zoos so far and I am reading also a book on the subject called " Environmental Enrichment for Captive animals".
Crickets may be enrichment for them, but also extra rubbish to clean when they defecate and when they die. So is this kind of enrichment worth for my geckos? They really do not seem interested in them. Maybe I should put crested geckos for them to have fun with :shock:
Just joking obviously. But I will follow your advice, I will put some crickets from time to time. Maybe they will really enjoy. I stopped cause it was not working, but leachianus have a very seasonal foraging behavioural also in captivity and they change their preferences from time to time. They are not very predictable that is probably one of the reasons why after 7 years of keeping and breeding Rhacodacylus I now keep only leachianus. For the same reason I do not recommend these to reptile beginners.
Cheers,

Gabriele


Crickets aren't about being nutritionally correct for geckos, but rather being a sort of entertainment for them. It's called environmental stimulation. It's a proven health....
I'm not trying to be... I don't know, anything? about this, but I feel very strongly that animals in captivity need environmental stimulation. How would you feel sitting in a cage with nothing to do?

Lunar Gecko
08-07-2008, 03:57 PM
I hand feed ours LGD plus a F/T pinkie once a month as well as some fresh fruit and sometimes CGD to mix it up. Once my roaches start breding I will see if he is interested in them.

CarpetShark
08-08-2008, 02:25 AM
I will be the first to admit I know very little about leachies. I was not aware of the fact that they are seasonal foragers or that they have little interest in crickets. Perhaps you could try a different kind of feeder insect? I think I even heard of someone feeding CB little anoles to leachies, but now that I think about it, it might have been a different species he was refering to. But perhaps it is worth a try?

As for cricket clean up, my critters devour their crickets so there's no worry about having to remove cricket carcasses. And you have to clean up their poo anyways...

Like I said, I feel very strongly that animals in captivity need some sort of enrichment. If you could find something other that crickets that works well, I would love to hear about it. Until then, I say offer crickets at least occassionally. ^.^


Dear friend,

I am a vet specialising in zoological medicine, I have worked with about 10 zoos so far and I am reading also a book on the subject called " Environmental Enrichment for Captive animals".
Crickets may be enrichment for them, but also extra rubbish to clean when they defecate and when they die. So is this kind of enrichment worth for my geckos? They really do not seem interested in them. Maybe I should put crested geckos for them to have fun with :shock:
Just joking obviously. But I will follow your advice, I will put some crickets from time to time. Maybe they will really enjoy. I stopped cause it was not working, but leachianus have a very seasonal foraging behavioural also in captivity and they change their preferences from time to time. They are not very predictable that is probably one of the reasons why after 7 years of keeping and breeding Rhacodacylus I now keep only leachianus. For the same reason I do not recommend these to reptile beginners.
Cheers,

Gabriele

Cristiana
08-08-2008, 04:14 AM
Somebody offers lori food?

luc
08-08-2008, 07:33 AM
Hi Gabriele, I just wanted to let you know that my mnt koghis leachies take crickets and pinkies(rat and mice) all year long. They realy love chasing them.

cadie
08-26-2008, 06:13 PM
Somebody offers lori food?


off subject but..I do... lol

reptivet
08-26-2008, 07:19 PM
My leachie have been for along time on the Repashy diet. At present it seems to be very hard to get in bulk in Uk so I switched them almost completely to the clarks gecko diet. I still use both by the way. The Clarks is eaten with more enthusiasm and it is always finished completely or so. I think that, at least for my limited experience regarding the palatability for my geckos, that the Repashy has more waste, so it is less palatable? On the other hand the Clarks seem to stimulate in them the production of more soft and smelly feces. I tried again the crickets tonight, that of course go to hide everywhere in the newspapers I am using as substrate. It is worth trying again tough. Regarding the lori diet: I do not have much experience with it (I used it years ago with phelsumas). Is it not too sweet? Is there any advantage in using it?

cadie
08-27-2008, 03:41 AM
the dry lori powder i use contains natural ingredients and is fortified with tons of vitamins and minerals. (including VIT D3 and Calcium) I like it because it does not spoil! that is one advantage (as long as you remember to take it out of the cage before mistings) when it makes contact with water, it gets stale... when i bought my leachies, lori powder was what they were being fed since hatchlings. it also last for a very long while :) but i also feed them supplemented organic meat and fruit baby foods and an occasional pinky. they arnt too fond of the crickets though unless they crawl right up to my leachies face. Mine dont really like to "hunt" their food, lazy bums lol .... and thats all ive tried so far

Menhir
08-29-2008, 04:01 AM
but also extra rubbish to clean when they defecate and when they die.
I offer them roaches in large glass bowls. My leachies love to hunt them and they cannot escape. If they don't like, I can take them out the other day.

seonage
09-01-2008, 12:06 PM
And what about polen, honey, jelly, grapes... Mines love that! I know use to have so much fat, but it have a lot of nutriens already...

jtmoney528
09-02-2008, 04:48 PM
Almost all of mine will eat out of my hands, I feed them crickets/roaches + MRP

Very occasional F/T Pinky

Occasional Wax Worms