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View Full Version : How do you incubate your picta eggs?



OlliH
05-08-2008, 05:51 AM
Hello.

My female picta is pregnant and will soon file the eggs.
Now I have one question:

How do you incubate your picta eggs?

According to literature the eggs also must be incubated drily.
But some other breeders said that they hatch ther eggs on Vermiculite with an air humidity of 70%.

With which method have you reached the best results?
Do you lay the eggs directly on the humid Vermiculite?

I hope for your answers!

eagle1
05-08-2008, 09:12 AM
Hi,

I love P. Picta, I have a lot of them, and actually I've breeded him succesfully.

In my experiment put the eggs directly on the moist vermiculite isn't a good solutions.

Better to put the egg in a cap (with dry perlite or vermiculite inside) and put the cap inside the incubation box with moist vermiculite.

Here some photos of my last hatched:

http://img260.imageshack.us/img260/7309/img1381800df1.jpg
http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/8268/img1383800vw3.jpg
http://img260.imageshack.us/img260/7437/img1386800ru6.jpg
http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/7599/img1392800vv1.jpg
http://img141.imageshack.us/img141/3796/img1394800lv6.jpg

OlliH
05-08-2008, 09:29 AM
Hi!

They are realy nice with this orange-touch. ;-)

I love Pictas too and hope to agree some small pictas next time.

AngelinaB
03-30-2009, 12:33 AM
my female pictus just layed her eggs today so i was kinda wondering the same thing, which way is better. making an incubator out of a water cooler with water and putting them in a container ontop of bricks with a water heater to control the temperature.. or just simply putting it in a container with moist soil and moss over top and putting it in a tank with a light over it? Its my first time dealing with eggs so any info would be greatly appreciated :)

rcobourn
03-30-2009, 11:52 AM
I keep mine in deli cups containing moist vermiculite, with the cups sitting on a heating pad maintained around 85F. I agree using a cap with dry vermiculite might be a good idea, although I've always just placed the eggs in a depression in the medium. Occasionally see a mold problem if kept too moist.

Look out, Picta are ridiculously prolific.

AngelinaB
03-30-2009, 12:45 PM
oh ok so they do hatch that way then, cuz i've been told to do it the other way but thanks that helped a lot :)

rcobourn
03-30-2009, 01:05 PM
oh ok so they do hatch that way then, cuz i've been told to do it the other way but thanks that helped a lot :)

They hatch like crazy. :)

firecrested
04-13-2009, 05:40 PM
I used moist vermiculite/perlite last year and hatched around 100 of them at 82 degrees (setup in my female leo incubator) with maybe 10 eggs going bad.

AngelinaB
04-14-2009, 12:25 AM
roughly how many months does it take to hatch them? the eggs look healthy, their white and you can see a vein on the egg on one of them.

reptirus
01-15-2010, 06:26 PM
Has anyone tried hatchrite with their picta eggs? I only use hatchrite, dont have any vermiculite or perlite around, would it be best to put the eggs right into the hatchrite or would it be better to put sand in a gatorade cap and put that in a container on hatchrite:? (http://ameryka.strefa.pl/)

DanaD
01-16-2010, 07:18 PM
Last year I hatched some pictas on almost dry sand (humidity between 50-60%), at room temperature (28-30 deg. C). They hatched just fine, took them 80-90 days.

tomek
01-19-2010, 10:17 AM
I keep the eggs in dry sand at around 28c, and high humidity.
Will it work? I think so.

Last year I found one guy hatched in the enclosure amidst his parents, with none of the conditions provided in the incubator (temp ranged 22 - 30c, low humidity).

DanaD
01-19-2010, 01:09 PM
I keep the eggs in dry sand at around 28c, and high humidity.
Will it work? I think so.

Last year I found one guy hatched in the enclosure amidst his parents, with none of the conditions provided in the incubator (temp ranged 22 - 30c, low humidity).

The eggs are hard shelled, you don't need to high humidity to hatch them.

reptirus
01-19-2010, 11:43 PM
Does this mean you can literly hatch them in sand with no extra humidity at all? With the same success rate as you would in hatchrite I should say...

reptirus
02-21-2010, 10:47 PM
no one knows? Found my first picta eggs in the females enclosure today, they had both somehow been ripped open though? I read in this thread that they lay hard shelled eggs, since they were sopt and ripped open does that mean maybe they sat in the echo earth alittle to long until i found them and they got soft (http://freeware.info.pl/software.html) and broke?

Ophidiophile
02-25-2010, 11:29 AM
no one knows? Found my first picta eggs in the females enclosure today, they had both somehow been ripped open though? I read in this thread that they lay hard shelled eggs, since they were sopt and ripped open does that mean maybe they sat in the echo earth alittle to long until i found them and they got soft and broke?

Picta eggs are very hard shelled and brittle. I think it's unlikely that they "got soft" from sitting in the substrate -- more likely to me is that they may not have been well-calcified to begin with. This could be because the female needs more calcium or it could just be that the eggs were not fertile and infertile eggs are often incompletely calcified.

Back in the early 90's when I first worked with picta, I had a lot of trouble incubating the eggs successfully because of mold problems. I now use a dry substrate of mixed fine vermiculite and perlite. A deli cup with the eggs partially buried in the substrate is placed in a larger rubbermaid or sterilite container that I mist down lightly every couple of days. Using this method of a dry substrate with transient humidity I'm hatching them out like crazy.

Hope this helps.

http://dptracer.home.comcast.net/~dptracer/images/CarPictaW.jpg