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View Full Version : Tokay is not eating HELP!



Albeon
08-14-2009, 06:18 PM
I have a female tokay and she is starting to become skinny, pale and lethargic. We have been feeding her through a syringe, giving her vitamins and some Jump Start to get her to eat. She seems to be afraid of the crickets, and I'm told that meal worms have no nutritional value. I want to know if there is anything else I can do to help my tokay.

freekygeeky
08-14-2009, 06:20 PM
I have a female tokay and she is starting to become skinny, pale and lethargic. We have been feeding her through a syringe, giving her vitamins and some Jump Start to get her to eat. She seems to be afraid of the crickets, and I'm told that meal worms have no nutritional value. I want to know if there is anything else I can do to help my tokay.

Firstly have you had a feacle(sp) test done? Most Tokays are WC, and most also come with parasites, worms etc.. You will need a test done to see if he she has these..and go from there..

Whats your set up like?

T-ReXx
08-14-2009, 06:35 PM
Take her to a qualified reptile veterinarian. Although intestinal parasites are common in WC tokays, there can be many reasons for a lizard to get sick. Also you need to reevaluate your husbandry. Is she too warm/cold? Is humidity correct? Does she have ample places to hide to avoid stress? A reptile vet is your best bet. And I agree, have a fecal done, it's standard necessity for WC animals.

holocaustto
08-14-2009, 07:12 PM
Fecal test asap.
After that, tell us what it says...

good luck! You're still on time to save that animal.

Riverside Reptiles
08-14-2009, 11:13 PM
I agree with everyone above that suggests a fecal. Also be aware that it doesn't take any special "reptile" vet to check a fecal. Any vet worth their weight should be able to read a fecal for you. If it happens to be a vet experienced in reptiles, all the better. As for mealworms...they are a poor nutritional choice for a staple diet. HOWEVER if your animal is losing weight and it'll eat mealworms...give them to it. Anything is better than nothing at all. Tokays in general tend to be pretty voracious feeders though. So if it's not feeding, there's most likely a problem that needs to be addressed.

Albeon
08-15-2009, 11:50 PM
Well, she's dead. I'm through attempting to "rescue" these sickly things from the local pet store. After I make 150% sure that the male is hale, hearty, happy, and healthy, along with all of those other H words that I haven't thought of, I'll look for a reputable breeder to supply me with another female. These pet store creatures constantly dying is really bad for my nerves

holocaustto
08-15-2009, 11:52 PM
These pet store creatures constantly dying is really bad for my nerves

Sucks...

Riverside Reptiles
08-15-2009, 11:59 PM
Sorry to hear that. When you're ready for a new one I suggest posting a "wanted" ad in the classifieds here as we have multiple users that captive breed them.

Albeon
08-15-2009, 11:59 PM
Anyone know who a good breeder might be?

Riverside Reptiles
08-16-2009, 12:01 AM
Anyone know who a good breeder might be?

See my above post

T-ReXx
08-16-2009, 01:53 AM
Sorry to hear that. But at least you learned something about pet stores. Almost every tokay and similar "cheap" gecko species in WC in pet stores. And animals that are captive bred are often exposed to these wild caught animals and can catch diseases/parasites from them. I avoid them like the plague. Obviously a new animal should be quarantined when/if you get one. And avoid the sob story animals, like you found out, sick reptiles often very shortly become dead reptiles, and you just waste money and time and get frustration. Captive bred is the way to go, or at least LTC(6 monthes+) animals.

Oh, and a side note about vets; reptiles should see a vet that is familiar with reptile disease and care. Yes, run of the mill vets can provide fecals, but if they are not used to dealing with reptiles they may not provide the correct care for your animals. I work in a Veterinary Hospital and all we see are dogs and cats. Both of our docs are very good with what they do(our anesthesia protocol is pretty much the finest I've ever seen) but if you brought them a sick reptile, or even another "exotic" like a bird or small mammal, they would need to confer with another vet who specializes in those species. Vets know basics for general species, but most specialize in particular areas and good ones will ask for help from someone who knows their stuff if it's outside their particular box. This takes time and possibly expensive and sometimes unnecessary tests. With a seriously ill animal you dont have time to waste, when reptiles show signs of being sick, they are usually really sick. Save yourself the trouble and get familiar with a vet who knows the animals you keep. I get 50% off vet care at work and I still take my reptiles to a different hospital who has a reptile specialist on staff. It's just smart business.

Riverside Reptiles
08-16-2009, 08:58 AM
Sorry to hear that. But at least you learned something about pet stores. Almost every tokay and similar "cheap" gecko species in WC in pet stores. And animals that are captive bred are often exposed to these wild caught animals and can catch diseases/parasites from them. I avoid them like the plague. Obviously a new animal should be quarantined when/if you get one. And avoid the sob story animals, like you found out, sick reptiles often very shortly become dead reptiles, and you just waste money and time and get frustration. Captive bred is the way to go, or at least LTC(6 monthes+) animals.

Oh, and a side note about vets; reptiles should see a vet that is familiar with reptile disease and care. Yes, run of the mill vets can provide fecals, but if they are not used to dealing with reptiles they may not provide the correct care for your animals. I work in a Veterinary Hospital and all we see are dogs and cats. Both of our docs are very good with what they do(our anesthesia protocol is pretty much the finest I've ever seen) but if you brought them a sick reptile, or even another "exotic" like a bird or small mammal, they would need to confer with another vet who specializes in those species. Vets know basics for general species, but most specialize in particular areas and good ones will ask for help from someone who knows their stuff if it's outside their particular box. This takes time and possibly expensive and sometimes unnecessary tests. With a seriously ill animal you dont have time to waste, when reptiles show signs of being sick, they are usually really sick. Save yourself the trouble and get familiar with a vet who knows the animals you keep. I get 50% off vet care at work and I still take my reptiles to a different hospital who has a reptile specialist on staff. It's just smart business.



Often times, due to location, people don't have the option of going to a "reptile" vet. And it's always better to seek some veterinary care than none at all. I worked in animal medicine for many years and can say from experience that if a clinician can't read a proper fecal (despite what animal it comes from), they shouldn't practice medicine. Obviously it's in ones best interest to seek the most qualified care possible (when possible). But I'll never discourage someone from going to a regular vet if that's the option between care and no care. Especially for something as simple as a fecal.