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View Full Version : leucy/ pied tokay not mutation but locality issue?



bumi dragon
08-29-2012, 10:06 AM
Hi guys, I hv a crucial question about leucy / pied tokay. To my knowledge its mutation morph, until lately, someone told me these both specimens r actually locality morph, not mutation morph. Kind of need advise her, wat do u guys think? Pls share with us. I would like to thank u guys first for reading my noob question. Any helps would b much appreciated.

Marauderhex
08-29-2012, 11:52 AM
The genetics that cause these morphs might be more prevelant in certain populations, but overall it's still a genetics issue, not an environmental one.

billewicz
09-10-2012, 12:32 AM
From what we see in other reptiles, it is probably both. Both meaning that we will most likely end up with several different 'strains' of the same visual morphs.

Just like there are at least 7 different albino strains that are not compatible with each other within the Leopard Gecko world, each one is a 'locale' specific strain in that the marker in the genetic code is in a different place for each strain.

I have over 12 pair of pied, and progressive pied Tokay and almost all to date throw normal looking offspring. The proof will be when we can line breed some of their offspring and see what happens then. Give me a couple of years though.......

T-ReXx
09-10-2012, 10:15 PM
I agree, it's likely both a case of locality specific populations and a genetic variation.

Not to get off topic, but just to Clarify, I'm pretty sure there are only three proven albino strains of leopard gecko; the bell, tremper, and rainwater.

billewicz
09-10-2012, 10:40 PM
I agree, it's likely both a case of locality specific populations and a genetic variation.

Not to get off topic, but just to Clarify, I'm pretty sure there are only three proven albino strains of leopard gecko; the bell, tremper, and rainwater.

Agreed. The three established albino strains are as you have listed. I'm to understand that there are some folk working on up to four more possible additional strains. Like every other breeding project, it can take a few years to prove out genetics through actual breeding.

Obviously Leos have enjoyed over 35 years of captive breeding and morph development. There has been no successful long-term Tokay breeding projects to date so we do not have a lot of results to go on yet.

We do have a plethora of naturally occurring colors and patterns in Tokay to look to. But we have only just begun to deciphered the simplest of the visual genetics. This will take years.