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Nocturnalnature
05-11-2013, 07:06 AM
Over the past few months I have developed a burning desire to obtain a few pairs of these remarkable little geckos, but I can't seem to find anyone who has them available here in the states.
A Google search returns older ads from a few years ago, and it seems that even the well known gecko breeders no longer work with them. From what I have read they are relatively easy to maintain, as well as breed, which has me scratching my head at the lack of availability.
If anybody works with these little guys, or has a promising lead, please let me know.

mikew1234
05-13-2013, 02:17 AM
Diplodactylus as a whole are not common geckos. Many people do not work with them because they are a small species, have a very short breeding period (3-5 years or seasons) and there is a VERY SMALL gene pool, making less hardy geckos as time goes on. D. Galeatus is the most sought after, and most worked with, but are still very difficult to find. You can try the classifieds section here, or other classifieds sites, but it will absolutely be hit or miss here in the USA. They are much more popular in Europe and Japan than the USA.

Nocturnalnature
05-13-2013, 11:19 PM
Thanks for the reply.
I am surprised more people from this forum haven't replied since it seems we have many members who work with unusual or uncommon species in general.
My hopes were to obtain a small group of galeatus to work with, but I may have to go with plan B and jump on the Oedura bandwagon since they have been making an appearance on several websites recently.

mikew1234
05-13-2013, 11:49 PM
I keep both Diplodactlyus and Oedura. Their care is like night and day. I keep my diplodactylus in a rack system at the time, but have recently began building a new rack system which I hope will allow for good viewing, as well as cleaning etc. My oedura are kept in pairs and trios in modified 10 gallon enclosures. I will post a few pics of my animals at the bottom of this post to help you with your decision.
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa443/mikew1234/91faaa8b-faf8-4c08-a420-092ad38dfcb2.jpg (http://s1198.photobucket.com/user/mikew1234/media/91faaa8b-faf8-4c08-a420-092ad38dfcb2.jpg.html)
DIPLODACTYLUS PULCHER
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa443/mikew1234/pictures1019.jpg (http://s1198.photobucket.com/user/mikew1234/media/pictures1019.jpg.html)
OEDURA MONILIS (line 1)
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa443/mikew1234/pictures1018.jpg (http://s1198.photobucket.com/user/mikew1234/media/pictures1018.jpg.html)
OEDURA MONILIS(line 2)
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa443/mikew1234/CAngulifer005_zps8ce77b6c.jpg (http://s1198.photobucket.com/user/mikew1234/media/CAngulifer005_zps8ce77b6c.jpg.html)
OEDURA CASTELNAUI (I received her with the wavy tail, but it does not affect her in any way)
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa443/mikew1234/pictures1009.jpg (http://s1198.photobucket.com/user/mikew1234/media/pictures1009.jpg.html)
STROPHURUS WILLIAMSI

Nocturnalnature
05-14-2013, 12:21 AM
Awesome photos!
Once again I appreciate the input. I am fully aware of the husbandry differences between the two, although I can see where that might be questioned, jumping from one extreme to the other. I am simply wanting to branch out from my current Nephrurus, but want to stay with animals from the same continent.
I've also considered adding a few Egernia since I have had good luck with them in the past, but they just aren't as amusing or interesting as the geckos.
I swear I made a mistake when I got my first pair of Knobbies. They are as addictive as crack, and I have all but loaned out or sold most of my other projects to concentrate solely on them.

SamNabz
05-14-2013, 02:08 AM
Diplodactylus and Lucasium sp. are pretty hard to track down here in Australia, so I can only imagine what their availability is like overseas.

Whilst they are (for the most part) relatively easy to keep & breed, not many keepers have great success with them. I've contacted many previous keepers of these geckos over the years and a majority of the responses I received was usually that the stock was now dead and that they were never able to successfully breed them.

I know there are a few keepers in Europe who keep/breed various species of both genera with great success, including species not yet available to us here. Might be worth contacting some of them if you are able to export to the US.

Good luck.

GeckPhotographer
05-14-2013, 07:13 PM
Diplodactylus and Lucasium sp. are pretty hard to track down here in Australia, so I can only imagine what their availability is like overseas.

Whilst they are (for the most part) relatively easy to keep & breed, not many keepers have great success with them. I've contacted many previous keepers of these geckos over the years and a majority of the responses I received was usually that the stock was now dead and that they were never able to successfully breed them.

I know there are a few keepers in Europe who keep/breed various species of both genera with great success, including species not yet available to us here. Might be worth contacting some of them if you are able to export to the US.

Good luck.

Yeah but more than half the stuff over there isn't what people think it is. 90% of the D.graniarensis are actually D.furcosus, and the D.granariensis rex are actually D.g. granariensis. It's kinda hilarious.

That's got to be the worst coloured O.castelnaui I've seen, wild type below. :P


http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4145/4978636703_d1900108c8_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4978636703/)
Oedura castelnaui (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4978636703/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

Elizabeth Freer
05-14-2013, 07:48 PM
Over the past few months I have developed a burning desire to obtain a few pairs of these remarkable little geckos, but I can't seem to find anyone who has them available here in the states.
A Google search returns older ads from a few years ago, and it seems that even the well known gecko breeders no longer work with them. From what I have read they are relatively easy to maintain, as well as breed, which has me scratching my head at the lack of availability.
If anybody works with these little guys, or has a promising lead, please let me know.

Have you tried John Heiser on Long Island? He goes by Heiser on GU. Could PM him?

SamNabz
05-14-2013, 08:39 PM
Yeah but more than half the stuff over there isn't what people think it is. 90% of the D.graniarensis are actually D.furcosus, and the D.granariensis rex are actually D.g. granariensis. It's kinda hilarious.

Very true, Steve.


That's got to be the worst coloured O.castelnaui I've seen, wild type below. :P


http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4145/4978636703_d1900108c8_b.jpg

A few of my O. castelnaui sometimes have that same dark colouration as shown by mikew1234 (above) during the day, and they are much lighter than that wild specimen in your pic.

Nocturnalnature
05-14-2013, 09:04 PM
Have you tried John Heiser on Long Island? He goes by Heiser on GU. Could PM him?

I did indeed contact him. Although he still has them, he doesn't have plans to offer any offspring in the near future. I truly appreciate the reply though!

mikew1234
05-14-2013, 10:15 PM
Are you making fun of my Castelnaui? Mine are German type. Lol. It's not their fault they aren't as nice as the wild ones. How about you guys send some new ones to us from down there? And I think my monilis make up for the Castelnaui's lack of color.

GeckPhotographer
05-14-2013, 10:59 PM
Are you making fun of my Castelnaui? Mine are German type. Lol. It's not their fault they aren't as nice as the wild ones. How about you guys send some new ones to us from down there? And I think my monilis make up for the Castelnaui's lack of color.

Ironic considering monilis wt are less colourful than castel wt. :P And yes, you have so much stuff better than us I mayaswell rub in what we do. ;)

Wild saxicoline territory O. cf marmorata are probably the most colourful Oedura I've seen in the wild here.
Do you have marms of this form over there?
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8265/8638805969_2030009f23_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8638805969/)
Oedura marmorata (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8638805969/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

mikew1234
05-15-2013, 11:45 PM
I wouldn't know. I've only seen Coggeri, Castelnaui, Monilis and Robousta in person. The Marms I have seen in pictures are more oscillated than that, more, but smaller spotting, and much more dull yellow. Got any wild Galeatus or Pulcher pictures? My male D. Pulcher is pictured above, and is very bright. The female is very drab, being tan and gray. I'm curious to see what the normal look is for them. And I can imagine that a Galeatus wild type must be crazy.

GeckPhotographer
05-16-2013, 01:28 AM
Wild pulcher, from the southern end of the range, the northern pilbara ones are brighter red.

http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4133/4979254360_6d6aa4e661_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4979254360/)
Diplodactylus pulcher (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4979254360/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2769/4453247455_20bf432c56_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4453247455/)
Diplodactylus pulcher (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4453247455/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

I don't have galeautus pictures, but I plan to get some in february.

A few more of the marmorata species complex.

Eastern Form
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8256/8693389663_106db9841b_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8693389663/)
Oedura marmorata (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8693389663/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8217/8309805338_d4b6df5e7b_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8309805338/)
Oedura marmorata (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8309805338/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

Murchison form.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7162/6556666973_2ec4a46967_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6556666973/)
Oedura marmorata (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6556666973/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

mikew1234
05-16-2013, 01:59 AM
I really need to get the money together to go to Australia. The male, as you can see is a salmon color, closer to the top picture. My female is blotched, and exactly like the bottom in coloration. And that Murchison form one is awesome looking. Are all of these in your collection? Or field pics?

SHzac
05-16-2013, 03:02 PM
Hi,
I agree, there are a lot of "D.gran.gran." in Europe wich are probably a different species. So D. furcosus... how do you know exactly? Photo diagnostics? Is there a way to see/prove that?
Would be happy to know!
cheers
Sacha

sciteacher
05-16-2013, 04:50 PM
I've got a virgin trio of D. galeatus that I put together late last summer. I wasn't too surprised that I didn't get any eggs that late in the season. I am a little surprised that they haven't started producing for me this year. The females look quite heavy and I keep expecting them to start laying any time, but nothing yet. My fingers are crossed, and I hope I can report some success in the near future.

I agree that they almost seem to have disappeared from the hobby. A few years ago they were quite easy to find, although a bit pricey. You just don't see them offered much the last couple of years. Hopefully there are still a few people out there like me who have them, so that some genetic diversity can be maintained. Mine came from John Zabroski (Elusive Exotics), but I don't know if he works with them anymore or not.

GeckPhotographer
05-16-2013, 08:11 PM
Hi,
I agree, there are a lot of "D.gran.gran." in Europe wich are probably a different species. So D. furcosus... how do you know exactly? Photo diagnostics? Is there a way to see/prove that?
Would be happy to know!
cheers
Sacha

This paper gives the diagnostic characteristics, http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2009/f/zt02167p046.pdf. However it is unfortunate that most characteristics are slightly subjective, hard to tell in photos and really require you to have seen the species, based on distribution ID (and some variation within them) before you can really ID them through morphology alone.

Here's a quick run down in general.
D.granariensis: Plain pattern, possibly some white lateral spots that are not dark edged (or only partially dark edged), D.g.rex with a dark mid-lateral line. Bifurcation of the nape can occur but usually not strongly. Z
Wild D.g.granariensis
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4133/4979253296_ef68af51b1_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4979253296/)
Diplodactylus granariensis (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/4979253296/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr
Wild D.g.rex
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7148/6484403959_00b482b78a_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6484403959/)
Diplodactylus granariensis (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6484403959/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr
Diplodactylus ornatus was split much further back and isn't in that paper, however in my experience is probably one of the easiest to confuse in the wild. The vertebral line of these guys has less dark edging than grans, is straighter bur with more 'lumps' where it juts out, and always has white splotching around the mid-lateral region, often quite messy and not faded.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7020/6484404899_6025561a2e_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6484404899/)
Diplodactylus ornatus (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6484404899/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

Diplodactylus furcosus: these are quite yellow in colour compared to other Diplos (going to red even), while this is by no means diagnostic it's a good indicator. They have very strong bifurcation at the nape, the lateral pattern can be indistinct - marginally distinct with dark edging to spots. A strong candidate for many of your overseas "D.granariensis"
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8493/8321649012_ae1ec15c9a_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8321649012/)
Diplodactylus furcosus (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8321649012/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

Diplodactylus calcicolus: Vertebral often broken and strongly wavy, lots of lateral pattern with strongly dark edged spots and colour flecking of different scales. I don't have wild pics of this but there's one in the paper and these are almost definitely some.
http://www.geckosunlimited.com/community/aussie-geckos-diplodactylus-strophurus-saltuaris-phyllurus-oedura/65382-diplodactylus-granariensis-granariensis.html

Diplodactylus wiru is almost definitely not in captivity, I'll go get some pics of them in November to rub in your faces. :P

Diplodactylus vittatus: Very plain, no head bifurcation, most easily mistaken for D.wiru not any of the other species.
Eastern D.vittatus
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7209/6835633512_851a50ea2f_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6835633512/)
Diplodactylus vittatus (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/6835633512/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

Western D.vittatus
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8491/8321645978_a774f752e2_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8321645978/)
Diplodactylus vittatus (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/8321645978/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

I don't think anyone has trouble identifying D.polyophthalmus? but it is definitely in that stone gecko group, a sister species to the granariensis clade.
D.polyophthalmus
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4145/5070310483_7d4097e7f1_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/5070310483/)
Diplodactylus polyophthalmus (http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephenmahony/5070310483/) by Stephen Mahony (http://www.flickr.com/people/stephenmahony/), on Flickr

Now this does not mean by any measure IDs of captive animals (in Australia or otherwise) can always be made with any confidence. There's some pictures on here that blow me away, I just don't know what they are, and pictures of stuff that's very clearly one thing but looks nothing like it should.

E.g.
http://www.geckosunlimited.com/community/aussie-geckos-diplodactylus-strophurus-saltuaris-phyllurus-oedura/68436-some-my-diplos.html
The first D.galeatus WOW! what the hell that is not what a galeatus looks like, but it's clearly not anything else.

http://www.geckosunlimited.com/community/aussie-geckos-diplodactylus-strophurus-saltuaris-phyllurus-oedura/54515-d-g-granariensis.html
Some more probably calcicolus definitely not granariensis

http://www.geckosunlimited.com/community/aussie-geckos-diplodactylus-strophurus-saltuaris-phyllurus-oedura/41589-our-diplodactylus.html
The Diplos here listed as D.g.rex are really D.granariensis granariensis......

http://www.geckosunlimited.com/community/aussie-geckos-diplodactylus-strophurus-saltuaris-phyllurus-oedura/30173-diplodactylus-g-granariensis.html
Not entirely sure what these are, but probably calci.


It's odd before writing this reply I honestly thought most of the stuff I saw Mis-ID'd was furcosus but now I can't find any of that, just a lot of Mis-ID'd calcicolus.


Anyway hope this helps, I'll re-post pics in here of D.wiru and D.calcicolus when I get them later in the year, if I remember.

Elizabeth Freer
05-17-2013, 04:43 AM
Eye candy, for sure :D

SHzac
05-17-2013, 05:43 AM
Thank you very mutch for this informative post. If most of the "D.gran.gran." would be D.furcosus it would be easy to prove that by their karyotype. Because I saw that they should have n=36 while the other species are n=38. Does anybody know other molecular markers?
I have Diplodactylus sp. (see picture below) and want to know what it is. photo diagnostics seems to be not the best way, because the whole taxon is very variable depending their patterns. What do you think I have there and why ( ;) ).
It is very good, that the discussion is getting started, but before the guessing wave, I would like to have some evidence ;)
It's nice to have some people with species knowledge here.
Ok. so here are some pictures of my Diplodactylus sp.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8132/8747370348_ce634fca58_n.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8266/8747367778_b88e615bd5_n.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8116/8747374764_7200e46550_n.jpg

Cheers
Sacha

GeckPhotographer
05-17-2013, 11:45 PM
Ok, so yesterday a friend in Australia put up some pictures of captives he'd just gotten (this friend is Sam who's posted in this thread, perhaps he'll put the pics up here???), which I initially ID'd as calci, but after some discussion bent toward furcosus. This discussion brought up some things that would strongly influence that post I made the other day, but only in the area of ID between furcosus and calcicolus.

Specifically furcosus represented in the paper and those individuals I have seen personally are indeed much less patterned than they can get.
This picture by Jordan de Jong show's how patterned they can get. (I am hoping that since I'm directly linking to his picture, not actually using it this doesn't break copyright?)
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8078/8382354854_b53d3e6f67_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/whawha88/8382354854/)
IMG_1862.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/whawha88/8382354854/) by Jordan de Jong (http://www.flickr.com/people/whawha88/), on Flickr

Furthermore it appears that D.calcicolus do not have bifurcation at the nape but that the appearance of this shown in some pictures is caused by extreme broken pattern, not 'real' bifurcation.

Pictures at these links showing just how messy this is.
http://members.iinet.net.au/~bush/cascades.html
Diplodactylus calcicolus photo - Ray Lloyd photos at pbase.com (http://www.pbase.com/image/131751583)

Based on these changes to my understanding of their morphology. (Please keep in mind I've never seen calcicolus in the flesh, it is a strong weak point in my understanding unfortunately). I would most likely change my mind of those I ID'd the other day as calci to furcosus, based on them having true nape bifurcation, and the base colour of their dorsal and lateral surface is fairly constant, not messily flecked like calci are supposed to be.


Now onto Sacha's geckos.

I would ID that as D.furcosus. Why?

Bifurcation of the nape is very strong and distinctly part of the vertebral line not due to pattern 'break up'. This occurs to my (current) knowledge in only D.granariensis and D.furcosus and ALWAYS occurs in furcosus while only occasionally in granariensis.

White spots on the flanks are strongly circular, distinct and darkly edged. This is extremely similar to the WT furcosus shown in Jordan's picture, which is possibly typical of the population captives were established from.
In D.granariensis the pattern on the lateral zones expected would be dull white spots not particularly formed into circles more like what I call "ghost spots" (non circular but strongly white spots would be indicative of ornatus, but it clearly isn't that.)


Because I saw that they should have n=36 while the other species are n=38
D.furcosus are 34, D.calcicolus are 38, and D.granariensis 36 according to the paper. (Interestingly vittatus and wiru are both also 38 and are quite morphologically similar, possibly a direct geographical isolation???)

Now onto a different point you made, the species karyotype. You're right that the chromosomal number is different between the species, and that this could be used to ID between furcosus and calcicolus (which I personally believe are the two confusing species, I think granariensis is quite obviously morphologically different). This however is probably going to end up fairly expensive if you want to do it for every individual coming into your collection, that's your problem of course ;) .

Something interesting to consider is that when this paper published there was some skepticism among certain people believing that furcosus, calcicolus, wiru and granariensis could probably hybridise in captivity.
Obviously the karyotypic differences between some indicate it unlikely but I would definitely like to see the experiment done. (I'm not particularly a geneticist, but even more interesting would be to look at what chromosomes those with lower 2n counts are missing, perhaps through clever analysis this could be a good example of speciation due to "spontaneous" (I obviously assume some natural condition, cold, chemicals, whatever caused this) chromosome addition (this can cause due to problems occurring in meiosis, although it's assumed to be rare). Since stone geckos are clearly a monophyletic group (Look up studies on Diplodactylus, Lucasium split if you want to research this), this could be very interesting if it could determine whether speciation occurred followed by karyotype mutation or karyotype mutation caused speciation. (Much like the polyploidy speciation model supported by Neobatrachus frogs.)


Sorry, I realize most of what I just said was questions, not answers, and I know my understanding of such concepts aren't particularly advanced, but once I started thinking I had to write it. :P

SHzac
05-18-2013, 10:40 AM
D.furcosus are 34, D.calcicolus are 38, and D.granariensis 36 according to the paper. (Interestingly vittatus and wiru are both also 38 and are quite morphologically similar, possibly a direct geographical isolation???)

Now onto a different point you made, the species karyotype. You're right that the chromosomal number is different between the species, and that this could be used to ID between furcosus and calcicolus (which I personally believe are the two confusing species, I think granariensis is quite obviously morphologically different). This however is probably going to end up fairly expensive if you want to do it for every individual coming into your collection, that's your problem of course ;) .

Oh I know that this would be expensive, but in the lab course of a colleague they karyotype Drosophila & Co. Thus, some other tissue would not bother I think. I am going to ask him if it is possible to involve it in the practical course. If not I would find another way. If you are right about the species the karyotype 2n=34 would be the final prove.
I'll see...


Something interesting to consider is that when this paper published there was some skepticism among certain people believing that furcosus, calcicolus, wiru and granariensis could probably hybridise in captivity.
Obviously the karyotypic differences between some indicate it unlikely but I would definitely like to see the experiment done. (I'm not particularly a geneticist, but even more interesting would be to look at what chromosomes those with lower 2n counts are missing, perhaps through clever analysis this could be a good example of speciation due to "spontaneous" (I obviously assume some natural condition, cold, chemicals, whatever caused this) chromosome addition (this can cause due to problems occurring in meiosis, although it's assumed to be rare). Since stone geckos are clearly a monophyletic group (Look up studies on Diplodactylus, Lucasium split if you want to research this), this could be very interesting if it could determine whether speciation occurred followed by karyotype mutation or karyotype mutation caused speciation. (Much like the polyploidy speciation model supported by Neobatrachus frogs.)

Sorry, I realize most of what I just said was questions, not answers, and I know my understanding of such concepts aren't particularly advanced, but once I started thinking I had to write it. :P

I would say, this is pretty advanced for most of the people reading a gecko Forum ;)
Anyway... I agree about the speciation hypothesis. Furthermore I would say that the different chromosome amounts are preventing sympatric species according hybridisation events.
This could be part of a sympatric speciation.
Do you (or anybody else here in the forum) know about other markers? I could perform a (or some) PCRs on them to get some evidence... but up to now I couldn't find published primers or species specific DNA sequences.

Okay. Very interesting topic.
Cheers and thanks for the input!
Sacha

SamNabz
05-19-2013, 08:16 PM
Great posts, Stephen, and definitely a subject that needed to be touched on.

Here are the pics of the 1.2 D. furcosus I purchased recently which were sold as D. g. granariensis.

The pattern on the male in the second pic definitely resembles that of calcicolus; however, the nape bifurcation is what veered our decision back to furcosus. Also, the breeder of these geckos has been selectively line-breeding his stock for the 'spotted' patterning.

Single Female
http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/971770_10151680206873125_2095750033_n.jpg

Male (left) Female (right)
http://sphotos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/487599_10151680204368125_1887538271_n.jpg

And here is another female D. furcosus purchased elsewhere which is from WC parents:

http://sphotos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/969650_10151673317403125_1235320531_n.jpg