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    Default Thick tailed gecko not eating!


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    I have a male thick tailed gecko named Pez. He has know not been eating properly now for several months. I keep him in a very large cage, around 60 gallons, I do not have a heat mat so that may be a factor I also recently cleaned out and redid his cage so that may be another factor. Please help! I don't want my gecko to starve to death.
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    Give us a rundown of the enclosure setup, temperatures, food offered, etc. You said you don't have a heat pad, does that mean you don't have any heat source at all? If the gecko is unable to appropriately thermoregulate throughout its enclosure, a whole host of problems can and will arise.
    Assuming you did your research before purchasing your pet, and are practicing good husbandry, you may want to try a smaller cage size. This increases the likelihood of the animal encountering a food item (thus offering more opportunities to feed). It is important to note, however, that putting too many food items in the enclosure at once can overwhelm and stress the gecko. Try just one or two food items at a time. Hope this helps,
    Jake
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakemyster44 View Post
    Give us a rundown of the enclosure setup, temperatures, food offered, etc. You said you don't have a heat pad, does that mean you don't have any heat source at all? If the gecko is unable to appropriately thermoregulate throughout its enclosure, a whole host of problems can and will arise.
    Assuming you did your research before purchasing your pet, and are practicing good husbandry, you may want to try a smaller cage size. This increases the likelihood of the animal encountering a food item (thus offering more opportunities to feed). It is important to note, however, that putting too many food items in the enclosure at once can overwhelm and stress the gecko. Try just one or two food items at a time. Hope this helps,
    Jake
    Thank you. Yes he has no source of heat. Should I get him a 50 to 60gallon tank heat mat?
    Plus I also live in sunny Australia so he doesn't get very cold. I feed him 5 medium crickets every second night. He has 3 hides. One is an exo terra medium cave, a medium reptile den and a pile of rocks which I made a small cavern out of. The substrate is red desert sand. I regularly spray him about once a week. He also has a large stick to climb on. Thanks in advance.

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    Even in sunny Australia, room temperature is not always adequate. Reptiles cannot generate their own body heat, they need to move about their environment in order to keep their body at the desired temperature. The enclosure must have different temperature zones so that the animal can regulate its body temperature. You want one end of the cage to be around 30 C, and the other to be cooler (room temp). This allows the gecko to choose its temperature, and is vital for digestion and other processes. A heat pad will work to maintain this heat gradient, but you will need to control its temperature as some can get far too hot. A rheostat works nicely for this purpose. A good thermometer is absolutely essential as well, when owning any reptile. Place your hides so that there is one on the warm side, one on the cool side, and one in the middle.

    It is good to see that you are working to figure out how to best help your gecko! I would suggest in the future that you research how to care for the animal before you buy it. It is really not fair that any pet suffer as a result of the keepers ignorance. There are tons of articles online, and many informative threads in this forum. Take some time to read through them, you will be sure to learn a lot from them and your gecko will thank you!

    Jake

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    Welcome aboard!

    My EDIT is based upon Hilde's post 6. Steve Comber, author of the Underwoodisaurus milii (thick-tailed gecko) caresheet shared by the Victorian Herpetological Society, suggests more localized heat depending upon the season. Please read the VHS link in full.

    In part:
    From Steve Comber's Victorian Herpetological Society caresheet
    "LIGHTING AND HEATING

    Unfortunately the geckoes aren’t exposed to natural light cycles, however the natural cycle is closely mimicked utilising a 40w fluorescent tube connected to a digital timer located above the enclosures.

    During the night the room is lit by a 25w blue globe located on the ceiling. Although geckos have good night vision, I feel that all my geckos benefit from the dim light produced during their active period, aiding them in locating their food items. Other reptile cages in the room raise the ambient temperature considerably. Due to the Thick-tailed Geckos being easily heat stressed, they are housed at the lowest level within the room. This also enables me to control the heat more easily, and they experience lower temperatures during the winter months.

    Throughout the summer months the air temperature in the top crevices ranges between 23-27 c, dropping to the mid to low 20 s throughout the night. The geckos can escape this heat by retreating to the lower crevice to lay on the bare glass. However, the above temperatures seem to be comfortable for them. In the winter months I let the temperatures drop quite low, especially during the night, trying to keep them as natural as possible. The day temperatures still reach up to around 18 c but drop as low as 9 c over the night period. Thick-tailed Geckos have been observed active in the field with a body temperature of 8 c (M. Kearney pers. comm.)

    A strip of self regulating heat tape (8w/ft) runs along the underneath of the front edge of the cage. Individual bricks are placed directly above the heat tape to spread the heat to a mild, even temperature. This raises the brick temperature approximately 4-5 c above the maximum temperature. The bricks also play a role in preventing egg deposition directly on the heat tape. The geckos quite regularly lie on these bricks during the night, especially after feeding. Most importantly when females are gravid they spend a lot of time laying flat on the warmth. This behaviour has been observed in the field on the warm rocks heated by the day’s sun (pers. obs., S. Comber and M. Kearney). The heat tape is on all night throughout September to March, for an hour after dark during April and August, and is switched off completely during May, June and July."
    Thermostats are set to a certain temperature. Once they reach that temperature they shut off. When the temperature drops a little, the thermostat automatically turns on. Rheostats do not have that capability.

    I'd place multiple hides in a 50-60 gallon tank.

    I wonder whether a clear glass food dish might be an option. That would lessen insect escapees, might work for your gecko, and give you a way to monitor your gecko's intake.

    I'd add a water dish.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 08-07-2016 at 04:27 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakemyster44 View Post
    The enclosure must have different temperature zones so that the animal can regulate its body temperature. You want one end of the cage to be around 30 C, and the other to be cooler (room temp).
    Thick-tailed geckos are easily heat-stressed. People typically think of Australian geckos as needing high heat, though these geckos stick to micro-climates.
    The suggested hot spot is 23-27C (73-80F), though a wee bit warmer won't be too much for them to handle.
    You might not have to supply any extra heat.

    You might benefit from the info in this caresheet: Victorian Herpetological SocietyTHICK-TAILED GECKO - Victorian Herpetological Society
    Last edited by Hilde; 08-07-2016 at 12:22 AM.
    Thanks Elizabeth Freer thanked for this post

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakemyster44 View Post
    Even in sunny Australia, room temperature is not always adequate. Reptiles cannot generate their own body heat, they need to move about their environment in order to keep their body at the desired temperature. The enclosure must have different temperature zones so that the animal can regulate its body temperature. You want one end of the cage to be around 30 C, and the other to be cooler (room temp). This allows the gecko to choose its temperature, and is vital for digestion and other processes. A heat pad will work to maintain this heat gradient, but you will need to control its temperature as some can get far too hot. A rheostat works nicely for this purpose. A good thermometer is absolutely essential as well, when owning any reptile. Place your hides so that there is one on the warm side, one on the cool side, and one in the middle.

    It is good to see that you are working to figure out how to best help your gecko! I would suggest in the future that you research how to care for the animal before you buy it. It is really not fair that any pet suffer as a result of the keepers ignorance. There are tons of articles online, and many informative threads in this forum. Take some time to read through them, you will be sure to learn a lot from them and your gecko will thank you!

    Jake
    I did do my research! I researched for 1 year before I got him! I did have a heat mat but is is to small. So don't say that I didn't dos my research when I did! Anyway the coldest it has ever gotten on the cold side of his cage was 16 degrees (not sure about the warm side) and that was in the height of winter. It is winter right now so that may be why he has reduced eating. He did reduce eating last winter but not as much but he was still growing then so he wouldn't have been able to not eat for as long. Also nearly every night (in winter) it gets down to around 9 degrees so I think one or two nights a year where it gets to 16 degrees will be fine for him. So is it because of winter? Or because of winter? Thanks so much for answearing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    Welcome aboard!

    My EDIT is based upon Hilde's post 6. Steve Comber, author of the Underwoodisaurus milii (thick-tailed gecko) caresheet shared by the Victorian Herpetological Society, suggests more localized heat depending upon the season. Please read the VHS link in full.

    In part:


    Thermostats are set to a certain temperature. Once they reach that temperature they shut off. When the temperature drops a little, the thermostat automatically turns on. Rheostats do not have that capability.

    I'd place multiple hides in a 50-60 gallon tank.

    I wonder whether a clear glass food dish might be an option. That would lessen insect escapees, might work for your gecko, and give you a way to monitor your gecko's intake.

    I'd add a water dish.
    Thanks!
    I haven't thought of a glass dhish before so you may be on to something! Also I do have a water dish but I hardly ever fill it up as Pez never drinks out of it (he licks of the water droplets when I spray him to get water).
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    I'm sometimes "on to something"!

    For a terrestrial gecko you may need a rock ramp of sorts leading to the rim of this dish.

    Click: Anchor Hooking round storage dish 8 ounce red lid - AOL Image Search Results
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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