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Thread: E-g-g-s!

  1. #1
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    Cool E-g-g-s!


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    Last night my female Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus dug a hole underneath a hide and laid 2 eggs. I'm hoping these are good!!!
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
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    Awesome Elizabeth! Keep us posted!
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    I am a newbie here for real!

    Does anyone know whether Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus usually bury their eggs? The female left these 2 eggs in an inch deep hole, but uncovered.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    I kept C.p.zebraicus years ago, and found eggs both buried, un-buried and under cover.
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    18 June 2015:

    Both eggs are looking nice and round! In order to keep the RH more constant as well as the temperatures I moved them to an incubator set for 25*C (77*F). The temperatures will fluctuate some based upon room temperatures. I did not wish them to get too cool at night.

    EDIT:
    Lowered the temperature setting to 24*C (75*F)
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 06-25-2015 at 06:28 PM. Reason: tweaked based upon Dactylusfan's suggestion
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
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    Cool is way better than hot. A nighttime drop to 65F would not hurt them, just prolong the incubation period a little. Keep them humid and dry. They mold very easily if allowed to get wet. Just to allow yourself a little room for temperature fluctuation I would recommend keeping them at 75F. If your thermostat is a little off and it climbs to 80F you could lose the eggs. At 75F they should hatch within 90-120 days, but I had eggs go a lot longer, probably due to a nighttime drop in temp. Good luck! Keep us posted. As I stated before I would love to get another group of C.p.zebraicus in the future if your group does well! Glad to see there are people still working with them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dactylusfan View Post
    Cool is way better than hot. A nighttime drop to 65F would not hurt them, just prolong the incubation period a little. Keep them humid and dry. They mold very easily if allowed to get wet. Just to allow yourself a little room for temperature fluctuation I would recommend keeping them at 75F. If your thermostat is a little off and it climbs to 80F you could lose the eggs. At 75F they should hatch within 90-120 days, but I had eggs go a lot longer, probably due to a nighttime drop in temp. Good luck! Keep us posted. As I stated before I would love to get another group of C.p.zebraicus in the future if your group does well! Glad to see there are people still working with them.
    Based upon your recommendations I will tweak things a tad. Appreciate the advice to keep the eggs dry, yet humid. Since June 18 both eggs have been sitting on top of seramis in bottle caps. Perhaps I should move them to dry seramis? (The seramis had been boiled prior to placing the eggs upon it.)

    Both bottle caps sit on a ~4 cm deep bed of seramis inside a ventilated plastic box (inside a 2.5 gallon tank) with a digital's probe inside the plastic box. Water droplets are evident inside the plastic box.

    The eggs "look" OK right now.

    Thanks to the knowledgeable sharing of experiences like yours newbies don't need to start at Ground Zero.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 06-25-2015 at 06:31 PM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    My first experience hatching peguensis was by pure accident. I had purchased a group of 2.6 and had, what I thought was, three females in one enclosure, and the other three in a separate enclosure. I kept the males in individual enclosures. I wanted to allow the females to put on a little weight before trying to breed them. After about six months I was cleaning one of the cages and found a hatchling in the females' cage. after digging around in the substrate, which was very similar to the ABG mix that Josh's Frogs sells, I found the hatched egg and another that had not hatched yet. It eventually hatched after two days in a deli cup with damp perlite. I soon figured out that I had an extra male in the females' enclosure, so in fact I had 3.5. Later I would find more eggs and put them on dry perlite in a lid surrounded by moist sphagnum moss in a large deli container. I would keep them in a cool closet in my house that typically stayed around 75F. I also found out the hard way that they won't live for even the briefest exposure to temps over 80F. I was going to trade a juvenile pair with a friend and had them in a deli container, which I placed in a lunch cooler. It was a very warm day, so I started my car and had the A/C going. I picked my friend up and he pulled them out to look at them while still in the car. He sat them back in the cooler, but did not close the top. I dropped him off at his home and told him to take the cooler with him. Soon after returning home he called to tell me that they were both dead. I think the brief time out of the cooler and keeping the cooler open did them in. So be very cautious of too warm of temps!
    Last edited by Dactylusfan; 06-25-2015 at 10:29 AM.
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    My male sounds just like this:

    Watch as he then reacts to the recording of his own voice.

    ~~~thanks to jaona2
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
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    Yeah, I really miss hearing them call. The females respond as well, just not as loudly.
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