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    Default Extremely Aggressive Crested Gecko


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    One of our residents of my gecko rescue is an extremely aggressive male crested gecko around 8 years old.

    Before coming into the rescue, he wasn't well cared for living in an all screen cage with no interaction other than a time where he escaped for several days and dropped his tail when the owner's cats went after him. He was fed crickets occasionally and that's about it.

    He's been with us for about 5 months now and though all of his physical issues have been resolved; he is aggressive to the point that I may have to purchase gloves just to open his enclosure as he runs out and latches on to whatever piece of skin or clothing he can.

    Have already decided to not adopt him out as it isn't fair for anyone else to handle these behaviors but does anyone have tips on possibly mellowing him out? I am considering putting him in a slightly smaller enclosure to help him feel more secure and moving him out of the reptile room so he can't see/smell any of the other geckos.

    Thanks for any and all advice.
    The Gecko Sanctuary
    A small-scale rescue dedicated to helping geckos in need within the New England area
    www.geckosanctuary.org
    www.facebook.com/TheGeckoSanctuary

  2. #2
    mikew1234 is offline Junior member
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    I would recommend giving him cooler temps. It does not always work, but they can mellow out with the drop in temperature. If he does mellow out, then start handling him sparingly. It may not work, but is likely your best shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikew1234 View Post
    I would recommend giving him cooler temps. It does not always work, but they can mellow out with the drop in temperature. If he does mellow out, then start handling him sparingly. It may not work, but is likely your best shot.
    I imagine lowering the temps might mellow him out but that would be because his metabolism isn't working properly so would rather avoid that route if at all possible. During the day he is kept between 77-79 degrees and it drops to 74-76 at night.

    Am going to switch him to a slightly smaller enclosure with more foliage to see if it helps make him feel more secure and go from there.
    The Gecko Sanctuary
    A small-scale rescue dedicated to helping geckos in need within the New England area
    www.geckosanctuary.org
    www.facebook.com/TheGeckoSanctuary
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    Mogey is offline Newbie
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    It's up to you if you want to move him to a smaller enclosure, but I think you've got the right ticket by increasing the foliage. Lack of security is one of the most prominent reasons for Ciliatus (or any herp, for that matter) to become stressed or aggressive. Make him feel safe
    1.0.0 P. guttata guttata - Red Foreman
    0.2.0 Correlophus ciliatus
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    dptydog is offline Newbie
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    I've seen this before with cricket feed only crested. I'm sure he isn't use to being handled, but he has also been conditioned to react, open cage door =hunt food. I would recommend more foliage also no more live prey for quite some time cgd formula is more then enough to sustain him. Also the door should be opened daily without any food being giving. In essence we will train him to not go into a hunting mode as a response to happenings to his enclosure. Do this for about three weeks and report back with step 2.thats if you want my advice. Either way don't matter to me. Glad to see the rescue happen and hope to be of any help I can

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