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    Default A new species of lizard of the genus Eublepharis


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    Eublepharis satpuraensis sp. nov. has been described in a paper by Mirza et al. Dec 2014. Here's a link to the paper.
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    Very interesting, though it's surprising that they state in 2 places that the common name for all Eublepharids is "leopard gecko", and then go on to allude to other Eublepharid genera in places like the US (where I assume they're talking about Coloenyx).

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    Quote Originally Posted by acpart View Post
    Very interesting, though it's surprising that they state in 2 places that the common name for all Eublepharids is "leopard gecko", and then go on to allude to other Eublepharid genera in places like the US (where I assume they're talking about Coloenyx).

    Aliza
    I haven't read all of it yet but i did notice that as well, i think what they mean is all gecko's from the Eublepharis genus, instead of all Eublepharidae.
    I haven't seen or heard anybody refering to Aeluroscalabotes sp. as being a leopard gecko, their common name has always been cat gecko and i don't see it changing any time soon either.., same with Goniurosaurus and Hemitheconyx wich have always been cave gecko's and African fat tails.
    As far as i know the common name for the whole sub-family has always been eyelash gecko's instead of leopard gecko's.
    Last edited by Tamara; 12-26-2014 at 11:07 AM.
    E. macularius
    H. imbricatus
    C. pubisulcus
    C. ciliatus
    M. chahoua
    R. auriculatus
    B. cyclura
    S. ciliaris
    S. wellingtonae
    S. taenicauda
    S. spinigerus
    S. krisalys
    P. grandis
    P. abbotti chekei
    E. inunguis
    P. masobe
    p. picta
    U. henkeli
    U. lineatus
    U. sikorae
    U. sikorae
    Mt. d'Ambre
    U. phantasticus

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    It is an Indian paper, which are pretty well known for some scientific inaccuracies.

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    Marauderhex, you have the same thoughts of me. In the last page they list the material examined, list even E. fuscus. What made me confuse is it seems that E. fuscus was described in error, something like a 10 inches body lenght when in reality it is only 6. This paper agree with the old 10 inches body lenght description. I really guess there is something wrong.

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