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  1. #1
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    Default Proper substrate for cricket egg-laying??


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    I am new to cricket breeding. Everything seems to be going good EXCEPT the dirt/substrate/egg-laying medium I am using.

    I am using the technique where a small container of dirt is placed within the container of large crickets for 1 week then removed and put on heat to incubate.

    I had read (or seen on youtube) to use Miracle Gro Organic Garden Soil. So I bought that. I have been trying to keep it moist daily but it seems that the top layer of dirt gets hard like clay leaving the inner/lower dirt dry.

    What is everyone else using? I read about Eco-Earth but that seems to be a brand with many products. What product works for eggs?

    Thanks all.

  2. #2
    cricket4u's Avatar
    cricket4u is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by EyeintheSky57 View Post
    I am new to cricket breeding. Everything seems to be going good EXCEPT the dirt/substrate/egg-laying medium I am using.

    I am using the technique where a small container of dirt is placed within the container of large crickets for 1 week then removed and put on heat to incubate.

    I had read (or seen on youtube) to use Miracle Gro Organic Garden Soil. So I bought that. I have been trying to keep it moist daily but it seems that the top layer of dirt gets hard like clay leaving the inner/lower dirt dry.

    What is everyone else using? I read about Eco-Earth but that seems to be a brand with many products. What product works for eggs?

    Thanks all.
    Any coconut fiber should be okay. Eco- earth works fine for me.
    Currently keeping:

    Eublepharis gecko 2.1.0~Hemitheconyx gecko 1.0.0~Gekko gecko 1.0.0~Pogana Vitticeps 1.0.0~Varanus exanthematicus 1.1.0~Varanus acanthurus 1.0.0~Blue Tongue Skink 1.0.0~Red-eared slider 1.0.0

    Reptiles I have rehabilitated, rehomed or kept.
    All above species plus:


    Phelsuma Grandis~Rhacodactylus ciliatus~Paroedura~Rhacodactylus auriculatus ~Hemidactylus frenatus~Iguana~Turtles ~Snakes and too many more to name!
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  3. #3
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    Yep, just coco fiber and water, nothing else requires. Buy a brick, get it wet, grab a hand full, squeeze out excess water, put it in a deli cup, give it to the adult crickets, when you take it out put a single pin hole in the lid, put it in a warm location (not on direct heat), wait 10 days, bam! Pinheads galore.

    Maurice Pudlo
    To learn and to teach
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  4. #4
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    Thanks. Thats exactly what I ordered.

    Why the single pinhole?

  5. #5
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    Allows oxygen into the container. Allows excess water vapor to escape.

    Maurice Pudlo
    To learn and to teach

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    I poked a bunch of tiny holes. Could that let out too much humidity?

  7. #7
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    Place a section of paper towel over the lid, that will slow evaporation enough to get the job done.

    Maurice Pudlo
    To learn and to teach

  8. #8
    JMDaniels is offline Newbie
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    I always recommend peat moss for cricket eggs! The texture is very natural for retaining the right amount of moisture evenly from the surface to the layers underneath. Sometimes, when using soil or other substrates, the surface seems to keep all the moisture while just a couple inches underneath (where the eggs are) gets dry. Peat moss allows the moisture to spread evenly. It also means you don't have to spray it as often to keep it moist, since it does not dry out easily like other substrates.
    Repti-Love
    Raising Crickets

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