Page 13 of 17 FirstFirst ... 391011121314151617 LastLast
Results 121 to 130 of 162
  1. #121
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #116---Proportional Thermostats


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    (1) Spyder Robotics thermostats including the Intro ($99) and the Intro+ ($109)

    (2) HabiStat "pulse proportional" thermostats
    • Click: Habistat Pulse-Proportional Thermostat: Amazon.co.uk: Pet Supplies
    • Click: Thermostats
    • "The lights on the front flash at different rates indicating the power being pulsed to the appliance is maintaining a constant temperature. During the day mine flash on/off at a ratio of 50/50 and as the temperature slowly drops at night they flash more regularly. In either case the temperatures are maintained. I measure them with two different thermometers and verify a couple of times each day with an handheld temp gun.

      "I use two in the same Large Medium Exo Terra Terrarium (36 x 18 x 18 inches), one for my UTH (11 x 17 inches) and one for my CHE (150 watts) for my leopard gecko. Each one cost 40 GBPs so about 62 USDs or so, though it may very well be possible to find them cheaper. I bought a lot from one online store so got them from there while buying other products - Swell Reptiles."


      "Basically these stats (once you tell them what temp you want) pulse only the electricity needed to maintain that exact temperature and no more or no less. That is different from being either on full power until 3 >/< degrees over and then off until 3 >/< under. A pulse proportional stat is reportedly ideal for things like CHEs. It extends their lifespan enormously but basically it is designed to offer a more constant temperature with little to no fluctuation."

      Thanks to GU's Zux/Shane for his comments.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 07-26-2017 at 07:43 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #117 (& 60a)---Placement of UTHs & Heat Cables Inside Melamine/Wooden Leo Enclosures

    JIMI's setup for her leo Theseus:

    "I used ideas from post 60a as well and adapted them to my own viv. It's working very well for me. I have a heat cable sandwiched between two tiles and ventilated the space between the two tiles using 4 rubber feet I had left over from another UTH. I elevated the tiles using 4 glass cups and put decorative pebbles inside to make them look nicer. It just took a little creativity. "

    image (1).jpg

    image (4).jpg

    Scroll below to post 3 for JIMI's info.

    Click: Heat Mat - Wooden VIV

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    7 September 2016 update:

    "The raised platform has actually worked out pretty well for me! Like mecoat's leo, my leo Theseus really likes the dark space underneath. The ambient temperature underneath the platform is a couple degrees warmer than the cool side, so it gives him another option besides the 75F cool side. I use 18" x 18" (46 cm x 46 cm) porcelain tiles (less porous), which are a little bit more than 1/3 of the length of the enclosure. I attached a reptile heat cable underneath the top tile with foil tape that I've arranged so that part of the tile is in the 88-90F range and the other portion gives me temperatures around 86-88F. Using only the top tile, I found that the heat cable gave me some cold spots so I added the second tile to help insulate and distribute the heat more evenly across the tiles.

    "I hope that was helpful and good luck with your new leo!"
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 07-08-2017 at 03:30 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #118---Calcium + Magnesium: Repashy's RescueCal+ Instructions -- Summer 2015

    Repashy's RescueCal+ contains both calcium and magnesium.

    Repashy's RescueCal+ instructions:
    Liquid Calcium Supplement

    NET WEIGHT 3 OZ / 84 GR

    "Our RescueCal + is a highly bio available and concentrated liquid calcium (when dissolved in water) supplement fortified with magnesium.

    INFORMATION: A highly bio available and highly concentrated Liquid Calcium supplement (once dissolved in water) with added Magnesium and Electrolytes used to supplement animals with low blood calcium levels as a result of Calcium and/or Vitamin D deficiency. The only liquid Calcium on the market with added Magnesium (10:1 ratio).

    INGREDIENTS: Calcium Lactate Gluconate, Magnesium Lactate, Sucrose, Potassium Citrate, Malic Acid, Sodium Chloride, Potassium Sorbate (preservative). Analysis (Dry): Calcium 8.4%, Magnesium .825%, Sodium .32%, Potassium .23%, Chloride .34%, Sucrose 14%.

    Analysis (when mixed to directions): Sucrose 40 mg / mL, Calcium 25 mg / mL, Magnesium 2.5 mg / mL, Sodium 1mg / mL, Potassium .7mg / mL, Chloride .1 mg / mL.

    Usage: Can be added to feed (as solution, or dry), water, syringe fed, or dropped into mouth. Use as prescribed by your Veterinarian. For oral use only. Solution is not injectable. Once mixed, solution should be discarded after 3 months.

    Tips: 1 mL = 1 cc = 20 drops.

    DIRECTIONS: This product is designed to be mixed into a 30% solution. (3 g / 10 mL, 30 g / 100 mL, 300 g / L). You can mix only what you need but amounts less than 100 mL will require very accurate measurement. YOU WILL NEED A SCALE TO USE THIS PRODUCT ACCURATELY. Add half total desired volume of water to container, then add weighed amount of RescueCal + to water while stirring, and then top off water to desired volume. It can take up to 30 minutes for the minerals to fully dissolve in water. Starting with HOT water will decrease this time but is not necessary.

    Refrigeration will extend freshness

    NOT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Made in USA"
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 07-27-2017 at 03:01 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #119---UVB Lighting for Leopard Geckos:Only with ~48 inch + long vivarium...GU's JIMI

    Exo Terra : Light Cycle Unit / Electronic Dimming Terrarium Lamp Controller

    /\ "The unit above is the one I purchased and what I am considering repurchasing. I'd use it with a 15 watt Reptisun 5.0 UVB fluorescent tube. I was previously using a 15 watt Repti Glo 2.0 bulb, but to ensure that he was synthesizing D3 without the help of any supplement containing D3 cricket4u suggested that I switch to a stronger bulb. The dimensions of his vivarium are 48"l x 21"w x 24"h. The heated tile that the strip is positioned above is about 15" below the lamp and he has a raised tile that gets him about 5" closer."

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    14 November 2015:

    "Unfortunately, I'm currently not using UVB lighting in my enclosure right now. You might recall that I purchased the Exo Terra light unit in attempts to find a new position for the tube, but when I received it the unit was not functional. I haven't purchased another unit yet, but I plan to hopefully soon. I've been looking into other options. I've been having a hard time finding dimmable units available here in the US! (if anyone is aware of any please let me know! )

    "In the period that I did use it though, I did notice my leo make use of the light. I have a plant with broad leaves positioned near the strip and I frequently found him underneath it with his head and most of his body in the shade, but with some also exposed to the light. He has plenty of other hide options besides this plant. Even without the light I still catch him under this plant on occasion. Other ways he'd have some exposure to the light was by leaving some of his tail sticking out of the hide as he slept. He was eating very well, had regular bowel movements, and I think I also noticed an improvement in his activity levels and a brighter color.

    "I agree, I don't think that it is a good idea to use a UVB light in a small tank, especially combined with a supplement containing vitamin D3. I personally prefer to use UVB because he has plenty of areas to completely escape the rays if he wishes to. It's weird that the vet suggested using UVB; I think he should have at least gone over bulb strength and proper use because serious damage can be caused by improper use and the dangerous bulbs that are available right now.

    "Here's some info from Arcadia that I found useful about UVB lighting for leos and how to set up a proper photo gradient if anyone's interested:
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 07-08-2017 at 03:45 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #120---2010 Metabolic Bone Disease PDF: Improvement is Possible!!!

    PDF written in 2010: A Fresh Look at Metabolic Bone Diseases in Reptiles and Amphibians......Eric Klaphake, DVM




    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    RyoDai89's leopard gecko Boomie rehabbing

    Boomie walks considerably "taller" than before.

    Thread: Leo acting strange...



    DiscoverLight's leopard gecko rehabbed

    Thread: I rescued a gecko, this is her progress

    DiscoverLight left pure calcium carbonate in a dish 24/7. She says that "The leo practically licked her calcium dish clean for the few months I've had her so it's gotten better. "

    In addition DiscoverLight dusted some prey with calcium + D3. I hope to find out which brand.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 09-07-2017 at 11:32 PM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #121---"Leopard Gecko Diseases and Care"......2015 Pacific Veterinary Conference

    Authors: Thomas H. Boyer, DVM, DABVP (Reptile & Amphibian Practice); Michael M. Garner, DVM, DACVP; Drury R. Reavill, DVM, DABVP (Avian); DACVP; Zachary J. Steffes, DVM.

    This is conference note is from the 2015 Pacific Veterinary Conference.

    Click: https://newcms.eventkaddy.net/event_...0512213140.pdf

    REFERENCES
    "This article was previously published and used with permission. See Boyer T, Garner M, Reavill D, Steffes Z. Common problems of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius). Proc ARAV. 2014:117–125, for references and full article."


    Thanks to Susan Kaisaki's share (leo Poppy's keeper).
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 12-22-2015 at 04:52 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #122---Water Treatment Precautions......GU's amsdadtodd (Todd) -- Jan 2016

    Click: Should I put my Leopard Gecko on a diet?

    "Beware, not all filtered water is as good as you'd think. Some types of ion exchange filters soften water by "trading" chemicals to soften water. Honestly, most hard water can be softened just by boiling it."

    post 23:
    "I believe hard vs soft water is really the wrong discussion to have as it relates to leopard gecko health.

    "Water that is considered hard contains higher levels of calcium and magnesium salts than that which is considered soft. It should be noted that that these salts are minerals which we strive to keep in the diets of our pets. I don't use any softening techniques for my pets. I'll explain why a bit later.

    "There are actually two kinds of hardness: carbonate hardness and permanent hardness. Carbonate hardness is the result of calcium bicarbonate and magnesium bicarbonate salts dissolved in the water. These salts are easily broken down by boiling, resulting in a reduction of the overall hardness of the water. Permanent hardness is the result of sulphate and chloride salts, and these can only be removed by more aggressive softening techniques, such as ion exchange, distillation, or RO/DI (Reverse Osmosis/De-Ionization).

    "All three of these softening techniques have their risks. It's important to understand them before considering whether or not to employ them. Ion exchange is performed by passing water through a resinous material rich in sodium and/or potassium to replace the calcium and magnesium ions. The most commonly available ion exchange systems are "softener pillows" which are porous bags of resinous granules designed to either pour water through, or soak in a container of water to be softened. The net effect this has on our pets is alarming. It basically removes essential chemical elements like calcium and replaces them with chemicals which are intended to decrease those vital minerals inside their bodies. In other words, using ion exchange softened water is likely to remove calcium and magnesium from our leos' bodies. I don't know if this effect is sufficient enough to actually cause MBD, but I'm certainly not going to find out the hard way!

    "Distilled water and RO/DI water both have largely the same risks. They are so purified that when they are ingested, they may leach nutrients from the tissues they pass through. In other words, the absence of any dissolved compounds in a solution creates an imbalance when it passes through the body of any organism. That imbalance is resolved by robbing dissolved minerals from the body tissue. This can lead to degradation of intestinal walls to the point of causing diarrhea. The same goes for humans. If we drink this ultra-pure water, it will sicken us quickly.

    "The first part of the RO/DI process, stand alone Reverse Osmosis, is becoming more common and less costly. It's also less aggressive and probably less detrimental than the other methods.

    "My personal preference is to not use any water softening methods. The tap water where I live is quite hard and has been chlorinated at the treatment plant. I use ReptiSafe water conditioner drops to remove any chlorine before pouring tap water into the water bowls. I wash the water bowls once a week with Dawn dish soap. There is no scale building up in the water dishes, but even if there was it's not a problem for our pets. The only other water I use for my pets is for spraying the moist hides. I have store bought spring water on hand which I use to spray many of the plants I keep in my herp room. I use this same water for the moist hides."

    I hope this helps!
    Todd
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 03-21-2016 at 03:23 AM. Reason: 7 Jan 2016 tweak
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Thanks ColleenT thanked for this post

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #123---Taming your Leopard Gecko......GU's mecoat, Zux (Shane), & others

    Leos can be very skittish. Don't scoop up your leo from above like an eagle would. That's what a predator would do! With your palm facing up, slide your fingers/hand underneath your leopard gecko's belly. Then lift.

    • Let your leo settle in. He should be eating and pooping regularly before trying this.
    • When approaching his cage, always speak quietly. Move slowly so as not to startle him.
    • Avoid sudden movements. They will spook your leo.
    • Next visit place your hand in the cage palm facing up. See whether he'll walk up to it.
    • Try that on several different days.
    • See whether he'll come up and sniff/lick your fingers. Maybe he'll climb on your hand.
    • If this goes well, with your palm facing up gently slide your fingers underneath his belly and lift him.
    • Judge your progress by your leo's reaction.
    • Remember baby steps. Don't rush it.

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    mecoat -- Nov 2016

    "Start with talking to your leo when you're feeding him, so he recognizes your voice and associates it with food, and non-scary stuff.

    "Once he's used to that, add your hand in at the far side of the viv from him, talk at the same time. You may want to try having a mealworm on your hand at this point, so he might feel he'll come for the food.

    "Once he's used to that, slowly add your hand closer to him.

    "Once he's used to that, he may climb on board to get at the mealworm, don't pick him up at this point, let him get used to the fact that the hand isn't scary.

    "Once he's used to coming on board, then you can try picking him up. Keep an eye on his body language and breathing rate, if you think he's starting to panic, keep calm yourself and pop him back in the viv near a hide so he can skuttle in there if he wants.

    "Always be aware of him, and stay calm. (Beware if he strikes for a mealworm on your hand, try not to jump yourself). Slow and steady for taming."

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    Zux -- Jan 2016

    "I have gathered the following information from taming a number of different Geckos with wildly varied personalities and tolerances of human contact. This is by no means the only way to do things.

    The first thing to remember when trying to tame any Gecko is that they all have distinct personalities. Anything you have read about a particular keeper's experience may or may not apply to you.

    None of the taming process is scripted. It is wise for us to be respectful and to go at a pace comfortable for the individual at hand. Forcing things too quickly is likely to have a negative mental impact on the Gecko and, believe it or not, they do remember these (sometimes forever).

    With that said there are some rules which you can/should always follow while taming your pet.

    • When close to your reptile never make sudden/jerky movements. This instantly triggers a flight response in all Geckos irrespective of their personalities. In other words - They all hate it.
    • When close to your reptile speak at a reasonable volume. Shouting or other loud noises tend to startle and/or stress them out, making them less receptive to handling or anything but hiding. Getting them used to your voice is very useful long term.
    • When taming any Gecko do so at a time they are normally comfortable being awake and outside of their favorite hides. For example, a Leopard Gecko or African Fat Tail will likely not wish to come to your hand for any reason including food bribes during daylight hours as this is a time they normally stay hidden, compounding the stress of your presence further.
    • When introducing your hand to the Gecko, and assuming you're not fortunate enough to have a terrarium with front opening doors, then let him/her see the hand coming from as far away as possible. In other words, just don't reach in from the air above the gecko as this is seen by them as predatory behavior and instantly makes them wary!

    Keep these rules in mind as you begin the sometimes lengthy process of taming your Gecko. As I hinted at earlier this may take a very short or a very long time (likely somewhere in between) depending upon the Gecko's personality and how careful you are throughout the process.

    For example, I have one Leopard Gecko who is now almost 10 months old and will still instantly flee to her hide at the sound of even my voice despite hearing it every night and tolerating handling itself very well. Some of them are just nervous individuals and this in most cases can still be worked with, though there are rare exceptions.

    In contrast to that, another Leopard Gecko I have took no taming at all, and I mean none! She came and ate from my hand the first night I placed her in her terrarium. The next morning she instantly crawled onto my hand, up my arm, and out of her environment. I have yet to see a single sign of fear months later. No matter what happens even her breathing doesn't elevate.

    My point is that Geckos can be vastly different even with the exact same care from the owner. Don't worry if things do not go as quickly as you'd like. Some things, as with humans, take time.


    Follow, then repeat, these steps one by one until your Gecko is totally OK with each of them.

    1. Step 1: After you have given the Gecko one to two weeks to settle in and begin functioning normally, begin to familiarize them with your sight and sound. Sit by the tank when you know they can see you and talk to them, a little softly but not too far from what they are going to hear daily from now on. This will help your new pet realize you are not there to hunt them. Do this at night as often and for as long as you have time. A friend of mine studies and reads books aloud next to his African Fat Tail Gecko's terrarium.
    2. Step 2: Now that your Gecko is used to your presence, get him/her used to your smell and your hand. Begin by slowly placing your hand (palm down) on the floor of the terrarium. See if they will come to investigate. This may take a long time. If this isn't working or stopped working, move your hand to the door of the hide. Wait for them to come and investigate. Position your hand so that if your Gecko wishes to leave its hide it must walk across your hand. I have yet to see a gecko that, without due patience, won't come and at least look at your hand to see what it is. They are naturally curious. However, please note that some may take significantly longer than others to show any interest. Patience WILL be required. Getting the Gecko to realize that your hand is absolutely zero threat to them is your aim. Developing real trust with your hand enables further taming throughout the next stages. It's highly advisable but not a prerequisite to wait until the Gecko walks onto your hand by itself before moving forward with the next steps.
    3. Step 3: Once your Gecko has no fear of walking onto your hand, slowly lift it off the ground. Do this slowly. Only lift it a couple of inches at first before slowly placing it back down. This allows the Gecko to get used to the sensation.
    4. Step 4: The next step is some short hand walking. Once your gecko is on your hand lift it up. Slowly place your second hand in front of your Gecko as it begins to try to walk off the lifted hand. Judge your Gecko's comfort level by the speed at which it walks. If it slowly ambles from hand to hand continue this for 30 seconds or so. Otherwise, as soon as it begins to run, carefully lower your hand and place the gecko back on the ground in a secure spot. Repeat this until you can get the Gecko to calmly walk between the hands at least 10 times. At first the Gecko may not even like walking once, but this will improve with time.
    5. Step 5: Next up is getting the Gecko used to not just your hand, but to your touch. Once your Gecko is comfortable climbing on and over your hand, start very slowly touching it. I gently stroke its side with a finger, because that's the place it would be lifted up from when it comes to handling. Generally speaking, once your Gecko is used to your hand and sees your touch coming, it won't react badly to very light contact. Repeat this until you can tell that the Gecko is not frightened by touch. Try different areas such as the back and top of the head. Always be gentle and avoid the tail. Mistakes here can push taming backwards, so pay attention and be gentle.
    6. Step 6: The next and final step is picking up your Gecko. Note I did not say grabbing your Gecko! That isn't and never will be something I suggest doing, no matter the situation.

      Using as many fingers as the space between your Gecko's legs allow, very gently push your fingers underneath his/her belly while doing the same with your thumb from the other side. If you're doing this while they are laying down, make sure that you do not pinch his/her skin. With your fingers and thumb under the belly supporting your Gecko, gently lift the Gecko out of the vivarium.

    So that covers the basics. Once you have gone through all of these stages and allowed a sufficient amount of time within each for your gecko to become accustomed the the new experiences, it becomes a matter of repetition in order to fully tame your Gecko.

    As a final note I can't stress enough the importance of patience and of trying to look at things from their point of view. Rushing things like this with reptiles only has negative consequences on their long term tolerance to handling and to people in general.

    Be aware when your Gecko is not happy or feeling scared. Quick pulsing of the throat almost always indicates increased fear! Extra care should be taken when your Gecko is feeling this way. Likewise when they move in sudden bursts and stay deathly still between those they are behaving defensively and shouldn't be stressed further. If you are somewhat informed as to how they normally move and act, you can make more effective decisions on how you behave around them and minimize the negative experiences they associate you with.

    Good Luck"
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 02-18-2019 at 05:20 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Likes StineMo, HippieGirl, catflint, Zux liked this post

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #124--Weekly Feeding & Supplement Schedule for leopard geckos 0-12 months old

    • Use Zoo Med's Repti Calcium with D3 at 1 feeding per week. Lightly dust it on most every insect at that feeding.
    • Use Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins without D3 at 1 feeding per week. Lightly dust it on most every insect at that feeding.
    • Use plain precipitated calcium carbonate at 1 feeding per week. Lightly dust it on crickets or dubia. Precipitated calcium carbonate is purer than oyster shell calcium. The NOW brand sold in health foods stores is ideal.

    These schedules depend upon feeding a good quality dry diet to your insects and worms 24/7. Finely grind Zoo Med's Natural ADULT Bearded Dragon Food (or an equivalent high quality dry diet) to feed the bugs and worms. That covers the basics. Then supplement this 24/7 dry diet occasionally with high calcium, low phosphorus, leafy greens: collard, mustard, and turnip greens, and pesticide-free dandelion flowers and greens. Vary your leopard gecko's diet. Crickets, Blaptica dubia, hornworms, Phoenix worms, and silkworms are all good.

    Nutritional Comparisons of Insects & Worms


    Weekly Schedule 124 for Leopard Geckos 0-12 months old
    (without UVB)

    repticalciumwd3.jpg + 5777.jpg + 5774.jpg OR 49151.jpg
    (click to enlarge)

    • Crickets or dubia >> Monday - lightly dusted with Zoo Med's Repti Calcium with D3
    • Mealworms >> Tuesday
    • Crickets or dubia >> Wednesday - lightly dusted with pure precipitated calcium carbonate without D3 (Zoo Med's Repti Calcium or NOW human brand calcium)
    • Crickets or dubia >> Thursday
    • Crickets or dubia >> Friday - lightly dusted with Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins without D3
    • Mealworms >> Saturday
    • No food or free choice >> Sunday
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 03-06-2019 at 11:28 PM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    20,394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Tagged
    8 Thread(s)

    Smile #125---Weekly Feeding & Supplement Schedule for leopard geckos 12-18 months old


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Here goes:

    Weekly Schedule 125 for leopard geckos 12-18 months old
    (without UVB)

    Powdered supplement recommendations for leopard geckos 12-18 months old depend upon how much your leo has grown thus far and whether he/she is walking strongly. Leos usually reach maximum size at about 18 months old.

    repticalciumwd3.jpg + 5777.jpg + 5774.jpg OR 49151.jpg
    (click to enlarge)

    Feed lightly dusted prey 3x per week.

    • Crickets or dubia >> Monday - lightly dusted with Zoo Med's Repti Calcium with D3
    • Crickets or dubia >> Wednesday - lightly dusted with pure precipitated calcium carbonate without D3 (Zoo Med's Repti Calcium or NOW human brand calcium)
    • Crickets or dubia >> Friday - lightly dusted with Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins without D3
    • Mealworms >> Saturday . . . . . . maybe
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 05-10-2019 at 05:07 PM.

Page 13 of 17 FirstFirst ... 391011121314151617 LastLast

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •