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  1. #1
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    Default What behavioral changes should I expect during breeding season?


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    So Iím a very new Leo owner, and I havenít had any Leos during breeding season before. I was worried about some behavior and I was told it was probably just breeding season, so I tried to research it but there isnít much from what I could find.

    I want to know what to expect from my make and females (none of whom share a tank). Already the male has seemed a bit more territorial and he spends a lot of time looking at where my femaleís tank is kept. Are there any other behavioral changes I should expect? How long do these last? How can you tell if a female is ovulating? Is there anything special I should do to make them more comfortable?

    I also want to breed once I have the time, money, and experience (as in, keeping at least 3 adults and raising a baby and keeping them for at least four or five years), so are there any signs that a Leo is ready to breed?

  2. #2
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    You can google to see pictures of ovulation. Some females don't eat much when ovulation starts. If males can smell a female they may get a little overactive, but it's no big deal. It's likely that by the summer all these behaviors will calm down. Here's an article I wrote about gecko behavior throughout the year that also discusses ovulation behavior changes:
    The Yearly Cycle with Geckos - Gecko Time - Gecko Time

    Aliza

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    So I know my female is ovulating (I can actually see the little unfertilized eggs in her belly) and she’s been off feed for a little over a week at this point. How long should I expect her to be off feed? Aka, when should I start worrying? She’s a bit on the chunky side so I’m not worried about her starving (honestly she could probably go at least two months without food before she started to become underweight), but I would like to know when I should start trying to get her to eat more aggressively- all I do now is wiggle a large cricket or large smooshed head superworm in front of her to see if she has any interest.

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    Just keep doing what you're doing. She'll eat eventually, though I can't tell you when . It's been a really long time for some of my geckos. They are very hardy.

    Aliza

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    Okay. Is it normal for ovulating females to become more lethargic? She’s still wandering around and drinking but she’s spending a lot more time sleeping than normal. Usually I see her wander about her cage during the day so she can get into a different position but she just sleeps a lot.

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    It depends on the gecko!

    Aliza

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    Quote Originally Posted by acpart View Post
    Just keep doing what you're doing. She'll eat eventually, though I can't tell you when . It's been a really long time for some of my geckos. They are very hardy.

    Aliza
    Good news! After two and a half weeks without eating, she’s eating again! I didn’t have large crickets on hand (the other adults ate the last of them today) so I let her eat some large superworms. She ate 14. I got a cute pic of her begging for food too!

    0D4F9B7D-8FDE-4A31-A153-3E508452014C.jpg
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    Great news! As you can see, they eat when they're ready. I have to say, it's a lot worse with children.

    Aliza

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    AE5139A1-0FFD-4163-ACD0-0985A9C8B747.jpg

    So. I was changing their reptile carpets and I forgot that I had also placed my female on my bed when I placed my make on the bed (she hid). I turn around and their actually circling each other. I was about to jump in when my boy’s tail started going like a rattlesnake. The female actually twitched her tail tip in response and laid down. I stepped in when the male started to climb on her- I can’t afford to care for baby geckos.

    It was really fascinating to watch- especially since my female is pretty aggressive. I’m assuming that what I witnessed was a sort of courting behavior? I know tail rattling is a courting behavior, but I didn’t realize that the female would give a sign she was okay. She licked his tail once or twice too. I think there were a few gentle nips, but there was no skin breaking.

    I know I might be asking the obvious, but it that behavior normal for geckos about to breed?

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    Yes it is. Hopefully you caught them in time!

    Aliza

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