Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default My Leopard pair's first set of viable eggs!


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Hi there! New to the forum. I have a male and female leopard. Both our at least 3 years old (that's when I adopted them). I genuinely have no idea regarding what morphs they are. Hoping to get some photos uploaded soon to get some input in that. In the meantime, I recently decided to house them together in a one half of a 60 gallon tank, basically in hopes of allowing them to breed. Last month she laid her first pair of (viable) eggs inside the moist/hot hide box that I made. I discovered them within a day or two. Marked the tops and carefully moved them to a temp/humidity controlled incubation container that I'd fabricated ahead of time. It's now been 35 days and all seems to be going well. I do have a couple of questions though... When candling, what exactly should I be looking for? I've been checking about once a week, but have yet to really make anything out. Also, should I expect the eggs to harden at some point? They're still very soft and moist to touch. But they're also still nice and plump. No denting, shriveling, smells, etc. From everything I've read about viability/fertility, I assume that I would know by now if they weren't going to be a successful hatch. Am I wrong? Are there any other indicators that I should be looking for?

    I appreciate y'alls input and feedback. And thanks for welcoming me to your group! 😀

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Somerville, MA
    Posts
    6,931
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Welcome and congrats! I advise against too much handling of the eggs. The eggs are not always hard the way chicken eggs are, so they may be OK. I've also had eggs that looked great turn out to be infertile and eggs that didn't look so good hatch out healthy geckos. The only way to really deal with it is to incubate every egg until it either hatches or stinks and try to find other things to occupy your mind other than what's going to happen with the eggs (it's hard, I know from experience). One caution: if you plan to sell the offspring, you will need to label them as "pet only" because you will have no idea what their genetic heritage is.

    Aliza
    Thanks IHaveNoIdea thanked for this post

User Tag List

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •