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  1. #1
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    Default My Daughter and I


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    So Gecko Mamma is my Daughter and I will be her shaparon here. She was gifted 2 Tangerine Geckos last night from a friend. These 2 femals are now bedding with our current 2 males both Leopard Gecko's.
    So we are still new to Gecko's and the 2 males we own have been with us for the last 2 years now. We are looking for information on Breading. We are looking for items we would need, and tips on how we watch over the egg's once this happens. Not sure it will happen but for now we are hopeful and more then anything just enjoying these cool creatures. They have been a blast to own and fun to watch grow. Thanks for any help and advice in advance.20191221_172615.jpg
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  2. #2
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    Congrats on your new geckos! The first thing you should do if at all possible, believe it or not, is to separate the females from the males and let them be on their own for at least a month. Quarantining new geckos is important in case they have a health problem. In addition, before you set up the geckos to breed, it's good to know what to expect, so you don't have to rush to get things ready at the last minute. When I was breeding, I would put my males and females together around mid-January, would get the first eggs around February, many of which did not hatch, and would get the first hatchlings around April. Two female geckos could produce anywhere from 0-40 babies total. You will need to think about feeding and housing this many geckos. For now, google "leopard gecko breeding" and read as much as you can. The things you need to look into specifically to begin with include incubators and breeding behavior of the adults.
    I hope you continue to have an interesting and positive experience

    Aliza

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by acpart View Post
    Congrats on your new geckos! The first thing you should do if at all possible, believe it or not, is to separate the females from the males and let them be on their own for at least a month. Quarantining new geckos is important in case they have a health problem. In addition, before you set up the geckos to breed, it's good to know what to expect, so you don't have to rush to get things ready at the last minute. When I was breeding, I would put my males and females together around mid-January, would get the first eggs around February, many of which did not hatch, and would get the first hatchlings around April. Two female geckos could produce anywhere from 0-40 babies total. You will need to think about feeding and housing this many geckos. For now, google "leopard gecko breeding" and read as much as you can. The things you need to look into specifically to begin with include incubators and breeding behavior of the adults.
    I hope you continue to have an interesting and positive experience

    Aliza

    Thank you so much we will take this all into consideration and will be looking deeper into it all.

  4. #4
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    First off, Gorgeous geckos!! they do seem a bit young to breed still tho judging by the pictures. do you keep your males separate from eachother?

    There are tons an tons of videos on youtube
    Geopard Leckos Leopard Geckos, say that 10 times fast!

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    Yes we keep the males in different tanks learned that the hard way. They do fine with the females and the friend that gave them to us said the same thing. They look small to bread but I guess time will tell.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gecko Momma View Post
    Yes we keep the males in different tanks learned that the hard way. They do fine with the females and the friend that gave them to us said the same thing. They look small to bread but I guess time will tell.
    My only worry would be the males getting aggressive with the females trying to get them to mate. I have seen some really upsetting photos of females with missing limbs an tails and crushed skulls. When i pair my geckos i put the male into the females enclosure and observe the ritual and once over i put him back till the next day an i'll do that for a week or two an observe the females reactions to him, if shes had enough she lets him know an i remove him. now thats just the way i do it because i dont want any one to get hurt an maybe im over parenting but it works for me.. A lot of people do it differently and im not saying my way is right or their way is wrong or my way is better, its just how i do it.
    Geopard Leckos Leopard Geckos, say that 10 times fast!

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