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    Default General breeding questions (I wasnt able to find with google)


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    Hi I've been reading up on leopard gecko breeding but two questions I havent been able to find the answer for.

    1. Female leopard geckos can produce several clutches per season. But how many clutches are produced from one pairing? As in do the geckos produce more than one clutch from a one time pairing? So do they retain sperm, or otherwise produce several clutches.

    2. I've read up on breeding practices but I have not been able to find a very concrete answer on this. When linebreeding what are the exact proper numbers of how to avoid 'inbred' health problems. Do you not breed related at all? So do you then need to buy or otherwise procure every new partner? If not, what's the basic formula of proper ratio of breeding related or unrelated gecko's.

    thanks!

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    1. Leopard geckos do retain sperm. The number of clutches they'll produce after 1 pairing is variable, probably at least 3. When I was breeding I did have a situation where the male had only 1 encounter with the female and I think she went on to lay quite a large number of clutches.

    2. I don't think there's a really scientific practice about how many generations are OK for inbreeding. In general, I think people breed related geckos (i.e. offspring back to parent or siblings) for a generation and then try to outcross the next generation. If you work up to, say 2 males and 2 females, and then you want to add breeders, you should be able to accomplish that with offspring because you'll have a large enough population to inbreed and outcross to produce additional breeders.

    Aliza
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    (double post) edit
    Last edited by Dutch; 02-17-2020 at 07:03 AM.

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    What are the ethics of discarding eggs? So not incubating fertile eggs, discarding right after being layed. If you would have to many to care for at that moment.

    Is that accepted? Is there an animal already in the egg, right after it's layed?

    Or does it develop only after incubating, would discarding eggs be ethical/good?

    (not talking about infertile eggs, but fertile ones)

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    Some of the ethics depend on your general view about the status of pre-born creatures. When the egg is laid, a fertile egg will show (when candled) a red spot with a round red circle. I'd guess it would be a situation of a small number of not yet differentiated cells (though I have no way to really know). The biggest issue, in my opinion, about discarding fertile eggs is that it's throwing away something that has cost the gecko physical resources. I don't necessarily think that's unethical. Another choice would be to see if there's someone in your area that would want the fertile eggs. I also think it's important that a person do only what they can realistically do, so this may be a reasonable choice for you.

    Aliza

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