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    Default Helping a female lay eggs


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    My girl is now 2 years old and has been doing great. Last year she stopped eating for a few months, lost most of her tail weight (about 20g), then finally laid two unfertilized eggs. They were quite firm and the second had a good amount of calcification on it - more than I would have expected for a reptile egg.

    She ate like a pig for the entire winter, gained all the weight back plus some. About a month ago she stopped eating again, and now she is bloated, cranky, and appears to have eggs again. She has a dig box, on the warm side, that is kept moist.

    Is there anything that I should or can do that will help her pass these faster or at least prevent her from becoming egg bound?

    This is last years egg (laid august 10th, 2021)

    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...2/IMG_2834.JPG
    Nature is the best teacher, learn by observing

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    I'm not sure there's much you can do. Just don't mess with her and keep checking discretely. If you get worried about her because it seems different than last year, contact a vet.

    Aliza

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    Update: Nel laid her eggs tonight. At least this time they are soft and squishy - with the normal pliable leathery texture they are supposed to have. Since this is only the second time she has done this, does it usually take 3 months from ovulation to producing eggs? I know the process and signs of building follicles in ball pythons, but geckos are probably a little different.

    She stopped eating in April and over about 3 weeks got noticeably bloated, the white outline of the eggs was visible after about 6/1 or so. Since it took her so long last year and the eggs were hard, I've been watching her like a hawk, making sure both her moist hide and nest box are warm and humid to prevent dehydration etc. She also only lost about 10g this time, and was sitting in her food bowl looking for snacks. (She was licking the calcium out of the bottom from where it's fallen off bugs, that is actually why I checked her hides, this is the first time in months shes been interested in food. Since this started shes eaten almost nothing but does lick some of the supplements off the bugs and feeding dish every now and then).

    On that note...I use Elizabeth's supplement schedule WITH UVB for them, but does she need extra calcium for a few weeks to replenish, or is the maintenance schedule sufficient?

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachm...465&height=620
    Last edited by SpottedDragon; 07-17-2022 at 10:17 PM.
    Nature is the best teacher, learn by observing
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpottedDragon View Post
    Update: Nel laid her eggs tonight. At least this time they are soft and squishy - with the normal pliable leathery texture they are supposed to have. Since this is only the second time she has done this, does it usually take 3 months from ovulation to producing eggs? I know the process and signs of building follicles in ball pythons, but geckos are probably a little different.

    She stopped eating in April and over about 3 weeks got noticeably bloated, the white outline of the eggs was visible after about 6/1 or so. Since it took her so long last year and the eggs were hard, I've been watching her like a hawk, making sure both her moist hide and nest box are warm and humid to prevent dehydration etc. She also only lost about 10g this time, and was sitting in her food bowl looking for snacks. (She was licking the calcium out of the bottom from where it's fallen off bugs, that is actually why I checked her hides, this is the first time in months shes been interested in food. Since this started shes eaten almost nothing but does lick some of the supplements off the bugs and feeding dish every now and then).

    On that note...I use Elizabeth's supplement schedule WITH UVB for them, but does she need extra calcium for a few weeks to replenish, or is the maintenance schedule sufficient?

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachm...465&height=620
    Well done, Nel & SpottedDragon!

    I don't know how long it normally takes from ovulation to producing eggs. I'm sure Aliza does.

    Does Nel regularly bask under her UVB? IF so, I recommend leaving a small dish of plain calcium carbonate available in her enclosure 24/7.

    Have you been using Schedule 156 + supplementing with D3 calcium 1-2x monthly even with UVB? How about using Schedule 155 until Nel regains her 10 grams lost weight?

    UVB Weekly Schedule 156 for leopard geckos 18 months old +
    (with UVB)

    ***** It's crucial for your leopard gecko to have an enclosure larger than a 10 gallon (20 x 10.5 x 12 inches tall) prior to experimenting with UVB. There are downsides to UVB too.

    A 20 long: 30 x 12 x 12 inches tall IS the bare minimum enclosure size when providing UVB for any leopard gecko! A leo will need at least 3 hides to dodge the rays when he feels the urge. *****

    The medical term for Metabolic Bone Disease = Nutritional Secondary HyperParathyroidism. NSHP symptoms include leaning to one side when walking, walking on one or both "elbows", bowed limbs, belly dragging, and an underbite. Difficulty chewing should be closely monitored.
    *** A Ferguson Zone Index of 0.5-1.0 based upon measurements from a Solarmeter 6.5R is required at a leopard gecko's UVB basking site! ***
    The Reptile Supply Company (916-226-4089) based in Lodi, California stocks Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3.
    Leopard geckos usually reach maximum size at about 18 months old.

    Feed lightly dusted prey 2x per week.


    • Monday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3
    • Thursday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with pure precipitated calcium carbonate withOUT D3 (Zoo Med's Repti Calcium or NOW's human-grade pure calcium carbonate)
    • Saturday > > Optional: mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting


    ***** When your leopard gecko is taking advantage of appropriate UVB rays, Dr. Fran Baines DVM strongly recommends a backup dose of powdered D3 @ 1-2 feedings per month! Just substitute 1 D3 calcium dusting for 1 plain calcium dusting during those 1-2 weeks only. *****
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 07-18-2022 at 11:56 PM.
    Click: Leopard Gecko Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Gekko kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (Phelsuma barbouri) ~ (Lygodactylus kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    IF available & based upon their high calcium content, hornworms would be an excellent addition to Nel's diet.

    My local PetCo carries hornworms in 4-packs. Be sure to read this link for care instructions to slow down excessive growth!

    For link 33 click: Hornworm Care Guidelines
    Click: Leopard Gecko Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Gekko kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (Phelsuma barbouri) ~ (Lygodactylus kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    I have been using that schedule but different days. Nel basks more than Wyrm (nearly daily), but they are both consistently out often enough that I feel comfortable just giving d3 twice a month.

    Sun = repti-vite w/o d3
    Wed = calcium with d3 on the first and third weeks, and plain calcium on the 2nd and 4th weeks
    Fri = no supplements (once a month they get organic bee pollen)

    She is hit or miss on hornworms, sometimes she loves them other time she won't touch them. I get them from dubia.com every few months. I can order her some.

    I can give her some plain calcium and I already intend to feed her more often to help her pick her wright back up.
    Nature is the best teacher, learn by observing
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    In general, once a leopard gecko gets going laying clutches, they come about every 2 weeks and you can see the next set of ovulating eggs even as the previous set is being laid. However, there are some geckos that have their own schedule. Three months from ovulation to laying is a little odd, but I think it's been known to happen. It's also possible that she ovulated and re-absorbed her eggs several times during that period and it was only the latest observed ovulation that resulted in eggs.

    Aliza
    Thanks Elizabeth Freer, SpottedDragon thanked for this post

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpottedDragon View Post

    She is hit or miss on hornworms, sometimes she loves them other time she won't touch them
    Hi spotteddragon,

    Always try without the dust if there is refusal or hesitation especially with Reptivite. I’ve always suspected it’s not great tasting�� due to the gecko’s faces. 2 of the geckos would show great excitement followed by this yuk face/ slow down licking thing on some feedings. I may have also accidentally dust too heavily on some feedings.
    Last edited by Blush50; 07-26-2022 at 03:30 PM.

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