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    Default Calcium with and without D3


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    I have had a leopard gecko named El Draco for about 6 months now. I know you're supossed to feed them calcium and I do. At first I had bowl of calcium without D3 in his tank at all times and dusted his food periodically with calciam containg D3. However, later I went to a pet store and one of the workers there said that I could just leave a bowl of calcium containing D3 in his tank at all times and that he would be fine. I've been doing the latter for about 5 months now and El Draco seems fine and healthy. Do I need to switch back to the former, or is what I'm doing now fine? Rhanks for the help.

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    Honestly, I would not leave a dish containing calcium with D3 or pure calcium in the tank. There is another leo, on this forum, that has reverse MBD from too much D3. They usually only need weekly dustings, with properly gut-loaded insects, of calcium with D3 and bi-weekly dustings of a multivitamin without D3. If you don't gut-load the insects, twice weekly dusting of calcium and once a week with a multivitamin.

    Or to take out all that hassle, use an all in one like Repashy Calcium Plus. I use that once or twice a week with properly gut-loaded insects.
    "Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference." ~ Winston Churchill

    “I’m being extremely clever up here and there’s no one to stand around looking impressed! What’s the point in having you all?”-The 11th Doctor.
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    There are several ways to manage supplementation. There is a concern, as mentioned above, that a leopard gecko can become ill from too much calcium and/or D3 and if you do a forum search, I believe there are links to at least 1 article about it. I don't know that anyone knows for sure how much is too much. What I've found over the last 10+ years is that some of my young hatchlings do need calcium without D3 provided in the enclosure, as some of them have demonstrated early signs of MBD which cleared up as soon as I introduced the calcium. I only provide calcium with out D3 in the enclosure to my young hatchlings. I feed my adults 3 times a week and dust feeders with Repashy Calcium plus every other feeding. I may give some extra calcium next season to any of my breeding females that seem to have a poor recovery from laying (this happened to one of my females this past season and with hand feeding and some extra calcium, she has made a full recovery).

    Aliza
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    I don't think El Draco is overeating on his calcium. His feces has the bigger brown turd and the smaller white one. I haven't had to change the calcium bowl for about 2 months (its just a bottle top from a dear park water bottle) I don't think the reverse MBD is going to be a problem. He doesn't have any calcium deposits under his arms. So should I just put the calcium without D3 in there and dust with calcium with D3? Also what would happen if he 'overdosed' on the D3. Thanks for the help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Agon View Post
    I don't think El Draco is overeating on his calcium. His feces has the bigger brown turd and the smaller white one. I haven't had to change the calcium bowl for about 2 months (its just a bottle top from a dear park water bottle) I don't think the reverse MBD is going to be a problem. He doesn't have any calcium deposits under his arms. So should I just put the calcium without D3 in there and dust with calcium with D3? Also what would happen if he 'overdosed' on the D3. Thanks for the help.
    How old is your leo?

    Leos don't actually have endolymphatic sacs.

    Too much vitamin D3 causes "reverse MBD". Let's see if I can find the current GU thread with the ailing leo with reverse MBD.

    Click, then begin at post 81: my leo hasnt pooped in about a week and is lethargic...
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 12-04-2015 at 08:21 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
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    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
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    mbd1.jpg
    That's a little more severe MBD but that can happen from too much D3. Calcium is absorbed into the body by Vitamin D. Humans and other reptiles get the amount of Vitamin D to absorb calcium from the Sun or UVB. Since leopard geckos are mostly nocturnal, they do not benefit from UVB, that's why we have to give Calcium with D3. Too much Vitamin D will stop the calcium absorption in the body, which will lead to the development of MBD. Too much calcium can cause health problems to, like renal failure. Its hard to say that they know when enough is enough, they're licking machines and will lick everything in their tank regardless of what it is.
    "Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference." ~ Winston Churchill

    “I’m being extremely clever up here and there’s no one to stand around looking impressed! What’s the point in having you all?”-The 11th Doctor.

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    I'd say El Draco is about 7-8 months. He's lost his bands and now has spots.

    His bones are fine. I really doubt he has any type of MBD because he doesn't show any signs of broken bones or other bone-related problems. (He actually plays what I call "trampoline." He'll climb up onto one of his reptihammocks, half-jump half-fall off, then climb back up and repeat that for a while.)

    From what I understand about MBD (since I've only read reports and never dealt with it) the symptoms usually occur in a few weeks to a month. So should I just put a bowl of calcium without D3 in there then dust his mealies, crickets, or waxies with the D3 twice a week. Or is what I'm doing fine?

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    I would say, given his age, just to dust the insects twice a week with the calcium+D3. He's at the age where he doesn't really need an extra dish in there. If you give your insects a really good gut-loading food, you won't have to dust as often. I feed my insects adult bearded dragon pellets and some collard greens.
    "Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference." ~ Winston Churchill

    “I’m being extremely clever up here and there’s no one to stand around looking impressed! What’s the point in having you all?”-The 11th Doctor.

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    Ok thanks! I'll take his bowl out and do the dusting. And for dusting the insects, are crickets better to dust than mealies, or does it not matter. I read somewhere that said dusting the crickets was better than mealworms.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Agon View Post
    Ok thanks! I'll take his bowl out and do the dusting. And for dusting the insects, are crickets better to dust than mealies, or does it not matter. I read somewhere that said dusting the crickets was better than mealworms.
    What brands of D3 calcium (and multivitamins) are you using? They are all different.

    The other variable is what you feed the crickets and the mealworms.

    Crickets are a much better leo diet than mealworms. Mealworms can be fed to provide some variety. Dustings "stick" to the crickets better.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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