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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    My vet will not do a fecal unless she's seen the patient.
    LOL, sounds more like a regular "doctor" than a vet.
    Likes Elizabeth Freer liked this post

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by buppiboyo12 View Post
    These past couple of days he has been coming out of his hides and hanging out when I'm in the room, whereas when I was in my room he would be always hiding so I think that he is adjusting which is good.
    Huh. It has been my experience with Scooby, that the only time he trots happily out of his hide is when he's ready to eat. Next time, your gecko comes out roaming the tank, offer it food. This might be it's way of telling you, "I'm ready to eat. Feed me now." He might be letting you know, "Ahh, my food source is here to feed me. Where are my bugs?" LOL!

  3. #33
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    Well guys,

    It seems that Alan is slightly more encouraged to eat, but since that time he ate 8 crickets in one sitting, he hasn't eaten that many since. I've been trying to offer him food every 1-2 days, figuring his fast would've ended, but sometimes he refuses and sometimes he only eats a little.

    Tonight I offered him crickets, and he only took 4 of them. 2 dusted, 2 not dusted, because I was getting a feeling that he didn't like the reptivite for some reason.

    His tail looks fine. He actually comes out way more often than he used to and he seems to watch me as I do my homework, etc. He weighs 75g whereas before the fasting he weighed 71.

    Is it a slow process for Leos to get off of their fast?

    Thanks~
    -Brooke :)

    1 Leopard Gecko: Alan

    Click: Leo Care Sheet

    "Every animal deserves the best life it can possibly have." -me 2018

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by buppiboyo12 View Post
    Is it a slow process for Leos to get off of their fast?
    I think it's more that their appetite fluctuates from day to day. I'm sure there's a "he hasn't eaten in this many days...which is too long", but I'm not sure what the longest period is that you might have to worry. Maybe someone else around here might know. Good to hear your gecko is eating though. My Scooby is starting to slow his appetite down now, but he's crossing into 9 months old, so I would guess that any day now, his appetite is gonna switch to being fed every 2-3 days...which is normal for adult geckos. He's bordering that transition now.

  5. #35
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    So I'm wondering if I should be offering him food daily then? His appetite may be slowing as well. Alan is 1yr 6mo. old (18 mo.) but he just used to eat really well in his old ten gallon. Even after eating more crickets, he still has not pooped as far as I can see.

    I know he's definitely not starving, but I don't know if I should be offering him food daily or every 2-3 days regardless of whether he eats it or not.

    My biggest concern is that he doesn't eat and then he becomes too lethargic and then I have to force feed him or something. I'm not really sure if the nutrients they store in their tails contain energy as well.
    -Brooke :)

    1 Leopard Gecko: Alan

    Click: Leo Care Sheet

    "Every animal deserves the best life it can possibly have." -me 2018

  6. #36
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    If he takes food daily, I don't think it's gonna hurt. I've talked to folks who do feed there geckos daily, but I've never experienced that so far...well, except for my new juvenile, who is transitioning into an adult now. He's taken food every day thus far, but I'm not expecting it to last.

    How long has your gecko been in his new tank? I know even when I would rearrange the tank, my old gecko use to stress out and stay in his hide forever...usually a month before he'd go back to normal. When your gecko is hungry it'll eat. I could always tell with my last gecko when it wanted to eat. How? When I went into the room to feed him, he'd stick his head out of his hide. If he didn't want to eat, he'd stay hidden in the hide. Another thing that I noticed, he always had an appetite after he pooped, LOL. Every time.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by buppiboyo12 View Post
    Well guys,

    It seems that Alan is slightly more encouraged to eat, but since that time he ate 8 crickets in one sitting, he hasn't eaten that many since. I've been trying to offer him food every 1-2 days, figuring his fast would've ended, but sometimes he refuses and sometimes he only eats a little.

    Tonight I offered him crickets, and he only took 4 of them. 2 dusted, 2 not dusted, because I was getting a feeling that he didn't like the reptivite for some reason.

    His tail looks fine. He actually comes out way more often than he used to and he seems to watch me as I do my homework, etc. He weighs 75g whereas before the fasting he weighed 71.

    Is it a slow process for Leos to get off of their fast?

    Thanks~
    Quote Originally Posted by buppiboyo12 View Post
    So I'm wondering if I should be offering him food daily then? His appetite may be slowing as well. Alan is 1yr 6mo. old (18 mo.) but he just used to eat really well in his old ten gallon. Even after eating more crickets, he still has not pooped as far as I can see.

    I know he's definitely not starving, but I don't know if I should be offering him food daily or every 2-3 days regardless of whether he eats it or not.

    My biggest concern is that he doesn't eat and then he becomes too lethargic and then I have to force feed him or something. I'm not really sure if the nutrients they store in their tails contain energy as well.
    Don't offer Alan food daily! Alan's growth is slowing down because he's an adult. Leos max out in size @ 18 months old. He's at or approaching his adult weight.

    Young geckos eat more often because they are growing.

    Please recheck your warm end hide and ground temps. 88-92*F is what Alan needs.

    You're overthinking Alan and feeding. He's eating. Don't worry.

    Alan is definitely ready to be fed 3 times per week, just like Schedule 126 suggests. He's gaining weight -- 75 grams now. He really does not need to eat more frequently. Feed him a little more at those 3 feedings, if he seems hungry. If he overeats at one feeding, he'll not be hungry at the next feeding. It's extremely important for you to supplement exactly like Schedule 126 recommends, NOT ANY MORE! I've "been here, done this" for a very long time. Lightly dust all the crickets at those feedings. Don't worry if he does not eat them all.

    Alan's not going to eat when he's full. After a holiday meal are you still hungry? Let Alan's weekly weigh-in be your guide.

    Weekly Schedule 126 for Leopard Geckos 18 months old +

    Crickets or dubia >> Monday - lightly dusted with Zoo Med Repti Calcium with D3
    Crickets or dubia >> Thursday - lightly dusted with Zoo Med ReptiVite multivitamins without D3
    Mealworms >> Saturday - no dusting

    Future weeks:
    Continue on since all weeks are identical. . . . . .
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 02-10-2018 at 07:30 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  8. #38
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    Okay, thanks for the advice... I will follow Schedule 126 and keep an eye on him. I'll try not to overthink it

    Just out of curiosity, do leopard geckos keep growing then stop when they're at 18 months? My parents always tell me they think he's gotten bigger, but I never usually can tell
    -Brooke :)

    1 Leopard Gecko: Alan

    Click: Leo Care Sheet

    "Every animal deserves the best life it can possibly have." -me 2018

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by buppiboyo12 View Post
    Okay, thanks for the advice... I will follow Schedule 126 and keep an eye on him. I'll try not to overthink it

    Just out of curiosity, do leopard geckos keep growing then stop when they're at 18 months? My parents always tell me they think he's gotten bigger, but I never usually can tell
    You're welcome.

    Be very certain that Alan is eating most of his crickets on the day you lightly dust with Zoo Med's Repti Calcium with D3. That's critical!!!

    Leos basically stop growing at about 18 months old. Of course, if they are overfed they will get fat just like humans do.

    Let the scale be your guide.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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