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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marillion View Post
    Slate can work, and many use it. However I opted for textured ceramic tile due to slate being somewhat porous and the possibility of any bacteria harboring potential and also so that our gecko can grip on it easier than the smoother variety.
    Good call! I went with textured (fake) ceramic. When I say textured, I am using that loosely as its really smooth but has enough for him to grip and walk (he had NO issues getting around). The ceramic is only fake so I could cut it but feels the same and had the same texture. As soon as I moved him to it, he ate right away (still worms, didnt get to the pet store yet but shortly), this time, without the struggle of the carpet. I cut the tiles to perfectly fit in the tank, then arranged everything back to the way he knows it, and I am telling you, he perked right up. He definitely likes the material better than the carpet (I hated the carpet, I knew it was an issue but I wanted advice first).

    Crickets will be purchased today for him, but I need a cricket keeper or something to keep them in. No way he will eat 12, and no way I will leave them in there so thats my sticking point right now (and why I fed him the worms).
    Last edited by GROOVY1975`; 08-14-2019 at 01:10 PM.
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  2. #12
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  3. #13
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    As to where to keep the crickets. I use the Exo Terra Large Cricket keeper. Don't get the Lee's version. Many folks use bins and such but I found based on my research that the Exo Terra version is much more secure and I didn't want any escapees...I have never had any with my Exo Terra version! You can purchase it on Amazon or at your local pet store very likely. I used an industrial strength double sided tape to glue down one feeding tray on one side and the other on the other side. One feeding tray contains a dry gut load cricket feed (avoid flukers as it is pretty bad. Use the Zoo med brand instead or you can purchase bearded dragon feed pellets and grind them up with a coffee grinder.) Alternatively there are other much better choices for dry gutload if you are in the USA but since I am in Canada my options are a bit more limited.) Check out Elizabeth's database for excellent dry gutload suggestions.

    For the other tray I use Repashy Bug Burger which is an all in one food and water source but I also add some Flukers Cricket Quencher (calcium added) but the cricket quencher is also not without controversy. There are some articles about it not being digested fully inside the belly of the feeder insect and thus causing harm to geckos. I myself change them out quite frequently so that the cricket quencher is never fully dried out. But you may want to do your own research on that.

    I also make a point of not having more than 100 crickets in there. You may want to keep less to allow more space for them and thus have less die offs. I clean the keeper out every couple of days making sure the crickets are up inside the tubes before I remove them with my hand over the opening I place the tube against a wall with the opening closed up by the flat wall. I put the tubes all beside each other on the ground against the wall and place a chair over top so that no one will inadvertently knock them aside scattering some crickets...it's happened to us before! I will then vacuum out the cricket keeper, use a wet paper towel if necessary and clean out the wet container as needed and add fresh food, quencher in there and top up the dry if needed.

    When I tap the tubes to get the crickets out, it is into a very tiny little cup held inside a tall larger plastic yoghurt container that holds the particular powder I am dusting the crickets with. This allows the cricket poo to go into the tiny little container and not the calcium/vitamin powder as well as not going into his enclosure. I will then coax the cricket into the larger container making sure not to dump any of the cricket poo into the larger container. Once the cricket is in the larger container I slap the lid on, swirl around and then hold the large container on its side inside the cricket enclosure and use a longer pair of tongs to coax the cricket out into the enclosure. The reason I have this process is two fold, I can dump out the poo from the little container collected from the chutes after the cricket is in the gecko enclosure and it is a more secure way of dealing with the crickets so that none of the crickets get loose in my son's room. He would absolutely freak out if any of the crickets got loose in his room!

    Sorry for the long winded explanation. But I thought to give you as much info as possible to give you some ideas on what to do and how to use the cricket keeper. I do highly recommend it. But only the Exo Terra Large version.
    Click here for Elizabeth Freer's excellent Leopard Gecko care database.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marillion View Post
    As to where to keep the crickets. I use the Exo Terra Large Cricket keeper. Don't get the Lee's version. Many folks use bins and such but I found based on my research that the Exo Terra version is much more secure and I didn't want any escapees...I have never had any with my Exo Terra version! You can purchase it on Amazon or at your local pet store very likely. I used an industrial strength double sided tape to glue down one feeding tray on one side and the other on the other side. One feeding tray contains a dry gut load cricket feed (avoid flukers as it is pretty bad. Use the Zoo med brand instead or you can purchase bearded dragon feed pellets and grind them up with a coffee grinder.) Alternatively there are other much better choices for dry gutload if you are in the USA but since I am in Canada my options are a bit more limited.) Check out Elizabeth's database for excellent dry gutload suggestions.

    For the other tray I use Repashy Bug Burger which is an all in one food and water source but I also add some Flukers Cricket Quencher (calcium added) but the cricket quencher is also not without controversy. There are some articles about it not being digested fully inside the belly of the feeder insect and thus causing harm to geckos. I myself change them out quite frequently so that the cricket quencher is never fully dried out. But you may want to do your own research on that.

    I also make a point of not having more than 100 crickets in there. You may want to keep less to allow more space for them and thus have less die offs. I clean the keeper out every couple of days making sure the crickets are up inside the tubes before I remove them with my hand over the opening I place the tube against a wall with the opening closed up by the flat wall. I put the tubes all beside each other on the ground against the wall and place a chair over top so that no one will inadvertently knock them aside scattering some crickets...it's happened to us before! I will then vacuum out the cricket keeper, use a wet paper towel if necessary and clean out the wet container as needed and add fresh food, quencher in there and top up the dry if needed.

    When I tap the tubes to get the crickets out, it is into a very tiny little cup held inside a tall larger plastic yoghurt container that holds the particular powder I am dusting the crickets with. This allows the cricket poo to go into the tiny little container and not the calcium/vitamin powder as well as not going into his enclosure. I will then coax the cricket into the larger container making sure not to dump any of the cricket poo into the larger container. Once the cricket is in the larger container I slap the lid on, swirl around and then hold the large container on its side inside the cricket enclosure and use a longer pair of tongs to coax the cricket out into the enclosure. The reason I have this process is two fold, I can dump out the poo from the little container collected from the chutes after the cricket is in the gecko enclosure and it is a more secure way of dealing with the crickets so that none of the crickets get loose in my son's room. He would absolutely freak out if any of the crickets got loose in his room!

    Sorry for the long winded explanation. But I thought to give you as much info as possible to give you some ideas on what to do and how to use the cricket keeper. I do highly recommend it. But only the Exo Terra Large version.
    NO the MORE INFO the BETTER! This is AWESOME and VERY helpful! Thank you! Here is a picture of Marvin in his new flooring (notice the tongue, he went crazy for the worms) whereas normal he could care less. I think it has something to do with the inability to see them in the old carpeting but the new carpeting he LOVES!

    I figured we are all Gecko lovers here so you would like to see my little guy (the glass is mist, not dirty):

    Marvin_1.jpgMarvin_2.jpg
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  5. #15
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    Great pics! That is one cool looking hide and a cute looking gecko! Glad he likes the new flooring.
    Click here for Elizabeth Freer's excellent Leopard Gecko care database.
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marillion View Post
    Great pics! That is one cool looking hide and a cute looking gecko! Glad he likes the new flooring.
    Thanks, he is awesome! I have had tons of geckos, but this is my first adult, full grown leopard gecko. I have had tons of giant day geckos plus many other non-gecko lizards (I thought at the time the day geckos were the best/coolest geckos) until I was given Marvin. This guy rocks, he is so much fun and actually likes people, my other lizards never did (but I dont play with him overboard). I let him relax and enjoy the enclosure and only play with him when hes out and about (I try not to bother him to much).
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  7. #17
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    A warm welcome to Geckos Unlimited!

    Here's a link about nutrition.

    "A commercial gut loading food like Bug Burger or Superload (both by Repashy), Cricket Crack, Dinofuel, etc. is going to make your life easier AND provide a nutritious diet to your crickets at the same time. Avoid Fluker's gutloads, as they are super feeble in their formulas."

    "If you opt for making your own gutload at home, here is a list of great ingredients to use:
    Best: mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion flowers & leaves, collard greens, escarole lettuce, papaya, watercress, and alfalfa.
    Good: sweet potato, carrots, oranges, mango, butternut squash, kale, apples, beet greens, blackberries, bok choy, and green beans.
    Dry food: bee pollen, organic non-salted sunflower seeds, spirulina, dried seaweed, flax seed, and organic non-salted almonds.
    Avoid as much as possible: potatoes, cabbage, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, corn, grains, beans, oats, bread, cereal, meat, eggs, dog food, cat food, fish food, canned or dead insects, vertebrates."
    For link 148 click: Gutload Ingredients for Bugs & Worms......thanks to Olimpia -- August 2013
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
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  8. #18
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    Quick update, tossed the meal worms (well let the rest of the lice ones go free in the woods), went out and got a nice little cricket keeper, and some yummy fat crickets! He is in Heaven now!

    If I could ask a different type of question? What makes the leopard gecko different than all other geckos? Are they a different type of gecko or are they the same type of gecko but a different sub-species? I am more asking what makes the leopards so different from the others, and why is the tail so fat when my day geckos were not (dont get me wrong, I think its cute as can be but it is fat). Why don't the leopard geckos bask like other lizards (and geckos)? I am just trying to learn as much as possible for him so I can give him the best care (as I stated many times, this is my first leopard but have had numerous day geckos and other types of geckos)?

  9. #19
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    sorry double posted by accident, deleted double post

  10. #20
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    Well now...what makes the Leopard Gecko unique is something that you would best read up on. It's a lot of things! But I can tell you they don't bask as by nature they are "crepuscular."

    Their nature is to be most active at first light and right when it starts to get dark. They don't tend to worship the sun like a lot of other lizards.

    Their tail is fat because that is where they store fat deposits to be able to be used when they don't get access to food for a long time. However, that tail can be dropped if they get extremely stressed out as a defensive mechanism. Which is not good for the Gecko as then they lose all of their reserves. They can regrow their tail but it is never as nice as it was before.

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