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  1. #21
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    I think the thing you're getting at with your question can be answered by thinking about how different various types of geckos are fro each other based on biological classification. The biological classification system starts with the biggest divisions (i.e. "Kingdom" or plant vs. animal) and continues like a branching tree through Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Species.
    Leopard geckos are its own species. Their genus is Eublepharis which includes all other geckos with eyelids Your day geckos don't have eyelids, so they are in a different genus and they relate to the leopard gecko through the next level up, the "Family", which in this case is Gekkonidae (or "gecko"). Once a type of gecko diverges in its classification from another gecko at the Family level, the two gecko types are going to be quite different. In this case, as mentioned above, one type is awake mostly right before and after sunset/rise while the other is active during the day, and one type stores fat in its tail while the other type doesn't. Make sense?

    Aliza

  2. #22
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    Here's a cricket keeping link and a mealworm link.

    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marillion View Post
    Well now...what makes the Leopard Gecko unique is something that you would best read up on. It's a lot of things! But I can tell you they don't bask as by nature they are "crepuscular."

    Their nature is to be most active at first light and right when it starts to get dark. They don't tend to worship the sun like a lot of other lizards.

    Their tail is fat because that is where they store fat deposits to be able to be used when they don't get access to food for a long time. However, that tail can be dropped if they get extremely stressed out as a defensive mechanism. Which is not good for the Gecko as then they lose all of their reserves. They can regrow their tail but it is never as nice as it was before.
    Thanks, the crepuscular note helped. I will try to read up on the differences, this helped so I will see if I can find other bits of info on the differences. I kinda figured the tail was where it held its resources so thats good to know, he still has the original (and its huge) but pretty cool.

  4. #24
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    I know this is probably a REALLY dumb question, and I am sure my question answers itself, BUT, I only want the best for my little lady Gecko. Her tail is nice, plump, fat, and healthy with no underarm fat nor fat anywhere else on her. I believe she is eating well and she is happy and content, BUT (here's the dumb question), can I safely assume that because there are still a cricket or two in the cage a week after feeding, that she isn't hungry, and is just content? I ask because she is SO LAZY, and I mean LAZY LAZY, so lazy in fact that she will ignore the food UNLESS I drop it near her (like almost on top of her). I originally thought her eyesight was failing, but its not, she sees EVERYTHING and follows the food with her eyes, just ignores it unless its right near her (or never at all). Rarely do I ever see her actually hunt for the food, and basically she just eats them when they are in her immediate range. I mentioned this earlier in this same thread (above) but now its a few months later, and shes pretty much the same but seems to be ignoring them even more. I may be feeding her to much, but I dont know, I give her 2-3 (large) crickets every 3-5 days. I assume she is happy and healthy because her tail is fat, and she does eat the crickets eventually, but I dont like that she goes days (even a week) before eating. I guess this is all normal, but I would like other Leopard Gecko owners to chime in that its normal and she is fine, so I dont freak out. I do gut load her with vitamins, and her water is always kept fresh (along with the constant 88-90 degree heat during day and no light, and cooler at night) with her hiding rock for cool side (always available) so I think she has everything and is happy, but the not eating freaks me out.

    Let me know your thoughts..

  5. #25
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    She's fine. Many female leopard geckos aren't eating much right now because they're ovulating. Just keep offering. I feel that a healthy gecko should not have a problem with a few crickets remaining in the enclosure.

    Aliza

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by acpart View Post
    She's fine. Many female leopard geckos aren't eating much right now because they're ovulating. Just keep offering. I feel that a healthy gecko should not have a problem with a few crickets remaining in the enclosure.

    Aliza
    Thanks for the heads up, she does seem better and eating properly now, BUT she laid 4 eggs overnight. What do I do with her eggs, leave them (which they are left untouched so far), or remove them, or offer them to a local lizard farm? Whats best for my gecko? I asked the previous owner (who cared for her 3-5 years when she had her), but she never laid eggs with her, or the previous previous owner (who also had her 3-5 years). I got Marvin from my step-daughter (previous owner) about a year and half ago which puts her in the 7-10 years old range (but no one knows for sure). Since this is the first time Marvin has laid eggs (that anyone knows of), I don't know how to proceed but I guess I have her kept healthy and happy as this is the first egg laying but IDK what to do now.

    It is REALLY important to note (at least I think it is), there is NO MALE gecko near her or with her ever. She is a single female gecko that lives alone her entire life. As far as I know (at least 4 years) she has NEVER been NEAR a male gecko. Can female geckos reproduce without a male? I know some species can but I suspect these are infertile eggs (like a chicken egg we eat) but I do not know enough about this process to know the answer myself. I have had tons of geckos, of all types, but always males, never females, so this is my first experience with eggs and leopard geckos (or any geckos for that matter), again I always had males.
    Last edited by GROOVY1975`; 05-30-2020 at 06:55 AM.

  7. #27
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    There are a few species of gecko (gargoyles, crested geckos, leachianus geckos) that have been known to reproduce parthenogenetically on rare occasion. It has never, to the best of my knowledge, been found with leopard geckos. The eggs are nearly certainly infertile (I've had my leachie for 10 years, thinking it was a male, and about 5 years ago she laid some eggs but never since) so you can just go ahead and toss them. My crested geckos and gargoyle geckos are laying eggs regularly and though I check each time, none of them has been fertile.

    Aliza

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by acpart View Post
    There are a few species of gecko (gargoyles, crested geckos, leachianus geckos) that have been known to reproduce parthenogenetically on rare occasion. It has never, to the best of my knowledge, been found with leopard geckos. The eggs are nearly certainly infertile (I've had my leachie for 10 years, thinking it was a male, and about 5 years ago she laid some eggs but never since) so you can just go ahead and toss them. My crested geckos and gargoyle geckos are laying eggs regularly and though I check each time, none of them has been fertile.

    Aliza
    Thanks for the info, I cleaned and removed the eggs. I was just worried they may be fertile or worse, Marvin (my female gecko) would be upset that I removed them. I was more concerned with her being upset, but if it doesnt matter, and she doesnt care, then I wont worry about it in the future.

    FYI, I didnt name her, I took over care for her a little over a year ago, from my step-daughter, who she got from her cousin so Marvin is anywhere from 8-12 years old. I know the original girl had her for 4-5 years, then my step-daughter another 3-5 years, and now me over a year so who knows exactly how old she is, but this is her first known egg laying. I look at that as a good thing in that since the year I took over her sole care, she went from not eating and living in sand, to eating regularly (when not ovulating) and changed to slate substrate. I also fixed her heating conditions and made it more stable and routine (6AM-6PM lighting at 90-92 degrees on the "hot side"), with plenty of shade and cool spots for her to regulate the temp. I look at her laying the eggs this year as her health improving, both physical and mental. I could be wrong, and she just laid it this late in life due to her own growing schedules, but I like to think I have her in a happy and healthy spot.
    Last edited by GROOVY1975`; 06-02-2020 at 07:23 AM.

  9. #29
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    Glad Marvin is getting such good care. As far as names go, the leachie I mentioned in my post is one who I thought was male for years until "he" laid an egg. Her name is Igor! In the wild geckos lay their eggs, bury them and walk away. In captivity, sometimes they may lay eggs in the lay box and can be found still sitting there after they've laid. I don't think they're protecting their eggs, I think they just haven't gotten around to getting out of the box yet.

    Aliza

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