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  1. #31
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    I have a new possible issue, in the last 2 weeks, she hasn't eaten much. Sure, here and there a single worm, but both times, only 1 worm. This seems to be enough and she gets fed up with me trying to feed her more and retreats to her hideout (this happened twice in the past week and half, which is how long its been since she ate a large meal). I then leave her alone when she retreats to not annoy her and try again later on, but is this an issue? It seems to have started when the weather here in Northern NJ started to get colder but it could just be coincidence (she is at least 7-10 years old, maybe more, but not less, no one knows the 100% age but close enough). I am the 3rd owner so the timeline gets messed up from person to person. I keep her tank the same temp year round, and the only real change is that I lowered her daylight hours by 2 hours during the day for DST. Her tail is plump, healthy fat, she is active, and quick, so she isn't the least bit lethargic but definitely not eating like she did last month. She shed about 2 or 3 weeks ago so I assumed it was that, but 3 weeks later, she only eats a worm every few days, but she does see them, licks them, and refuses to eat them. I try to feed her daily when shes not eating (like this), so the food is always offered more than once (and I make damn sure she sees it and refuses to eat before I stop trying), and she sees them but refuses them so I don't push it, I am just checking this is normal and shes a picky eater (or just lazy). I know I started this thread around the same type of topic but now it seems worse to me, so IDK. I just want her happy and healthy and I see no signs she isn't, but I concern over the lack of eating.

    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by GROOVY1975`; 11-23-2020 at 01:10 PM. Reason: grammar

  2. #32
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    Hopefully you'll get some more opinions but I don't see anything too concerning here. Sometimes they can go for weeks not eating too much only to all of the sudden get their appetite back after a while. As long as she is energetic and healthy otherwise I wouldn't be too concerned about a lack of appetite for a while. Just wait a bit and offer food again, appropriate to the feeding schedule for an adult gecko.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marillion View Post
    Hopefully you'll get some more opinions but I don't see anything too concerning here. Sometimes they can go for weeks not eating too much only to all of the sudden get their appetite back after a while. As long as she is energetic and healthy otherwise I wouldn't be too concerned about a lack of appetite for a while. Just wait a bit and offer food again, appropriate to the feeding schedule for an adult gecko.
    Thanks for the reply, thats what I was hoping to hear and what I am doing now. I am just offering her wormies per the usual schedule (every other day), with additional attempts in between until she eats again normally. I have been offering her once at night fall, then once a few hours later. She is eating in the later times the single worm, then retreats but seems OK. She doesnt seem unhappy, unhealthy, or otherwise not perfect so I think shes cool, but I wanted to reach out and ask others as well. Her not eating is what I pay attention to as I know thats somewhat normal, but I also dont want to neglect her if she is hungry. She has always been a pip with certain things, like eating. She used to be so dang lazy that I thought she was dying at one point, but I later found out (through the thread) she is just finicky when she wants to eat.

  4. #34
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    Feeding every other day is far too often for an adult gecko. Usually twice a week is plenty. Please see Elizabeth's feeding schedule in my signature below.

  5. #35
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    This is pretty normal for this time of year. For reference, I'm attaching an article I wrote for Gecko Time about the yearly cycle of geckos. You'll see they often don't eat that much in the winter. As long as they are behaving normally (though they may be a little lazier in the winter) and aren't visibly losing a lot of weight, they're fine.
    https://geckotime.com/the-yearly-cycle-with-geckos/

    Aliza

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marillion View Post
    Feeding every other day is far too often for an adult gecko. Usually twice a week is plenty. Please see Elizabeth's feeding schedule in my signature below.
    Here's a good feeding & supplement schedule for adult leos:

    Weekly Schedule 126 for Leopard Geckos 18 months old +
    (withOUT UVB)
    Early stage metabolic bone disease (MBD) symptoms include uneven (lopsided) gait, walking on one or both "elbows", bowed limbs, belly dragging, and an underbite.
    The Reptile Supply Company based in Lodi, California stocks Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3.
    • Monday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's Repti Calcium with D3
    • Thursday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3
    • Saturday > > Optional: mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting

    PS:
    Be sure to actually measure "surface" temps below any ceramic heat emitter! Lay the entire probe on some solid surface like cork bark. Don't suspend the probe mid-air!
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 11-27-2020 at 03:39 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  7. #37
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    THANK YOU! I know every other day is not the right feeding schedule from this forum and this posting I made a year ago, but the problem is, I am the 3rd owner, and she has been trained to eat this way. I am only keeping to what she is used to eating (every other day for her entire life), so she has a happy and healthy life. I will note, she has barely eaten now in almost two weeks (2 worms in almost two weeks) but her tail is plumpy fat, she is active, fast, and alert, friendly, and playful, so she show absolutely no signs of distress, just no interest in food. She does see them, she does get excited to see them (at first), she does go after them (sort of), it does seem to grab her attention when they wiggle, then she gets closer and almost turns her nose up as to say "nah, not today" then walks away and goes onto other things. She has eaten only 2 worms in the last week but this is a fraction of what she normally eats in a two week period. I was just making sure its a normal pattern of eating behavior for the season. I cant remember if she did it like this last year at this time, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was the same thing last year, I just cant remember.

    I know I sound a little nutso with the forum postings, I am 45 years old, I have had every type of animal in history, and care for them so they enjoy life. I feel having an animal is as important as any living thing, so I try to do my best with their care. This tends to spill over in my paranoia of not doing it right out of fear of not giving them a happy life, good lifestyle, or otherwise normal life if they were in the wild, so I tend to hit the forums and seek out advice from my peers.

    I am going to let it go, keep offering her wormies every few days and let it go, but not worry.

    Thanks everyone!
    Thanks Elizabeth Freer thanked for this post

  8. #38
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    Most of my geckos aren't that hungry now that it's winter. Even though the heat is on in the house, there's less light. Just keep offering and see what she wants. Here's an article I wrote for Gecko Time about how things go at my house throughout the year; it may be helpful:
    https://geckotime.com/the-yearly-cycle-with-geckos/

    Aliza
    Thanks GROOVY1975` thanked for this post

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