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  1. #31
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    Piggybacking onto this! I see a lot of advice for bonding with babies and juveniles, but is there any advice for adults? I got my leo at 2 years old, so she has a lot of old routines to break and new ones to get used to. She does very well when I'm not in the room with her, but once I am, and freezes up for a bit and then very slowly retreats to a hide. If I put my hand in, she wants to be as far away as possible, and this doesn't seem to show any change. I've had her a little over a month now.

  2. #32
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    Gojira: I'd give her time. Two years is a lot of routine to change. If her cage is somewhere comfy you could just scoot a chair up near by and do something quiet in the evenings when she is more likely to be out- read, phone surf, draw - basically don't look at her or make too much noise and just be nearby. If she starts to act normal and go about her business, then try doing the same thing but while talking to her, even reading to her. It sounds silly but it has really helped me when I've been working with other animals to train.
    Once she no longer runs or hides when you are just nearby, then you can try and get her to see your hand as a good thing, offer some special treat in you palm. Let her come up and eat it then move off before you move it away. This is often one of the bigger hurtles to overcome so don't give up if it takes a lot of time.
    Once she is eating out of your hand and more comfy then you can start lifting your hand up while shes on it - just keeping her in the cage so if she bolts she can get to a hide quickly. She should get used to the hand moving and start looking forward to you coming over - food works wonders like that.

    (Granted most of the animals I've used this method on are a little higher on the intelligence list, mostly birds of prey and other predators - but I think with time any animal can be taught to trust. I did a similar method with my goldfish and it didn't take long for her to see hand in the water = food lol)
    Nature is the best teacher, learn by observing
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  3. #33
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    Yeah I rescued a 7 year old SICK gecko. 3 years later she is still nervous but is ok. Time!

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