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  1. #1
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    Smile What Does an Overweight LG Look Like?


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    I have a decent size order of new feeders that I am trying to feed off. With all this food, I was getting concerned about potentially over feeding my gecko. Can anyone share a photo (whether a personal photo or from Google) of an overweight leopard gecko and a picture of a leopard gecko of healthy weight? I would just like to know what I should look out for. Thanks for anyone that can help!
    0.1.0 Eublepharis macularius, Corwin
    0.1.0 Canis lupus familiaris (Doberman Pinscher), Moxie

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    overweight :
    2 Albino Leopard Geckos-(Tremper) Rex & Xena
    1 Red Eared Slider Turtle - Shredder!
    2 cats- Tonkinese - Hassani / Orange Tabby Sachi
    1 ball python - Fang
    1 Beta - Blueberry

  3. #3
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    I would also be interested in seeing pctures to compare an overweight animal with a healthy weight one, I have lately been thinking that leos in general are becoming a bit fat, mine are a bit thinner than most "show geckos" do, and sometimes I wonder what would be optimal, what do wild leos look like???
    Saskia!

    7.9.0 Eublepharis macularius - Leopard Geckos
    1.3.0 Hemitheconyx caudicinctus - African Fat Tailed Gecko
    2.1.0 Correlophus ciliatus - Crested Gecko


    ..."don't breed or buy while homeless die"...

  4. #4
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    Thanks XoVictoryXo! Now to see one of a healthy weight.
    0.1.0 Eublepharis macularius, Corwin
    0.1.0 Canis lupus familiaris (Doberman Pinscher), Moxie

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    I think "healthy weight" might be controversial according to each expert. LOL (hey what do you know- just like humans) I think its why it is such a broad range on the care sheet when it says 55g-85g. Also allow age and length of leo to determine proper weights.
    female tails are shaped differently from males who are just overall larger.

    Heres a comparison of male/female tail (my Xena on left, Rex on right)

    Some may argue the female may be a little underweight (This tail could be plumper to my comfort level, so i give her a few more treats then male)
    Some may argue that the male is a little overweight (he has a pretty slender body, but I personally think that is a rather large tail but Im comfortable with it- but dont want it larger- he is a monster eater)
    ( i am no expert - just an observer speculator)
    2 Albino Leopard Geckos-(Tremper) Rex & Xena
    1 Red Eared Slider Turtle - Shredder!
    2 cats- Tonkinese - Hassani / Orange Tabby Sachi
    1 ball python - Fang
    1 Beta - Blueberry

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    Quote Originally Posted by XoVictoryXo View Post
    overweight :
    LOOK AT THAT TAIL!!!

    Jesse
    0.0.1 Leopard Gecko
    1.0.0 Troublesome Black Lab

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    Ok, so should I focus on tail, the abdomen, or both? Ahh! Lol.
    0.1.0 Eublepharis macularius, Corwin
    0.1.0 Canis lupus familiaris (Doberman Pinscher), Moxie

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    Leopard geckos carry their fat stores in their tail. Typically that is a good indicator of health. It is very easy to tell if a gecko has been properly cared for by the thickness of their tail.

    From what I've read, and in my past experience, a healthy leopard gecko will have a tail that ranges in thickness of approximately the width of their neck to the width of their head.

    So anything outside of that range might be an indicator of a skinny gecko, or an overweight gecko.

    Now keep in mind this only works for adult geckos who haven't dropped their tail. A lot of times if the gecko has dropped their tail it will be thicker than their head...

    Edit: I should clarify, the thickness should be taken at the widest part of the tail, not the base.
    Last edited by Duster; 02-26-2013 at 04:22 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duster View Post
    a healthy leopard gecko will have a tail that ranges in thickness of approximately the width of their neck to the width of their head.
    I believe this could be considered a good indicator! I had never put it that way, but will for sure start doing so from now on...
    Saskia!

    7.9.0 Eublepharis macularius - Leopard Geckos
    1.3.0 Hemitheconyx caudicinctus - African Fat Tailed Gecko
    2.1.0 Correlophus ciliatus - Crested Gecko


    ..."don't breed or buy while homeless die"...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duster View Post
    From what I've read, and in my past experience, a healthy leopard gecko will have a tail that ranges in thickness of approximately the width of their neck to the width of their head.

    So anything outside of that range might be an indicator of a skinny gecko, or an overweight gecko.
    Thanks for that quick rule of thumb; easy enough to use that as a guideline!

    Oops, Saskia beat me to it! Haha.
    0.1.0 Eublepharis macularius, Corwin
    0.1.0 Canis lupus familiaris (Doberman Pinscher), Moxie
    Likes Saskia liked this post

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