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  1. #1
    btvs29 is offline Newbie
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    Default Lowering Humidity


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    I have a Leopard Gecko and during the day if I open the window and turn on the ceramic heat emitter I can keep the humidity between 40-50%. However, at night the humidity gets up to 65-80% and I can't lower it. It has been raining where I live lately and it is suppose to go on for a couple weeks even though when it's not raining the humidity bumps up during the night as well. At night my leo's tank is the temperature it should be so I can't turn on the heat because it would get too hot. Is there anything I can do because I am really worried my leo will get sick because of it.

  2. #2
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    First off temporary fluxuation in humidity levels are fine, but over the long run you want to mimic their natural environment as best as possible.

    Humidity needs to be measured within the enclosure, not taken from the weather report or even from the room where your gecko resides.

    If night time temperatures in your living area are not to your liking and you can afford an air conditioner I would recomend that you first go that route, an air conditioner will reduce the humidity levels in your home somewhat and allow for easier humidity and heating control (it is always easier to add heat and humidity than take it away).

    If the addition of an air conditioner alone does not reduce the humidity level within the enclosure purchase a dehumidifier for the room that your gecko is housed in, this will (if properly sized) do the trick if the room is properly sealed from the exterior high humidity levels.

    To sum it up, measure humidity within the enclosure, if they are high reduce the humidity in the room the enclosure is placed by air conditioning, dehumidifier, or both. Either air conditioners or dehumidifiers work best in a room that is shut off from the outside (closed doors and windows).

    Maurice Pudlo
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  3. #3
    btvs29 is offline Newbie
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    Thank you. The humidity level is taken from the inside of his enclosure and I do have an air conditioner. I guess I will use the AC until I can afford a dehumidifier. Our house gets cold in the winter time and my husband I are going to freeze with the AC so hopefully the humidity levels start to go down naturally.

  4. #4
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    Oppressive humidity sucks, I was stationed in Ft. Polk Louisiana for a number of years, 100% and 95F at 9am and rising, lord I hated that place when we were stuck in the field for weeks on end.

    Maybe someone else can come up with a better idea, I am not sure a fan blowing over the enclosure will work with humidity that high but you might give it a shot.

    Maurice Pudlo
    To learn and to teach

  5. #5
    btvs29 is offline Newbie
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    Ya the weather here sucks. In the summer it gets to the 100's and we have to have the AC full blast and in the winter it's freezing. The worst is around 6 am it gets to the high 30s low 40s outside and we have to turn on the heater and scrape ice off our car to go anywhere. Anyways, I might have to go with getting a fan to blow over the top or the AC as a last resort.

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