Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    21,494
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    81 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)

    Default


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Quote Originally Posted by muffin_song View Post
    Aaaaand I found that she had pooped in her corner when I got home today. Thanks for making your mom worry, Scooter!

    I may occasionally pop back here to ask questions as they come up - it sounds like it's easier to keep things on one thread, even if the topic is different. Thanks to everyone for all the advice and encouragement!
    You are most welcome, muffin_song. I think it's On Topic enough since it's mostly about Scooter.

    Hope you and Scooter thrive. Maybe you guys can stop by now and then?
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 10-16-2015 at 02:47 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Likes Zux liked this post

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    180
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    So Scooter's weight has held pretty steady, even with the reduced feeding (down to three insects 3 times a week). Lately she's been getting dubias, horn worms, or meal worms (since the meal worms are so small, I've been counting two as one). When I handle her I try to let her run around on the bed so she can get some activity.

    Should I be concerned that she's not losing weight, or is it enough that I'm monitoring it and giving her less food?

    Here's a recent pic. Off topic, but I love how the spot by her tail looks like a heart

    scooter 10-20-15.jpg
    Likes Elizabeth Freer liked this post

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    527
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    They don't lose weight fast unless there is a parasite issue. So, just keep monitoring it and you're doing fine! For an adult leo, 3 bugs three times a week is about right. Too much and they get fat and develop associated problems.

    Todd
    Thanks Elizabeth Freer, muffin_song thanked for this post

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Atoka TN
    Posts
    2,014
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Such a cute little chunky thing! I love the spot by her tail, it does look like a heart. Mealworms are actually quite high in fat content, I didn't realize it until I saw the breakdown on the container I have and said some foul words
    "Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference." ~ Winston Churchill

    “I’m being extremely clever up here and there’s no one to stand around looking impressed! What’s the point in having you all?”-The 11th Doctor.
    Thanks muffin_song thanked for this post

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    21,494
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    81 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by muffin_song View Post
    So Scooter's weight has held pretty steady, even with the reduced feeding (down to three insects 3 times a week). Lately she's been getting dubias, horn worms, or meal worms (since the meal worms are so small, I've been counting two as one). When I handle her I try to let her run around on the bed so she can get some activity.

    Should I be concerned that she's not losing weight, or is it enough that I'm monitoring it and giving her less food?

    Here's a recent pic. Off topic, but I love how the spot by her tail looks like a heart

    scooter 10-20-15.jpg
    What about reducing the bugs to 2 per feeding 3x per week and increasing her exercise?

    That's certainlly a very cool heart marking near Scooter's vent.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Thanks muffin_song thanked for this post

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    5,358
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    What about reducing the bugs to 2 per feeding 3x per week and increasing her exercise?

    That's certainlly a very cool heart marking near Scooter's vent.
    It may be a good idea to replace one feeding with crickets a week.

    C18:1 trans11 was found only in A. domesticus lipid extracts
    which makes this FA specific for this insect species.


    file:///C:/Users/Nancy/Downloads/Online-%20version%20extraction%20of%20insect%20lipids.pdf

    Was the urate in that picture sitting alone( no brown part)? Hornworms actually make them have more frequent bowel movement, so that's not the problem.
    Currently keeping:

    Eublepharis gecko 2.1.0~Hemitheconyx gecko 1.0.0~Gekko gecko 1.0.0~Pogana Vitticeps 1.0.0~Varanus exanthematicus 1.1.0~Varanus acanthurus 1.0.0~Blue Tongue Skink 1.0.0~Red-eared slider 1.0.0

    Reptiles I have rehabilitated, rehomed or kept.
    All above species plus:


    Phelsuma Grandis~Rhacodactylus ciliatus~Paroedura~Rhacodactylus auriculatus ~Hemidactylus frenatus~Iguana~Turtles ~Snakes and too many more to name!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    21,494
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    81 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cricket4u View Post
    It may be a good idea to replace one feeding with crickets a week.

    C18:1 trans11 was found only in A. domesticus lipid extracts
    which makes this FA specific for this insect species.


    file:///C:/Users/Nancy/Downloads/Online-%20version%20extraction%20of%20insect%20lipids.pdf

    Was the urate in that picture sitting alone( no brown part)? Hornworms actually make them have more frequent bowel movement, so that's not the problem.
    Cricket advice is welcome.

    Please clarify your comment that I've made blue.

    Your link did not post.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    180
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JessJohnson87 View Post
    Such a cute little chunky thing! I love the spot by her tail, it does look like a heart. Mealworms are actually quite high in fat content, I didn't realize it until I saw the breakdown on the container I have and said some foul words
    You know, I had always heard that, but somehow in my mind I still had this idea of, "Meal worms are so small!" I'll start counting individual mealworms as one of her insects.
    Likes Elizabeth Freer, JessJohnson87 liked this post

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    180
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cricket4u View Post
    It may be a good idea to replace one feeding with crickets a week.
    Maybe I should give crickets a try again. In the past she's never liked them, and they drive me crazy (frequently dying in the cage, chirping, smelly, and they always end up escaping into my bathroom!) But it might be worth a shot.


    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    What about reducing the bugs to 2 per feeding 3x per week and increasing her exercise?
    That may be worth a try - I worry about decreasing her food intake too quickly, though.

    As for the exercise, I've been picking her up and letting her run around my bed 2-3 times a week. Yesterday this nearly led to her escaping UNDER the bed Thankfully I was able to scoop her up before she got too far! It's a fun activity for me, although I'm trying to make sure she doesn't get too stressed.

    Who knows what I would do if I ever got a dog...I'm already enough of a helicopter parent with my 8-inch lizard!
    Likes Elizabeth Freer, JessJohnson87 liked this post

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    5,358
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    Cricket advice is welcome.

    Please clarify your comment that I've made blue.

    Your link did not post.
    The introduction explains it.

    Most of the attention on insects as a food source focuses on protein
    content. However, lipids are also a main component of insects and are
    produced during protein isolation (Yi et al., 2013). Lipids are a source
    of energy and of essential fatty acids (FA)
    , therefore they could be
    used to combat malnutrition in developing countries (Smit, Muskiet, &
    Boersma, 2004). In populations with inadequate total energy intake,
    such as seen in many developing regions, dietary fats are important
    macronutrients that contribute to increase energy intake to more
    appropriate levels
    (FAO, 2010). Insect lipids can contribute to human nutrition
    by supplying energy and essential fatty acids (Ramos-Elorduy,
    200. Generally, the lipid content of insects ranges from less than 10%
    to more than 30% on a fresh weight basis and are relatively high in
    the unsaturated C18 FA, including oleic acid (18:1 cis9), linoleic acid
    (18:2 cis9,12) and linolenic acid (18:3cis9,12,15) (DeFoliart, 1991).

    Remember how it was mentioned that dubia roaches where lacking some fatty acids? Basically one insect can offer what another cannot regardless of what it is fed, hence why as you know variety is important.

    Highlight the whole link, hit copy and just paste it in the browser, then enter. It should work.

    Biochemistry of Lipids: Fatty Acids, Omega Fats, Triglycerides, Phospholipids, Eicosanoids

    Enjoy
    Last edited by cricket4u; 10-22-2015 at 05:13 PM.
    Currently keeping:

    Eublepharis gecko 2.1.0~Hemitheconyx gecko 1.0.0~Gekko gecko 1.0.0~Pogana Vitticeps 1.0.0~Varanus exanthematicus 1.1.0~Varanus acanthurus 1.0.0~Blue Tongue Skink 1.0.0~Red-eared slider 1.0.0

    Reptiles I have rehabilitated, rehomed or kept.
    All above species plus:


    Phelsuma Grandis~Rhacodactylus ciliatus~Paroedura~Rhacodactylus auriculatus ~Hemidactylus frenatus~Iguana~Turtles ~Snakes and too many more to name!
    Thanks Elizabeth Freer thanked for this post

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

User Tag List

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •