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  1. #1
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    Default Freaking out because I'm a hypochondriac and love my gecko


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    Hello! I just got my leopard gecko about 3 days ago and she was kinda skinny (she was from petco) I have her in a 10 gallon tank with reptile carpet a U.T.H with a hide over it, a shallow water dish a small bottle cap with repti calcium with d3 and the worms I am feeding her are vita bugs super worms. I've read they are already gut loaded with key vitamins and nutrients so you wouldn't have to dust or gut load them your self, but I still over the calcium with d3 in a tiny cap she was about one super worm a day. And I was even sceptical about giving her prey this big but she eats them. I also have a humid hide with Eco earth in it on the cool side. I did tons of research before getting one and finally committed. Now my question is does she look healthy? Is one super worm a day good enough for her? She just went through a shed and her toe was bleeding but everything else was perfect. Her name is Goliath, even though she is tiny but I'm just concerned about her health and wondering the if you can confirm if she looks healthy. Thank you! I'm going to save up and take her to a exotic vet in a couple of days for a check up but I would also like some of your opinions on care as well, maybe even tell
    Me what morph she is would be helpful.
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  2. #2
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    Firstly welcome to GU! Glad you found us.
    Secondly, please read over Elizabeth's caresheet. It highlights everything your new gecko will need to thrive with you.
    Link:
    Leopard Gecko Caresheet (Eublepharis macularius)...demo video & 4 Jan 2013 update

    You'll want to stop feeding super worms. Your gecko is very young, I'm surprised your gecko can swallow them. They should not be fed over sized insects when they are little and feeders should not exceed the size of the space between their eyes.
    I would provide her with a warm humid hide as soon as possible, as well as assisting her with removing the shed on her toes. There's instructions on a "gecko sauna" in Elizabeth's caresheet as well.
    Again, it's the best one out there and is really well rounded. Often times, pet stores are misinformed about information and care.
    Kelly @ Tree Devil Geckos
    Producing awesome Leachianus geckos and Gargoyle geckos since 2017
    http://www.facebook.com/treedevilgeckos
    http://www.treedevilgeckos.com
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  3. #3
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    Hi, welcome to GU.

    I agree with everything Kelly already said above but i do want to emphasize this.., please don't feed the superworms untill the animal is full grown as the risk of impaction or other problems are to high, try to feed it as varied as possible with well gutloaded crickets, locusts, roaches, smaller worms, etc...
    Also take out the Calcium with D3 and be sure not to overuse it when supplementing.
    A well balanced diet is one of the key points in keeping a gecko (and most other living organisms) healthy, if you do it right you will prevent lot's of freaking out in the future.

    Elizabeth's wonderfull caresheet will provide you with everything you need to know.

    Good luck.
    E. macularius
    H. imbricatus
    C. pubisulcus
    C. ciliatus
    M. chahoua
    R. auriculatus
    B. cyclura
    S. ciliaris
    S. wellingtonae
    S. taenicauda
    S. spinigerus
    S. krisalys
    P. grandis
    P. abbotti chekei
    E. inunguis
    P. masobe
    p. picta
    U. henkeli
    U. lineatus
    U. sikorae
    U. sikorae
    Mt. d'Ambre
    U. phantasticus
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  4. #4
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    You also need a cool hide for your gecko. You can provide calcium in the tank, but only without d3. It's impossible for overdosage if it is pure calcium, as any excess will come out when your gecko defecates.
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  5. #5
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    Hi ~

    A warm welcome to Geckos Unlimited.

    Please move the humid hide to the warm end. Warmth from the UTH helps generate the necessary humidity for good shedding and for hydration.

    I do not recommend even leaving a dish of plain calcium inside the enclosure. There can be too much.

    Hilde writes:
    CALCIUM - excess
    "Excess calcium in the digestive tract can hinder absorption of Vitamin A and D (we won't worry about E & K here). MBD is often considered to be caused by a shortage of calcium, but can happen even though there is ample calcium available. If there's not enough Vit D available, either stored in the liver or absorbed via food/supplements, then there won't be enough calcium absorbed. If you suspect a calcium shortage, it's easy to increase the amount available by dusting more often, even to the point of 'icing' the bugs with calcium, all of which just puts more calcium into the intestines but allowing less and less Vitamin A & D to be absorbed.... a vicious circle. The result is a gecko with possible MBD (even if it's on calcium substrate and gets calcium supplement), and a severe shortage of Vitamin A & D.

    "And so it continues.... more calcium, less vitamin A & D".

    An ~86*F (30*C) soak or a humidity chamber (see post 4 on my Leo Guidelines) will help remove any stuck shed on the toes.

    Even though bugs or worms may have been fed, they soon poop it out! They need to be fed a healthy dry diet 24/7.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 03-11-2016 at 08:09 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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