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    Default My geckos belly looks bloated


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    Hello! Recently one of my three leopard geckos looks somehow bloated. Like, her belly looks a lot bigger than those of my other gecko's. I'm not sure if this might just be about genetics or if she might have any impaction issues. When touching her belly area it feels quite normal and soft. She lives on a loose earth-clay mixture i got off amazon (it's rather hard - so I assume there are no issues with the substrate) and I feed her in an extra box to prevent her from accidently getting substrate in her mouth. Her diet consist mainly of mealworms and crickets. She's about 10 months old but it looks like she is fully grown up now. I will attach a picture, too!
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    Last edited by Luisa; 02-26-2018 at 01:45 PM.

  2. #2
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    I can see what you mean in the second picture. The other two pictures don't really show it. Any chance that she's ovulating or has eggs (she could even with not male, though it's not common)? Is she pooping normally? Is there any trace of substrate in her poop (it will be easier to see if you can see it when it's fresh)? It could also just be a big-bellied gecko!

    Aliza

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    She's currently living with a male gecko, but he's a bit younger (8 months) and still looks quite small, so i assumed she couldn't get pregnant that young. I'm also planning to sell the male but we have super cold weather at the moment, so I'm waiting for warmer days. She never had eggs before, that's all I can say for sure.I can't really tell my geckos poop apart as they're all living together, but all of them look healthy and substrate free

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    She can become gravid that young and he can make her gravid. Check for eggs. Be prepared to provide a lay box if necessary. If she's pooping normally (you could consider separating her for a few days to see her poop) she's probably not impacted. You have to be sure that she's actually doing any pooping, though.

    Aliza
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    LOL, she looks like she likes to eat alot. I have a 10 month old male and his body shape looks just like yours. My Scooby loves to eat every night and his belly has grown bigger. He's also getting some little fat tufts behind his front legs. He's healthy though.

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    So, big update!
    She actually was pregnant, yesterday I saw her digging the whole night, and only today I found two eggs!
    Even thought I didn't want eggs in the first place, I'm kinda lookin forward to the babies... I don't really know a lot about breeding so I will try to ask anything important away!
    I'm not sure if I did everything right, so here's what I've done:
    She probably layed the eggs last night and I found them this evening. They were super deep in the earth, I would have never found them if my girl had not acted so suspiciously.
    So, yesterday I removed the male from her so he couldn't stress her out while she was preparing her "egg hole"
    When I found them I carefully removed them from the vivarium (and I tried to not turn them around) and put them inside a little cricket box, on moist eco earth. The box with the eggs now stands on a heat map! I don't have an incubator yet, can I still incubate them on females if they aren't inside an incubator right from the beginning? How long will it take for them to hatch? And even though she looks much thinner now, could she still be pregnant and should I keep checking for the eggs in the next few days? Also, after not eating for a while, she just ate some mealworms so might this be a sign that she's not pregnant anymore? And if there is anything important I forgot, please let me know asap!

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    Generally leopard geckos lay 1 or 2 egg clutches. Carefully press her body up against the glass. Do you see more eggs?

    Here are some tips for incubating her eggs.

    Click: Albey's How To Incubate Leopard Gecko Eggs
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside a vivarium <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    Leopard geckos store sperm and can lay 3 clutches or more every 2 weeks or so. There's no way to know how many clutches she will lay or if these first eggs will hatch or not. The eggs do best when incubated at a constant temperature. Some people have done well incubating them right in the cage or in a place in their house that stays at the right temperature, but it's a bit more risky in terms of success. If you incubate at about 80-82 it should take 7-8 weeks for the eggs to hatch in my experience. Higher temps will reduce incubation time to 4-6 weeks depending on the temperature.

    This is a word of advice to other potential breeders since your horse has already left the barn: if you have a male and a female together and hope to breed, it's a good idea to get the incubator set up before you put the geckos together.

    Aliza

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    Hello again! So, my eggs both started looking extremely dented and it looks very bad do you think there might be any hope for them to hatch? They still look fertile when I look through them with a light, there's little "veins" running through them and I think I can see a little body inside. What might have caused the dents? 20180311_183151.jpg

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    The medium they are in looks pretty dry. The humidity needs to be high. Take a damp paper towel and lay it over the eggs. Make sure the substrate is very moist, though not soaking and be sure to put a cover on the container. If the eggs are still viable they should plump back up. Sometimes there are veins, but they're not organized into anything that will be viable and it's way too soon to see any little body in there.

    Aliza

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