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    Default Help: Territorial brothers lashed at eachother last night


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    I have 2 male (1-2 year old) Leos and they got in a fight for the first time last night. I don't have a vet close enough to take him in today... but I need advice. I am essentially a new owner. It looks like the dominant brother bit and held the lesser by the bottom of the neck, and slashed with his claws until he eventually let go. As we were trying to figure out how the injury happened, the injured little guy got his tail grabbed and it took a while for him to get it loose again. The tail and neck bites are superficial. I am concerned about the slashes. I need advice, and I need it soon.

    Thanks

    IMG_7496.HEIC.jpg
    Last edited by adhilde; 12-11-2018 at 07:04 PM. Reason: misspelling

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    First - separate them ASAP. Males can never live together peacefully.

    Then set up a quarantine set up for the injured one. Do not use loose substrate - use paper towel, unprinted newspaper, or plain brown butchers paper. Anything that can be cleaned daily and not stick to the wounds. Set up his cage with the correct temps, hides, etc but make sure that he can't catch the torn skin on the edges of anything.

    To clean the wounds you can dab them with a *Weak* betadine solution (mix betadine and water until it is the color of weak tea), use a clean paper towel or other non-cotton gauze and dab the solution on the wounds gently. Don't soak him in it - if they drink the solution it can make their stomachs upset.

    Other than that make sure he stays well hydrated, soak him in clean water baths if you need to (shallow 85-86* water) for 10 min twice a day while supervised.

    Reptiles are incredibly hardy and can heal from a lot of injury, but he should see a vet sooner rather than later. They can give you topical reptile safe antibiotic ointment and make sure the laceration does not need stitches. Human Antibiotic Ointment is not the best for reptiles and some of it contains other medications that can be toxic so I would not recommend using it without first talking with a veterinarian.

    **Also make sure whatever vet you can get him to actually knows reptiles. Some will agree to see them but are not specialists and don't always offer correct advice.
    Nature is the best teacher, learn by observing
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    Thank you . I have them isolated from each other. I will keep my eyes on him as I apply treatments. What signs of problems am I going to be looking for? Are there behavioral or physiological signs of problems? I was told by a friend that if he stops eating or gets lethargic, it is a sign he is getting worse. But I am not sure how reliable some of what my friend says is true...

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    Decreased appetite, becoming lethargic, and not drinking can be symptoms of both pain and infection. Also if the area around the laceration starts to become really red with reddish-pink "streaks" spreading out away from the wound or if the edges of the wound become black, dried, and crusty - the wound could be getting worse. He *may* loose some skin around the edge, once the skin layer dies it may slough off, making the wound appear larger - the new healthy skin underneath will be light pink if this happens. DON'T PICK AT IT.

    He may be bruised and painful for a few days, so be extra careful when handling him. Also make sure your hands are clean when treating his wounds - you want him as sterile as possible.

    I would only treat the wounds with betadine once a day for 3 days, or until a veterinarian says otherwise. Betadine can also slow down healing if applied too much.
    Nature is the best teacher, learn by observing
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    Thanks again.

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    On home page under general discussion click gecko care sheet by Elizabeth . Theirs detailed information about how keep geckos.
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    I'm glad you've permanently separated these males. Males housed together can fight to the death of the submissive gecko.

    Do you see any internal organ damage in the belly gash?

    A vet can prescribe silvadene cream (silver sulfadiazine). It's better than a petroleum-based antibiotic ointment.

    To find a reptile vet near you click: https://arav.site-ym.com/search/custom.asp?id=3661
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 12-12-2018 at 07:19 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside a vivarium <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpottedDragon View Post
    . . . . . .

    Other than that make sure he stays well hydrated, soak him in clean water baths if you need to (shallow 85-86* water) for 10 min twice a day while supervised.

    . . . . . .
    Keep his skin clean and DRY after you've done the betadine treatment. That will promote fastest healing.

    Make certain he has fresh water daily and that his moist hide sits on top of the heat mat.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside a vivarium <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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