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  1. #41
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    Thanks, she's not really 75% of her former weight, that is holding well. She's 75% of her former 'normal' activity - if you recall, we overdosed her on D3 about 6 months ago. I think her weight is fine and her tail is still plump. Thanks again for all the advice and assistance!
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by gujn View Post
    So, as you can see, it's been a few months. Apricot is doing okay, but still not close to 100%, I'd say more about 75%.

    She won't eat on her own, so we have to force (I say this lightly) feed her. (Hold the mealworm against the side of her mouth, nudging a bit to get her to open and take the worm) She will eat anywhere from zero to eight depending on her mood. We do this every other day and she seems to be maintaining weight and tail, but has lost some weight from her original self. She is not extremely active, but when out for feeding, she does move around and walks fairly normal, but you can tell not quite right. She does poop fine and continues to go in to her cool hide to do so on the other side of the tank.

    We have her on a schedule of D3 every 10 days (dusted worms) and then straight calcium every 10 days, staggered by 5 days apart from the D3.

    We just want to get her to eat on her own again, but that isn't happening. She seems as if she has lost some of her brain function is the best way to put it.
    Quote Originally Posted by gujn View Post
    Understand that she will eat the mealworms if pushed to her mouth, but very reluctanly, and she definitely is not interested in pursuing, hunting, or eating on her own. Once she has had enough, she let's us know. Sometimes she's like "Nope, no food today" and closes her eyes and turns away trying to get away from us.

    She does not appear to be losing any significant weight, but I'm worried if we don't 'force' feed her, she will.
    You're welcome.

    Sometimes a leo can go months without eating and maintain his/her weight.

    I am curious. So Apricot is mobile and usually eating when you hand feed her. Since you've been hand feeding Apricot mealworms until she's full, have you ever gone a week or so without any food so she's hungry and motivated to eat on her own?

    I don't think she'll hunt for food until hunger sets in. Right now Apricot kinda knows her next meal is right around the corner.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 07-29-2020 at 08:55 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  3. #43
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    You're absolutely on target - after a few 'missed' feedings she's back to getting her own worms from the bowl! She's still a little wonky, and seems to miss striking compared to what she used to do, but all in all she's in a much better spot now.

    Do you know if the D3/Vitamin overdose 'damages' are permanent? It's been quite a few months since we removed and reintroduced appropriate quantities.
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  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by gujn View Post
    You're absolutely on target - after a few 'missed' feedings she's back to getting her own worms from the bowl! She's still a little wonky, and seems to miss striking compared to what she used to do, but all in all she's in a much better spot now.

    Do you know if the D3/Vitamin overdose 'damages' are permanent? It's been quite a few months since we removed and reintroduced appropriate quantities.


    I don't know whether D3/vitamin overdose 'damages' are permanent in leopard geckos. In humans vitamin D3 has a wide dosage-related safety margin.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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