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    Default Leopard gecko shedding


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    Hello!

    After months of researching and preparing suitable bioactive terrarium I finnaly got my leopard gecko. When I came to pick it up, it was obvious, he was going to shed soon. I've had it for few days now and he's completely pale (from his normal full-body orange colour) and I've only seen him use his moist hide once. His hide is made out of rocks and covered with soil so I dare not to just stick my hand in and move him to temporary enclosure. Maybe im just panicking, like I always see beginners do, but I just want to make sure he's going to be all right.

    Should I mist his warm hide so he gets the moisture he needs?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Hotpeon; 04-10-2020 at 05:28 PM.

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    Welcome aboard!

    • Is your humid hide on the warm end?
    • What type thermometer are you using to measure temps?
    • What's the temp inside the moist hide?

    Temperatures - A temperature gradient from warm to cool maintains your leo's health. Here's a temperature guide for all leopard geckos as measured with the probe of a digital thermometer or a temp gun (and controlled by a thermostat set at 91*F/32.8*C).

    Place the thermostat's probe and a digital thermometer's probe together right on top of the substrate underneath the warm dry hide. If you use a UTH + a CHE you'll need 2 separate thermostats, because ground and air temperatures are substantially different.

    • Warm dry hide ground temperature: 88-92 F (31.1-33.3 C) inside a leo's warm dry hide.
    • Warm humid/moist hide: Also place the humid hide 100% on top of the heat mat. Keep temperatures similar to the warm dry hide.
    • Cool dry hide ground temperature: 70ish-75 F (21.1-23.9 C) Usually the cool end ground temperature matches the room temperature where the enclosure sits.
    • no greater than 82ish F (27.8ish C) air temperature - 4 inches (10 cm) above ground on the warm end
    • no greater than 75 F (23.9 C) air temperature - 4 inches (10 cm) above ground on the cool end

    Leave the heat mat/UTH on 24/7. If you wish, during the night turn off overhead lighting/heating (~12 hours on and ~12 hours off) unless ambient room temperatures drop lower than 67ish*F (19.4*C).
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    The temperatures are spot on, as I prepared everything beforehand. Im using UTH and im considering getting a halogen light for UVA intake. I noticed he's already began shedding - he tore off all the skin from his head, leaving it torn in area around his neck, the rest of the body is still pale. The issue is, that he's still in his warm hide, so I just moisted it up to assist him with shedding. His moist hide is a corkbark log and it's located half on warm and half on cold side (both ends can fit him quite easily) and i've only noticed him in the cooler part. I've filled the log with sphagnum moss to stay moist. Hopefully I'll notice some progress in sheding next time I check on him, as I thought they take it off all in one piece. He's got exposed rock walls in his hide so I hope he can tear the skin off by rubbing aginst them. Agin, I may be panicking as I really wasn't prepared for him being stressed-out by the move and sheding at the same time.

    Edit:
    Can't really see the toes at the moment but I think it went well I am going to check on the toes later, but everything seems to be in order at the moment. I was just afraid as it was my first time and had no real idea of what to expect.
    Last edited by Hotpeon; 04-01-2020 at 11:31 AM. Reason: Update

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hotpeon View Post
    The temperatures are spot on, as I prepared everything beforehand. Im using UTH and im considering getting a halogen light for UVA intake. I noticed he's already began shedding - he tore off all the skin from his head, leaving it torn in area around his neck, the rest of the body is still pale. The issue is, that he's still in his warm hide, so I just moisted it up to assist him with shedding. His moist hide is a corkbark log and it's located half on warm and half on cold side (both ends can fit him quite easily) and i've only noticed him in the cooler part. I've filled the log with sphagnum moss to stay moist. Hopefully I'll notice some progress in sheding next time I check on him, as I thought they take it off all in one piece. He's got exposed rock walls in his hide so I hope he can tear the skin off by rubbing aginst them. Agin, I may be panicking as I really wasn't prepared for him being stressed-out by the move and sheding at the same time.

    Edit:
    Can't really see the toes at the moment but I think it went well I am going to check on the toes later, but everything seems to be in order at the moment. I was just afraid as it was my first time and had no real idea of what to expect.
    How did your leo's shed go? Sometimes leos do shed in large chunks. That may depend upon the humidity of his current hide.

    In the future a nearly closed off humid hide totally on the warm end with a small entrance and filled with sphagnum moss or Eco Earth's coco fiber will be helpful. A warm, moist hide is beneficial for staying hydrated and for shedding. Here's a really basic model.

    FYI: If you'd prefer photos being in the body of your message instead of in the "Attached Thumbnails" box, after you upload them first click "Insert Inline" and then click "Done".

    Edit:
    Why are you looking for a purely UVA source? If your leo's enclosure is large enough (90 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm) you may wish to add UVB. The best (and really only ones to use) are Arcadia and Zoo Med Reptisun compact fluorescents and fluorescent tubes.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 04-02-2020 at 02:07 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    It seems it went ok. I still have some trouble checking on all of his toes, because he still only hides and he's gotten really fast since shedding, but the ones I could see, were ok.

    Thanks for the advice on lighting, I've got quite a big enclosure so I will get Zoo Med Reptisun bulb, since I cannot get Arcadia in my country. I was looking for UVA source since there are lots of contradictory opinions and lightning all over the internet and in majority of them I saw, that leopard geckos don't really require UVB, since they don't expose themselves to the sun and I supplement D3. I also saw, that it is possible to keep them without either, but I really want to install it, since I saw that it makes them more active and happier.

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    Default Leopard gecko not eating for a week

    I've had my juvenile gecko for a week now. I'd consider him a rescue, since I got him from a pet shop, where he was kept on sand and under direct light. He's not eaten anything since I got him home, he doesn't seem afraid of me, when I offer him food or when I approach him he just licks the food or my hand and then does nothing. I saw him poop once after two days, right after he's shed, but nothing since. I also think, that he vomited out sand at the same time, so I don't think he's impacted. I know they can refuse food after rehouse, but I'm really worried since we got quite a strick quarantine and I can't take him out to proper reptile vet. I'd leave him be and try to get him to eat on his own, but i'd really appriciate an advice, as I think his tail is really 'thin' (not like stick tail, but it's not plump, as it should be), considering the previous circumstances. I tried feeding him crickets and mealworms (his previous diet), but he doesn't care about either. He also spends all the time in his warm enclosure (with proper temperature, the temperatures also seem to be in order in other places) and rarely comes out or bolts right back, if he sees me. Sorry for the long post, but I've already had a fright since he also just shed right when I got him, but thankfully that went without any problems.

    Edit: He just pooped and it's completely white, might be because he's only eaten shed skin in the last week since 1st poop was ok.
    Last edited by Hotpeon; 04-06-2020 at 11:02 AM.

  7. #7
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    The white "poop" is actually pee. will he let you hold him? If so, you can try to gently poke a mealworm or cricket at his mouth and maybe he'll bite it. It could be that he needs more time to get used to his environment (hopefully you've taken him off the sand). It could also be that he wasn't really in good shape at the pet store and he's just not going to thrive. Since a vet visit isn't an option now, I'd recommend continuing to offer, trying to hold him and feed him once a day and see what happens.

    Aliza

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    I know about the urate, but the other part was also whitish, my guess is because it was only from the skin he ate. I am trying to feed him crickets, mealworms or dubias each evening and even at night but he just nudges his head away after licking them. He doesn't let me hold him just yet, but i'm working on it. I called the store and they told me to get him on sand for him to start eating ... He really seems fine and apparently he had quite an appetite in the store. It might be also because he was used to feeding during the day in the store? I just really feel bad, it's day 9 now and I don't know what I can do. I still hope he's just getting accustomed to his enclosure but there's no way of knowing atm.

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    Exclamation Slit wound on base of leos tail

    I've only had my leopard gecko for 10 days now and he's not eating at all and to make matters worse, today I handled him and he was calm as usual and when he decided to get off (I hold him in my palm 2-3cm above the ground) he went to his hide. After being there for a while, I noticed, that he has a slit at the base of his tail and he was licking it. I can't even expalin how bad and sick I feel right now... The slit is not deep at all and it cannot be noticed from above or from sides. I cannot find a decent answer as to what follows, I am really afraid of him losing his fat reserves, as he's not eaten for such a long time and I probably stressed him out even more... Will the slit be able to regenerate and can he still draw reserves from his tail? I cannot imagine picking him up and moving him to quarantined enclosure in that state as I am worried he will drop the whole thing off... He spends most of his time in hides, in which I placed toilet paper. I've seen that I should keep the wound moist? I use bioactive substrate, so I will place toilet paper on whatever area I can cover as to prevent it getting into the wound. Should I be worried about tail dropping off eventually or have any other concerns? Is it a serious issue?

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    If it's a small wound it very may well heal. The real question, I think, is why he's not eating, though if you've had him for 10 days, there's still time for him to start. See if you can figure out how he may have hurt his tail. Is there anything sharp in the enclosure? Keep offering feeders. Maybe you can put down some ceramic tiles over some of the substrate until the wound closes.

    Aliza
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