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    Default Emaciated Gecko - Advice Needed


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    Hello all! I'm hoping that I can get some help here.

    I'm no greenhorn with leopard geckos; while I'm far from an expert, I know how to properly care for and breed them. I've been passively keeping them for a little over a decade, and have been breeding for a few years now. Because I've been keeping properly, I've never had to do anything resembling intensive care. As a result, I'm a bit at a loss of what to do.

    I sold this beautiful male (roughly) six months ago to an acquaintance who claimed to know what they were doing. She wanted him as a breeder, and having taken a look at her other two geckos, I thought she'd take good care of him. I was terribly wrong. This male went out in the picture of good health, and she finally reached out to me yesterday asking what was wrong. I was presented with a horribly emaciated gecko (see pictures).

    I, of course, immediately offered food (fattened dubia). Because of his weakened state, I gave him two small dubia, and he ate with no real issue. As of this morning, it looks like he regurgitated what I fed him and there is very loose stool in the enclosure. I'm sure he is dehydrated, so he is currently in a smaller enclosure with two easily accessible water dishes to ensure he's able to easily find water. As of today, he is wholly uninterested in food.

    The issue is that he's still active enough to refuse force feeding/watering. I've only had to do this a couple times in the past, and only on hatchlings. He's always been a skittish one, and the last thing I want is for him to drop a tail by forcing nutrition.

    I'm looking for any help at all. If you can give advice, feeding techniques, food recommendations, anything, I'd greatly appreciate it.

    20200624_083952.jpg

    20200624_083947.jpg

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    I, of course, immediately offered food (fattened dubia). Because of his weakened state, I gave him two small dubia, and he ate with no real issue. As of this morning, it looks like he regurgitated what I fed him and there is very loose stool in the enclosure. I'm sure he is dehydrated, so he is currently in a smaller enclosure with two easily accessible water dishes to ensure he's able to easily find water. As of today, he is wholly uninterested in food.

    The issue is that he's still active enough to refuse force feeding/watering. I've only had to do this a couple times in the past, and only on hatchlings. He's always been a skittish one, and the last thing I want is for him to drop a tail by forcing nutrition.

    I'm looking for any help at all. If you can give advice, feeding techniques, food recommendations, anything, I'd greatly appreciate it.
    Welcome to Geckos Unlimited!

    Rehydrate this leo for a couple days prior to feeding him again.
    • I recommend daily 15-30 minute soaks in 86*F water to rehydrate him. 86*F is a leo's preferred body temperature.
    • Make sure he has a warm humid hide 24/7 that sits on top of the heat mat.
    • See whether he'll lick Gerber's Turkey Baby Food (2nd foods) off his snout or your finger.

    Refrigerate a fresh stool sample prior to having it checked out for parasites.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 06-24-2020 at 02:17 PM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Thanks EulersK thanked for this post

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    I recommend daily 15-30 minute soaks in 86*F water to rehydrate him. 86*F is a leo's preferred body temperature.
    I've never made a bath like this before. Do I just full a tupperware container up to a point that he would hold his head above the water with his body submerged?

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    Quote Originally Posted by EulersK View Post
    I've never made a bath like this before. Do I just full a tupperware container up to a point that he would hold his head above the water with his body submerged?
    A tupperware container will be great.
    • Cut a hole in the lid, so he can stick his head out.
    • If you use a deeper container, make certain it has holes in the lid for ventilation.
    • Fill it with 86*F water to nearly cover his body.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    A tupperware container will be great.
    • Cut a hole in the lid, so he can stick his head out.
    • If you use a deeper container, make certain it has holes in the lid for ventilation.
    • Fill it with 86*F water to nearly cover his body.
    Got it. I'll start those cycles tonight. He's currently in a snake rack kept at ~85F, so hopefully his appetite reignites when he gets a bit hydrated again. I know many animals refuse to eat if they're dehydrated.

    Thanks for the help. I'll post if/when anything changes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EulersK View Post
    Got it. I'll start those cycles tonight. He's currently in a snake rack kept at ~85F, so hopefully his appetite reignites when he gets a bit hydrated again. I know many animals refuse to eat if they're dehydrated.

    Thanks for the help. I'll post if/when anything changes.
    You're welcome.

    Keep an eye on your leo during his soaks.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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