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  1. #1
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    Question New owner needing some advice


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    I've had a juvenile leopard gecko for about five weeks now. I've made sure that I have everything I need, and he even molted for the first time for me, and now I'm more worried about bonding. Once a week I take home out for cleaning, and I try to have a little interaction at least once a day. I've even put together a little box with bubble wrap and toilet paper rolls to play inevery now and then. I don't feel like he likes me a whole lot, but he is getting more comfortable. My mom suggested hand feeding him his crickets. May someone please give me some tips?

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    You say you have had him for 5 weeks, but how long have you left him alone? The most important and effective thing you can do to grow a bond between geckos is surprisingly to leave them alone when you first get them for a quarantine time. During this time, you do not touch them at all except to replace food and water, this gives them the chance to acclimate to their new surroundings so they don't feel threatened and they can become comfortable with hiding spots. If you have been touching this gecko from day one, he will probably be pretty stressed from all the touching since he never really got to "move in", another thing is that you should not be touching him everyday. You should start out slow, after quarantine maybe try to touch him a little one time a week, then next week try it twice, etc, so he can slowly and comfortably begin to get used to you.

    You also say you have a little box, when you say "interacting with him" does that mean you just take him out and put him in another box or is this his habitat? I would say a BIG no-no on that bubble wrap, if it pops it could scare him causing a huge amount of stress and could even make him drop his tail of its loud enough, and on top of that if there is shrapnel it could wrap around his feet and bind the toes or he could ingest it.

    Best not to start off with crickets, a popular food item for leos is mealworms, put them in a dish and they won't bounce everywhere and stress your gecko, not only that but it will give him the chance to get used to feeding himself. I highly suggest against hand feeding a gecko, especially a new gecko where impressions by an owner count here the most. If you continue to hand feed your gecko, it will learn that you will essentially baby it and that it doesn't need to eat on its own, and will not eat on its own unless you baby it again.

    Just take it slow, if you didn't give him a quarantine try to give it to him now, and don't rush things. This is going to be your bud for a long time, the begining is where first impressions matter
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    Hi ~

    A warm welcome to GU! It's best to let a new leo settle in first prior to holding him. That's the best way to foster a long term relationship with your pet.

    We'd love to make sure you are on the right track.

    How about sharing pictures of your leo and the vivarium?

    How are you doing for warm end, cool end temperatures?

    PS:
    Crickets are great insects to feed! They are less fatty than mealworms.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 12-27-2015 at 09:13 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    Thanks so much guys, this is very helpful! I'll be sure to follow your advice. There is normally around 3-5 degree difference between the warm and cool side.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panther-star View Post
    Thanks so much guys, this is very helpful! I'll be sure to follow your advice. There is normally around 3-5 degree difference between the warm and cool side.
    You're welcome.

    Is the temperature of the warm end ground 88-92ish*F as measured by the probe of a digital thermometer?
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    I was not able to find a probe, but near the top of the tank it is between 80-85.

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    Oh, and the time he gets alone is just about all day, except for the few minutes I would hold him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by panther-star View Post
    I was not able to find a probe, but near the top of the tank it is between 80-85.
    Quote Originally Posted by panther-star View Post
    Oh, and the time he gets alone is just about all day, except for the few minutes I would hold him.
    I understand that your leo has mostly alone time. When taming, little by little (baby steps) is the way to go.

    What type thermometer do you use? Analogs (circle thermometers) aren't very accurate.

    You may or may not have the correct ground temperatures. It is super important to get 88-92ish F on the ground under the warm dry hide, because leopard geckos depend upon correct belly temps to digest their bugs and worms.

    For about $10, you can buy one at Petco and Petsmart. Click: Aquarium Thermometers : Amazon.com: Zoo Med Digital Terrarium Thermometer

    • How old is he?
    • What substrate have you?
    • What size vivarium?
    • Has he an under tank heat mat?
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 12-27-2015 at 11:53 PM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    Oh, thanks! I have a Nat Geo Wild thermometer/hydrometer on the cold side, and I have a round zilla one on the warm side that came with the tank. I read your guide, and if only I had seen it sooner. I really feel like 10 gallon tanks are tiny, especially with the huge hide petsmart sells. I'll have to try and get a booger one soon. I was thinking of getting one with a slide door, so I don't spoil my gecko when I go to hold him. Oh, and interaction was the wrong word. I read that geckos are curious, so I wanted something for him to explore, but I think just getting a small lizard leash would be best for him since he likes to run around.
    Thanks Elizabeth Freer thanked for this post

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    I don't recommend the lizard leashes for leopard geckos. I used a guinea pig harness for my Savannah monitor years ago to take him outside and he almost strangled himself in the leash, never used it again. Just let him crawl around on the bed or couch without one and monitor him to make sure he doesn't go off the edge and onto the floor.

    Keep checking out the big box stores for $1 per gallon sales, they usually do them twice a year. Or craigslist is a good place to find a decent set-up.
    "Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference." ~ Winston Churchill

    “I’m being extremely clever up here and there’s no one to stand around looking impressed! What’s the point in having you all?”-The 11th Doctor.

    1.0.0- Leopard Gecko (Ziggy)
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    Thanks panther-star, Elizabeth Freer thanked for this post

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