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  1. #11
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    I've ordered the Ultratherm but I am still waiting for it to arrive. Than you for the suggestion, and the information about supplements.

    If I can keep adding to this conversation, I wanted to get your input on something else. While I am still getting everything set up, I saw a baby albino leopard gecko in a local pet store. I feel so bad for the little guy because he only has one hide, a bright light for heat, crickets running free in the cage .. clearly, not an ideal situation. So my question is, do you think I'd be okay rescuing this little one, seeing as it would be my first reptile? I really feel for him, but I'm worried he might be a challenge if he's been in a bad situation for a while. Thanks for any input.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vox View Post
    I've ordered the Ultratherm but I am still waiting for it to arrive. Than you for the suggestion, and the information about supplements.

    If I can keep adding to this conversation, I wanted to get your input on something else. While I am still getting everything set up, I saw a baby albino leopard gecko in a local pet store. I feel so bad for the little guy because he only has one hide, a bright light for heat, crickets running free in the cage .. clearly, not an ideal situation. So my question is, do you think I'd be okay rescuing this little one, seeing as it would be my first reptile? I really feel for him, but I'm worried he might be a challenge if he's been in a bad situation for a while. Thanks for any input.
    You're welcome.

    Please snap a picture of the albino leo so we can sorta judge his condition. As tempting as it may be, we can't save them all. If you know the clerks/manager, you might tactfully suggest better care for that albino. Tread carefully.

    I recommend keeping a healthy leo as your first reptile.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 02-28-2019 at 01:11 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  3. #13
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    My first and only gecko was also in a small cage with pretty much the same things except there were not crickets. He is now 8 1/2 inches and still growing. unfortunatly most petstores put them in small terrarium so that people can see them better. Look for bright eyes and clear sinuses. Ask to hold him/her, you want to see an active aware gecko, not one thats hardly moving or has trouble moving. Last, look for hard firm bones. If they feel spongy then it could mean it has calcium deficiency. which could lead to MBD ( metabolic bone disease ) . As Elizabeth said a pic would help.
    Likes Elizabeth Freer liked this post

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    You're welcome.

    Please snap a picture of the albino leo so we can sorta judge his condition. As tempting as it may be, we can't save them all. If you know the clerks/manager, you might tactfully suggest better care for that albino. Tread carefully.

    I recommend keeping a healthy leo as your first reptile.
    IMG-20190228-185550.jpg

    I'm not sure if the image worked or not, and it's a bit of a poor quality photo. As you can see, one of the geckos lost part of its tail, and it seemed to be a somewhat fresh wound. The employees didn't know the age of the geckos, but said they've had them for three weeks, and their "supplier" works with several different breeders. They said that the geckos are eating well. They did seem somewhat active; when the worker removed their hide, they seemed like they were expecting a meal, so at least they have that going for them. When the worker put back the hide, one of them nipped at the other, maybe trying to compete for the hiding space? Their eyes seemed fairly alert and they seem to have most of their toes, if not all.

    Edited to add that they are maybe three inches long or so, maybe less, it's hard to say. And the employee said they've grown already since they've had them.
    Last edited by Vox; 02-28-2019 at 11:44 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geecko123 View Post
    My first and only gecko was also in a small cage with pretty much the same things except there were not crickets. He is now 8 1/2 inches and still growing. unfortunatly most petstores put them in small terrarium so that people can see them better. Look for bright eyes and clear sinuses. Ask to hold him/her, you want to see an active aware gecko, not one thats hardly moving or has trouble moving. Last, look for hard firm bones. If they feel spongy then it could mean it has calcium deficiency. which could lead to MBD ( metabolic bone disease ) . As Elizabeth said a pic would help.
    I posted a picture of the geckos; funnily enough I didn't even know there was a second one in the tank the other day because it was hiding. I will have to go back to the shop at some point and try holding them, that's a good idea. I'm glad to hear your gecko is doing so well! It does make me sad seeing them in poor conditions, but it's also heartening to know how resilient they are. Hopefully with yours and Elizabeth's help I can decide if I should rescue one of them or order from a reputable online breeder. Thanks for the input!
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vox View Post
    IMG-20190228-185550.jpg

    I'm not sure if the image worked or not, and it's a bit of a poor quality photo. As you can see, one of the geckos lost part of its tail, and it seemed to be a somewhat fresh wound. The employees didn't know the age of the geckos, but said they've had them for three weeks, and their "supplier" works with several different breeders. They said that the geckos are eating well. They did seem somewhat active; when the worker removed their hide, they seemed like they were expecting a meal, so at least they have that going for them. When the worker put back the hide, one of them nipped at the other, maybe trying to compete for the hiding space? Their eyes seemed fairly alert and they seem to have most of their toes, if not all.

    Edited to add that they are maybe three inches long or so, maybe less, it's hard to say. And the employee said they've grown already since they've had them.
    I see 2 leos! One is missing part of it's tail.

    As you mention they could be competing for their hide. : If they both are males they'll know their sex before we do. Even if both are females, there could be aggression between them.

    Have you done any research on caring for albinos? They are sensitive to bright lights.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 03-01-2019 at 03:27 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    I see 2 leos! One is missing part of it's tail.

    As you mention they could be competing for their hide. : If they both are males they'll know their sex before we do. Even if both are females, there could be aggression between them.

    Have you done any research on caring for albinos? They are sensitive to bright lights.
    I have read some information on caring for albinos. I have heard that they don't like bright lights and coming out to eat during the day because of their sensitivity. I do leave my blinds open during the day to have a natural photoperiod for my hamster and arachnids, since they are also nocturnal/crepuscular and need that noticeable demarcation between night and day.

    I am thinking maybe I got a bit too anxious and overly excited about saving that baby albino. Perhaps a more bold and older non-albino specimen from Geckoboa would be a better choice. There's a lot to consider, and I don't want to be too hasty. Though I am eager to start caring for one of these adorable little guys and gals.
    Likes Elizabeth Freer liked this post

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vox View Post
    I have read some information on caring for albinos. I have heard that they don't like bright lights and coming out to eat during the day because of their sensitivity. I do leave my blinds open during the day to have a natural photoperiod for my hamster and arachnids, since they are also nocturnal/crepuscular and need that noticeable demarcation between night and day.

    I am thinking maybe I got a bit too anxious and overly excited about saving that baby albino. Perhaps a more bold and older non-albino specimen from Geckoboa would be a better choice. There's a lot to consider, and I don't want to be too hasty. Though I am eager to start caring for one of these adorable little guys and gals.
    I agree that a bolder, non-albino, leo will be a better choice. Well-kept leos can reach their 20s. There's even a retired breeder female in Europe who's now in her mid-30s!

    There are many details at first. Once your leo is happy, you'll be good to go. Get the largest enclosure you can afford right from the geck-go. A minimum 20 long: 30 x 12 x 12 inches tall with an 11 x 17 inch Ultratherm heat mat is what I recommend. Have it all set up with good heating. Then bring your leo home.

    Reptile shows are good places to see potential leos and speak directly with the breeders.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 03-11-2019 at 05:34 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Thanks Vox thanked for this post
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vox View Post
    I have read some information on caring for albinos. I have heard that they don't like bright lights and coming out to eat during the day because of their sensitivity. I do leave my blinds open during the day to have a natural photoperiod for my hamster and arachnids, since they are also nocturnal/crepuscular and need that noticeable demarcation between night and day.

    I am thinking maybe I got a bit too anxious and overly excited about saving that baby albino. Perhaps a more bold and older non-albino specimen from Geckoboa would be a better choice. There's a lot to consider, and I don't want to be too hasty. Though I am eager to start caring for one of these adorable little guys and gals.
    geckoboa has some SWEET geckos lemme tell ya.. oh and theres a pet only/adoption page too, not very many and some have defects but they are still gorgeous and deserve a good home. oh and very affordable!
    Geopard Leckos Leopard Geckos, say that 10 times fast!
    Likes Vox liked this post

  10. #20
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    The cool side in my leopard geckos enclosure is around 74 degrees. The warm side is around 87ish. Its important for your gecko to be able to alternate between a cool and warm side so that they can maintain a healthy body temperature. If your gecko tends to stay on the cooler side, then the warmer side may be to warm. Vice-versa.

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