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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Digs View Post
    Iíve heard that the moon produces uvb but not as much as the sun though. Maybe thatís how nocturnal/ crepuscular reptiles get some of their d3 in the wild.

    The moon doesn't produce any light, which means it can only reflect the sunlight that hits it. It doesn't produce any UVA, UVB or UVC. Some of the UVB that hits the moon can be reflected back to Earth, but it's such a small amount, it's not even worth considering.

  2. #12
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    Hi all,

    I just returned from the vet. Supplement-wise, she is 100% healthy - no swelling in any joints, excellent skin, very good weight, her hearing is great etc. She approved of my supplementation and said they can also absorb some UVB in shaded areas and that everything is a-okay in that regard.

    However, the vet noticed that her pupils do not react as they should when exposed to light. She also seems to not react very well to visual stimulation. Combined with the fact that she is a terrible terrible hunter, which she was ever since I've had her, and sometimes has the tendency to do some dumb climbing decisions, it points to her being visually impaired.

    Apparently leopard geckos can shake when walking very deliberately, which she often does: the vet tested it out by putting her in a faunarium with obstacles, and she seems to maneuver by primarily feeling her surroundings with her front legs and tongue. Her legs might shake a bit while feeling everything out. As long as she isn't shaking or having muscles spams while standing everything is fine.

    There's nothing really to be done, she said that I should just continue with my current care. It is not a major impairment, but I should avoid rearranging her viv too often and I will always have to bowl feed or hand feed her. She's luckily used to both and I don't mind doing it.

    I'm kinda sad for her but she is a very curious, happy and, apart from her eyes, healthy gecko.
    Last edited by humanabfall; 05-13-2020 at 07:23 AM.

  3. #13
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    Glad everything was fine at the vet. I have two leos and as far as using their UVB bulbs - It seems rare to catch them at it. My male changes hides every few hours during the day, so I know that he it exposed to some, but I only catch him with a tail out or basking maybe twice a month. My female is less active during the day but occasionally leaves her tail sticking out.
    I don't rely 100% on the light and give them D3 on their insects twice a month just to be sure.
    Nature is the best teacher, learn by observing

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