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    Default What type of morphs are they all (4 different geckos in total)


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    Hi, so does anyone know what type of morphs them are? Looking into pairing one of them with my female (you might be able to tell which is the female by the belly on her 😅 Another thing is do you think she looks gravid, I got told when I brought her that see me get be but it has been 3 weeks already, honestly I think it's just that she has a belly

    image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg
    3.1 leopard geckos
    1.1.2 crested geckos
    0.0.1 corn snake
    0.0.1 taranural

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    Was told that the first one was a hype with temp, I forgot the other type that it was meant to be, the white coloured one is meant to be a mock snow, the other one we don't know about and the last one is meant to be a sun bell
    3.1 leopard geckos
    1.1.2 crested geckos
    0.0.1 corn snake
    0.0.1 taranural

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    Im no exper but my guess would be.

    Super hypo
    Mack snow
    Common
    Bell Albino
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    It's much easier to tell if the photo is of the whole gecko from above. There are 6 pictures. I'm assuming that there is 1 picture of each of the first two and then 2 pictures of each of the last 2.
    The first gecko appears to be an albino of some sort
    The second is a Mack (not mock) snow
    The third can be called a "high yellow"
    The fourth is an albino. I have never heard of "bell sun". There are "sunglows" but those are usually Tremper albinos that have no body spots.

    Here are 2 things to consider about breeding these geckos. One is a practical thought and one is more of a philosophical one:
    I'm under the impression that you don't know for sure exactly what these geckos are and certainly don't know if they have other genes that don't show up visibly. In particular, the first one appears to be an albino and I suspect you don't know whether it's a Bell albino or a Tremper. While the offspring of these geckos have as good a chance as any other to be healthy, when you breed geckos of unknown genetics, you produce geckos of even more unknown genetics. Here are the thoughts:
    practical: some people who are looking for a nice pet may buy the offspring because they don't really care what their genetic heritage is. Reputable breeders will not buy these geckos because they don't know their genetic heritage.
    Philosophical: some of the people who buy your geckos will decide to breed them, producing even more genetically muddled geckos. The market gets flooded with geckos that will continue to blur the genetic lines. They will be sold cheaply because no one will want to pay much for them. This will also drive down the price of the geckos of known genetic heritage and all breeders will have a harder time making ends meet.

    Based on the above, I do recommend that if you want to breed, you use geckos whose genetic heritage you know (maybe you know the genetics of these guys and I'm just not aware of it). In addition, if you don't know anything about leopard gecko genetics (for example if dominant, recessive and co-dominant don't mean much to you) I do recommend that you do some research to educate yourself before breeding.

    Aliza
    Likes Hilde, Newbreeder liked this post

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    Quote Originally Posted by acpart View Post
    It's much easier to tell if the photo is of the whole gecko from above. There are 6 pictures. I'm assuming that there is 1 picture of each of the first two and then 2 pictures of each of the last 2.
    The first gecko appears to be an albino of some sort
    The second is a Mack (not mock) snow
    The third can be called a "high yellow"
    The fourth is an albino. I have never heard of "bell sun". There are "sunglows" but those are usually Tremper albinos that have no body spots.

    Here are 2 things to consider about breeding these geckos. One is a practical thought and one is more of a philosophical one:
    I'm under the impression that you don't know for sure exactly what these geckos are and certainly don't know if they have other genes that don't show up visibly. In particular, the first one appears to be an albino and I suspect you don't know whether it's a Bell albino or a Tremper. While the offspring of these geckos have as good a chance as any other to be healthy, when you breed geckos of unknown genetics, you produce geckos of even more unknown genetics. Here are the thoughts:
    practical: some people who are looking for a nice pet may buy the offspring because they don't really care what their genetic heritage is. Reputable breeders will not buy these geckos because they don't know their genetic heritage.
    Philosophical: some of the people who buy your geckos will decide to breed them, producing even more genetically muddled geckos. The market gets flooded with geckos that will continue to blur the genetic lines. They will be sold cheaply because no one will want to pay much for them. This will also drive down the price of the geckos of known genetic heritage and all breeders will have a harder time making ends meet.

    Based on the above, I do recommend that if you want to breed, you use geckos whose genetic heritage you know (maybe you know the genetics of these guys and I'm just not aware of it). In addition, if you don't know anything about leopard gecko genetics (for example if dominant, recessive and co-dominant don't mean much to you) I do recommend that you do some research to educate yourself before breeding.

    Aliza
    I actually know quite abit about breeding animals, I have done it before hand, I just wanted to make sure of the morphs that I have been told that they are, as I thought something was off when they told me, so I just wanted to comfirm that them morphs that I was told was actually wrong, I wasn't bothered at the time when I brought the other two, that I mainly didn't know about, (the first one and the last one) as I wasn't interested in breeding at that time, I am actually looking into breeding the high yellow with the Mack snow. I do know quite abit about the type of animal and the behaviour, I have already looked into the dominant and co dominant as well as the recessive genetics, But I can comfirm that I only knew them two and what type of moprhs they was image.jpgimage.jpg
    Last edited by 1Lauren; 05-22-2019 at 09:39 AM.
    3.1 leopard geckos
    1.1.2 crested geckos
    0.0.1 corn snake
    0.0.1 taranural

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    Sounds good, that's why I asked. Yes, those two are Mack snow and high yellow.

    Aliza

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