Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Coco fiber/peat moss as substrate?


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Thinking of making a more naturalistic tank for my leo, now that she's round 4 years old I was told she shouldn't be living on paper towels any more.... Few questions though- I have a ton of peat moss, would this be a safe substrate for the tank? And can you still use a heat pad if you make it deep enough to dig in, or should i slope the tank so the cool side is for digging and higher up and the warm side is a shallow layer?
    Is coco fiber safe for leos? I've heard it can cause respiratory issues...
    I also have plenty of dried sphagnum for my plants, used it for my corn snake too mixed with wood shavings and she loves it... but it looks ugly by itself and also doesn't make an even layer like soils do....
    Haven't heard much about peat moss however. Can this cause respiratory issues? If so, is this still a concern if you rinse it (done this plenty to make soil for my carnivorous plants)? Should you rinse peat moss? Can you mix it with coco fiber to make substrate?

    Thanks,
    Steph.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Somerville, MA
    Posts
    7,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    76 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I don't know much about peat moss. I have used coco fiber before and it's been fine. I had leos on coco fiber for about 5 years with no problem. Even though their habitat is dry, I would spray the coco fiber every few weeks --it does rain sometimes in their location of origin. the biggest problem is with superworms/mealworms that burrow into the substrate.

    Aliza
    Thanks Shelilla thanked for this post

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I actually met a gecko owner the other day who told me she's successfully been raising a superworm colony in her gecko tanks, and that the leos just eat them freely. Is this possible?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Somerville, MA
    Posts
    7,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    76 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I am actually raising a superworm colony in my crested gecko tank and have done the same in my AFT enclosures as well. There were also super worms in the leopard gecko enclosure with the coco fiber. The biggest issue is that the super worms pretty much bury themselves in the substrate so it's hard for the geckos to find them. I leave a small container of gutload in the enclosures that have super worms and beetles and the geckos may be able to catch the super worms that come out to eat.
    I mostly have the super worms in there so I can "harvest" them and feed them to my geckos.
    The advantage is that I have never been successful keeping beetles alive in a gutload substrate, but the coco fiber substrate that gets misted daily works really well for them.
    The primary disadvantage is that they like to chew on things. Currently they are eating the styrofoam background and some of the cork bark. Oh well. I do have a steady supply of super worms for my geckos!

    Aliza
    Likes Shelilla liked this post

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Tennessee USA
    Posts
    468
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    If you want to completly reduce the risk of respiratory issues ( Impaction ) than go with tile, they don't get impaction, stone is a good insulator, it's easy to clean, they can't burrow but it is much more natural for the gecko, and you don't have to replace it, you just wipe it off and it's a one time buy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I have no clue where I would find this to be honest, and I wouldn't want to spend a ton of money on some rocks. I've been setting up a fish tank lately and as I'm sure most know, everything for that is ridiculously overpriced as is... even dirty rocks cost like $7 a pound, absolutely ridiculous.
    I would go out and dig up my own, but all the rocks here are fat and rounded, no nice shale or consistent rock types around really.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Somerville, MA
    Posts
    7,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    76 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I'm not sure where rocks came into the discussion. I use ceramic floor tile and I always choose the cheapest so 3 tiles cost less than $8 usually. Actual rocks are a problem because feeders hide in them (and die and stink). I used to have a dish of smallish rocks for the geckos to dig in and one of my geckos crunched one (probably) and broke her jaw (which ultimately healed on its own) so no more rocks for me!

    Aliza

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I was thinking of shale tiles, never used them so I'm not familiar with them, I assumed like shale rocks but I may have been mistaken.
    That's good to know, but still I like the thought of a softer substrate for her to dig in. What about shale with sand in the cracks, but a small area with coco fiber or another safe substrate for my gecko to burrow?
    And ouch, the poor thing!
    That reminds me of this wild tiger salamander my brother and I found on the ground on the way to school once when we were younger. Looked like it came from someone's backyard gutter (yknow, those things that water flows through all the way to the storm drain in the back? cant remember what they're called) and crawled onto their lawn. Anyways, we brought the freezing thing home and threw it in the only lizard tank we had available which had our one lonely anole and a burrowing lizard. Came home and the thing was in the water dish, jaw split in two nearly, which made us realize why it was probably half dead in the first place, and that we likely wouldn't be able to help it in that condition. So we let it go in the yard and never saw it again.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Tennessee USA
    Posts
    468
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    poor thing, no bodys fault though, that reminds me of a time we found a small yellow spotted salamander in a bunch of snow in our yard, we picked it up and put it in a small terrarium with plenty off water and floating food sticks, it lived through the winter and we let it go after the last frost so, who knows? it could still be alive but, it lived

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Aw thats nice! That would be a happy thought
    Thanks Geecko123 thanked for this post
    Likes Geecko123 liked this post

User Tag List

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •