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  1. #1
    the tags is offline Newbie
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    Default gutloading crickets for crested geckos


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    Can anyone tell me what they think the best cricket gutload is when feeding crested geckos, thanks

  2. #2
    Elizabeth Freer's Avatar
    Elizabeth Freer is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by the tags View Post
    Can anyone tell me what they think the best cricket gutload is when feeding crested geckos, thanks
    Hello ~

    A hearty welcome to Geckos Unlimited.

    Here are my recommendations for feeding crickets. If one feeds a "gutload level" diet 24/7, the crickets will always be ready to be fed off to your geckos.

    Feed crickets/roaches a diet that provides no more than 20% protein and no more than 5% crude fat. Some choices are:
    Albers All Purpose Poultry Feed (from feed store): The label reads 16% minimum protein and 3% minimum fat.
    Dry oatmeal
    Alfalfa hay -- for the 3 wo and older crix
    Collard greens -- especially recommended for high calcium-to-low phosphorous ratio & high lutein
    Carrots (???)-- natural source of beta carotene However, recent research suggests that chameleons do not metabolize beta-carotene into vitamin A at all. Don't know of any similar research done with geckos.
    Whole grain TOTAL -- General Mills dry cereal
    Winter squash

    Do not gutload crickets with puppy, kitten, dog, and/or cat biscuits OR tropical fish flakes. Those are way too high in protein and fat and potentially could cause hepatic lipidosis (fatty liver disease).


    Maurice Pudlo's suggestions for insect gutloads:
    Feeder Insect Diets & Gutload
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 11-21-2012 at 02:04 AM.
    "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain."

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    ===> URGENT: No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside a vivarium EVER <===


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  3. #3
    yamex5 is offline Newbie
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    Hello Elizabeth,

    I just recently found a site that claimed Leopard Geckos are unable to metabolize beta carotene into vitamin A. I'm curious if you happen to have the link to the info you came across and could please share it?

  4. #4
    Elizabeth Freer's Avatar
    Elizabeth Freer is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by the tags View Post
    Can anyone tell me what they think the best cricket gutload is when feeding crested geckos, thanks
    I realize this thread was posted in November 2012, but if you are still looking try this:

    #45---T Rex Calcium Plus Food for Crickets

    Study performed by:

    ARAV
    TCrickets, Acheta domesticus
    J Herpe Med Surg 15[1]:7-12 Jun'05 Experimental Study 13 Refs
    * Mark D. Finke, PhD; Shari U. Dunham, PhD; and Christabel A. Kwabi
    * Mark D Finke Inc., 6811 E Horned Owl Trail, Scottsdale, AZ 85262, USA

    T Rex Calcium Plus Food for Crickets contained sufficient calcium to meet the estimated requirements of insectivorous reptiles and significantly more calcium than those fed the other treatments.

    Provide crickets with water (damp paper towel or sponge), but no fruits or vegetables or they will consume those preferentially over the calcium enriched diet.


    "Each reptile species may have its own unique dietary requirements for calcium. Leopard geckos that were fed crickets gut loaded for greater than 48 hours with diets containing at least 8% calcium were found to have significantly greater body weights as well as higher bone ash and bone calcium than leopard geckos fed crickets maintained on diets of less than 2% calcium (Allen, et al, 1986). Radiographs and histopathology also evidenced better bone integrity in leopard geckos fed higher calcium containing crickets (Allen, 1989). No significant differences in bone ash were attributed to dietary vitamin D3 (Allen, et al, 1986). Also, it has been suggested that the insect prey items be offered slices of orange and apple or other food items as a water source. In order to prevent prey items from gut loading these food items in preference to the high calcium diet provided, it is probably more appropriate to provide a water soaked sponge as a water source (Allen and Oftedal, 1989)."

    thanks cricket4u
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 02-16-2013 at 06:55 PM.
    "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain."

    Click:
    Leopard Gecko Care Sheet
    Health Questionnaire

    ===> URGENT: No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside a vivarium EVER <===


    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Lygodactylus kimhowelli ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ P. tigrinus

  5. #5
    Elizabeth Freer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yamex5 View Post
    Hello Elizabeth,

    I just recently found a site that claimed Leopard Geckos are unable to metabolize beta carotene into vitamin A. I'm curious if you happen to have the link to the info you came across and could please share it?
    The only info I have is this:
    Edit: 13 July 2012
    Relatively recent research suggests that chameleons do not metabolize beta-carotene into vitamin A at all. Does the same apply to geckos?

    If you find the link, please share it.
    "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass. It's about learning to dance in the rain."

    Click:
    Leopard Gecko Care Sheet
    Health Questionnaire

    ===> URGENT: No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside a vivarium EVER <===


    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Lygodactylus kimhowelli ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ P. tigrinus

  6. #6
    Hilde's Avatar
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    Vitamin A deficiency in Insectivorous Geckos | Gecko Time - Dr. Ivan Alfonso


    Vitamin A deficiency in Insectivorous Geckos


    Vitamin A and Reptiles

    Letís start with how it happens. Vitamin A has been deemed lethal and dangerous for a long time in reptile keeping. The reason? It was being used excessively, especially in tortoises, and was leading to very bad issues when it was overdosed. Skin sloughing was commonly seen in tortoises that were given Vitamin A injections. When those horrible side effects were seen, it was immediately assumed that vitamin A was toxic, dangerous and lethal and was basically deemed useless in reptile supplements. The trend became then to use beta carotene as the source for vitamin A because being a precursor, it couldnít be easily overdosed and the reptiles would be able to transform the beta carotene into vitamin A. The idea had some logic behind it, except that not all reptiles are created equal, and insectivorous reptiles canít transform beta carotene into vitamin A no matter how much beta carotene you give them.

  7. #7
    yamex5 is offline Newbie
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    Default Reply to question regarding Vitamin A


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    Thank you all for responding!
    After I posted that question, I later found that Doctor Alfonso, who was the reference I had found, is a member here and that another post clarified this issue. I guess what would be *ideal* would be to know the recommended dosage, but except for injections, which I would want as an absolute last choice, there does not seem to be a way to easily administer the correct dosage. However, thanks to everyone here, especially Dr. Alfonso for taking the time to help us help our pets!

    Sincerely,

    -Mike L.

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