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  1. #1
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    Default Gargoyle Gecko heating and humidity conflict


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    I just got a baby gargoyle gecko 2 weeks ago and I am running into something of an issue. I live in an apartment and we have cats so all of my other animals are in the bedroom.

    The problem is that it is winter time here in Western New York and our heat doesn't reach the bedroom very well. I have the room sitting at about 70-72 degrees all day and night but I read Gargs like temps a bit higher during the day, so a grabbed a spare 25 watt mini ceramic heat emitter. This got the temps to about 75-78, but it made the enclosure very dry. I set up a humidifier in the room to help because it's super dry, and without the CHE I am able to maintain higher humidity.

    The big problem is that this Garg came to me with a slightly wavy tail. The breeder has been great keeping in contact with me about it and we don't believe it to be MBD, but rather dehydration. The tail has improved slightly since I turned off the CHE and kept the humidity high (80% and up for a bit extra time with some dry periods down to 50% while I'm at work).

    So should I not worry about lower temps and focus on keeping the humidity up or is 70-72 too cold for 24 hour temps?

    Here's a pic of her the day she came home. She's mostly fired down in this pic. IMG_20181103_125503.jpg

  2. #2
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    In my opinion (and others may not share it) if the temperature in the room is comfortable for humans wearing clothes but not jackets, it's probably OK for gargs as well. I'm near Boston and during the day in the winter the ambient temperature is probably in the mid 60's. Everyone does OK. If you're really worried, another solution is to get some ZooMed heat cable and tape it (with Nashua tape) on the upper back part of the enclosure. I do this for my red eyed tree frogs. It's connected to a thermostat keeping it around 90F. Some people will say that you will crack the glass if you mist with the heat on but this has not happened for the 4 years I've had them.

    Aliza

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    My tanks are all in the low 70's daytime and upper 60's nighttime during the winters, and so far all (including my garg) are thriving, although they are just a little less active in winter.
    Eileen and Repti-Friends
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Crested Gecko 1.0.0
    Hygge - Gargoyle Gecko 0.1.0
    O.G. (Office Gecko) - Bauer's Chameleon Gecko 1.0.0
    TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Western Bearded Anole 1.0.0

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    Thank you for the reply! She's in a plastic critter keeper right now since she's so small but I was considering a heat pad on a thermostat when I get her a larger glass enclosure!

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    Thanks! I have noticed she eats less since the CHE was turned off, but she was pretty chunky to begin with so it's not too bad for her to slow down. I just was nervous it was too low since she's my first New Caledonian gecko. I was wary of people saying no heat because my only other experience with reptiles is my leopard gecko!

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    A heat pad will only heat up the part of the glass that it sticks to, and not the whole tank. So not sure that will help you. Perhaps others can suggest a better alternative. I think there are some halogen lights that produce heat, that might work a little better than a CHE if you only use it during the day.
    Eileen and Repti-Friends
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Crested Gecko 1.0.0
    Hygge - Gargoyle Gecko 0.1.0
    O.G. (Office Gecko) - Bauer's Chameleon Gecko 1.0.0
    TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Western Bearded Anole 1.0.0

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoLeen View Post
    A heat pad will only heat up the part of the glass that it sticks to, and not the whole tank. So not sure that will help you. Perhaps others can suggest a better alternative. I think there are some halogen lights that produce heat, that might work a little better than a CHE if you only use it during the day.
    That would probably be best for my situation. I'll do some research there. I just wasn't sure if it would still lower the humidity, but I'm guessing if it does it won't be as much as the CHE.

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