Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    655
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default gargoyles built for larger prey?


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    I remember another member mentioning that he felt that gargs were built to handle larger, vertebrate prey. I personally noticed mine's preference for larger insect prey, but never tried offering anything else. I no longer own one, so I have to ask those who do whether or not they've noticed that their gargs have a special taste for vertebrates.
    Nate

    1.0.0 Battlecat - Ted

  2. #2
    Frinta is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    83
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My gargoyle eats large ones, then again for such a relatively small species it has rather large head
    Working with families Lygodactylus, Strophurus, Nephrurus, Sphaerodactylus along with few odd ones.

  3. #3
    mikew1234 is offline Junior member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Posts
    344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I would not attempt to feed vertebrates, like some of my leachies, but I have seen some large leopard geckos take down pinky mice ( I do not recommend it) As for insects, I can attest that they will destroy dubias and red runners no matter the size.

  4. #4
    rhachic is offline Junior member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    499
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My gargoyles eat pinkies and other geckos, so yeah, they will eat "larger vertebrates" but they all seem to take what most people would term appropriately portioned insects as well with vigor.

  5. #5
    mikew1234 is offline Junior member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Posts
    344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I can understand the pinkies, but not the geckos. If they are house geckos, wouldn't you consider that a health risk?

  6. #6
    Frinta is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    83
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I cant understand pinkeys either, maybe frozen geckos but doubt id ever feed live geckos (or unfrozen) unless i grew them myself and had any proof of the advantages
    Working with families Lygodactylus, Strophurus, Nephrurus, Sphaerodactylus along with few odd ones.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    655
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frinta View Post
    I cant understand pinkeys either, maybe frozen geckos but doubt id ever feed live geckos (or unfrozen) unless i grew them myself and had any proof of the advantages
    you should just feed your geckos baby fingers. they're like huge phoenix worms.
    Nate

    1.0.0 Battlecat - Ted

  8. #8
    rhachic is offline Junior member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    499
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Gargoyles are cannibalistic by nature and definitely benefit from protein. I've had a few that were poor eaters as juveniles and slow to grow, but when offered a gecko or pinkie their growth exploded and they ate with vigor. I offer all of my adult female breeding rhacodactylus pinkies, and all happily take them...yes, that includes cresteds and chahouas. I feed the same pinkies you'd feed a snake, and any geckos they've eaten have been cb by me. It would be pretty foolish to assume you could catch a wild gecko and feed it to your pet with no repercussions. Even if I were feeding house geckos they'd be CB as they don't live in my state. The benefits of feeding larger prey items like these is calcium and, obviously, protein. I'm sure there's other trace element/vitamin benefits as well, but the protein and calcium are the reason I use them.
    Also, I worm my tortoises annually and that's just from them eating grass outside. IF i were ever to try to feed my geckos something from outside, I'd have a fecal done and do the same for them if necessary.

  9. #9
    mikew1234 is offline Junior member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Posts
    344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I never stated you were feeding from outside. I assumed with the pinkies that they were store bought, and I have seen everything but cresties and saras accept them, I just choose not to feed them. From what I've read, mice are actually less nutritious than some roach species though. I never feed snakes mice unless it is absolutely necessary since my rat feeders grow two to three times faster than mouse feeders.

    I still don't agree with feeding geckos though. If your feeding other rhacs, you could easily wholesale them to get rid of them. If your feeding sick geckos, why chance passing it to your adults? I could understand deformed babies, but if you have a lot of those, then there's a whole new problem. The only ones I could understand are the common house geckos sold in store for around 5 bucks (which are all wild caught) or if you have a very large colony of mourning geckos, though again, I'd rather throw babies at wholesale than feed to other geckos.

    But to everyone their own.

  10. #10
    rhachic is offline Junior member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    499
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Quote Originally Posted by mikew1234 View Post
    I never stated you were feeding from outside. I assumed with the pinkies that they were store bought, and I have seen everything but cresties and saras accept them, I just choose not to feed them. From what I've read, mice are actually less nutritious than some roach species though. I never feed snakes mice unless it is absolutely necessary since my rat feeders grow two to three times faster than mouse feeders.

    I still don't agree with feeding geckos though. If your feeding other rhacs, you could easily wholesale them to get rid of them. If your feeding sick geckos, why chance passing it to your adults? I could understand deformed babies, but if you have a lot of those, then there's a whole new problem. The only ones I could understand are the common house geckos sold in store for around 5 bucks (which are all wild caught) or if you have a very large colony of mourning geckos, though again, I'd rather throw babies at wholesale than feed to other geckos.

    But to everyone their own.
    I was just laying to rest any thoughts that I may not be using "safe" prey. You also seem to be assuming i'm feeding sick animals to healthy animals or that i'm somehow mass producing deformed animals, both of which I never said.
    And the comparison with snakes isn't valid here because the geckos can't eat rat pinkies anyway. You have to compare geckos and mice to insects as those are applicable prey items here.
    You don't have to agree, i'm just answering the original poster's question. I know many people who do the same thing I do and are well known breeders with large healthy animals.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •