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  1. #1
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    Default Feeding micro geckos


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    I would love to have a micro gecko - specifically, a Wiegmann's Striped Gecko...I have a tank and all the "fixings", so housing is not a problem. But I worry about feeding. How hard is it to keep a supply of food for these tiny guys? I don't know what is involved in keeping a supply of tiny insects that don't pupate, or last long enough to feed a single micro gecko without having to order every other week and risk a supplier running out of food...

    I get roaches and superworms for my other geckos and anole, and haven't had a problem with those. I tried black soldier fly larvae for a while, but they usually pupated before being used up, and I ended up having to dispose of them. Pinhead crickets seem difficult to keep. Any tips for me? I won't get a micro unless I know I can take care of it properly.
    Eileen and Repti-Friends
    TAD (Tiny Ancient Dinosaur) - Crested Gecko 1.0.0
    Hygge - Gargoyle Gecko 0.1.0
    O.G. (Office Gecko) - Bauer's Chameleon Gecko 1.0.0
    TBD (Tiny Badass Dragon) - Western Bearded Anole 1.0.0

  2. #2
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    The smallest gecko species I keep are Mourning geckos, however the neonates are pretty tiny, so hopefully my experience will be relevant.
    I feed the little ones primarily fruit flies, bean beetles, and pangea diet. I don't think Gonatodes eat prepared diets though. Fruit flies and bean beetles are very easy and inexpensive to culture yourself. Bean beetles are more nutritious, but prey items should be dusted with vitamins, as I'm sure you are aware. The down side of these insects are the relatively short life cycle, which will require you to make new cultures regularly. If you don't, you may find yourself running out of food. There is also a bit of a learning curve to handling these insects so that you don't lose them while dusting and feeding.
    You could also purchase tiny crickets. However most pet stores don't sell 1/8" crickets, and it probably isn't worth buying them in bulk for just one or two geckos.
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  3. #3
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    I have a few Sphaerodactlus in addition to the other geckos. When the weather is good, I get 1000 1/8" crickets (which are essentially pinheads). Since I'm getting crickets every 2 weeks to keep everyone else fed, whatever of the smallest crickets that are still left after 2 weeks are too big to feed the micro geckos so they get boosted up to the next size. So, if you can keep the crickets successfully and you have other geckos it works out well. Lately I've had a hard time keeping these little guys alive, possibly because of the cold, though my house isn't that cold. I have a special deal with my local reptile store of 1000 crickets for $20. During the winter, it's making more sense for me to get 50 pinheads four times a week which comes to $20, but the net effect is the same and I have fewer deaths. I do fill in with fruit flies but I don't culture them.

    Aliza
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