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    Default Green Tree Skinks


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    Thought I would share some photos of my group of Lamprolepis smaragdina, or commonly called Gree Tree Skinks... These are in excellent condition, great eaters, and love the sun... Hopefully I may get some eggs.. They can drop 2 at a time. Gestation period about 55 days... Enjoy. JERRY
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    Hi Jerry!

    They are indeed great species.
    Do you knew they need a high insolation? Thus reptiglo 3. and up is a must together with the high temp spot around 30-32 Celsius grades.
    They also like dence vegetation in enclosure and high level of humidity.
    Rather nervous they anyway is a great display animals, bred well in captivity.
    Several years ago i kept and bred both forms of this species - entire green like yours, which is common around the hobby and other half green-half brownish-olive which is more nice as green color is something like of the color of the marine green.
    Last edited by Mikhail F. Bagaturov; 09-06-2009 at 11:47 AM.
    ======

    All the best,
    Mikhail from Russia

    The Leningrad Zoo, St.Petersburg, Russia
    "Department of Insectarium and Amphibians"
    Zootechnist

    Wellcome to: http://tarantulas.tropica.ru (Theraphosids of the World)
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    Default They are quite interesting

    and you are right, they immediately hide once they hear you or see you... Some have acclimated themselves, but most are very secretive... They love to bask in the sun..

    The other species that you mentioned is Dasia olivacea. I had those, but there is no comparison. Those were called Emerald Green Tree skinks... JERRY

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    I do love aboreal lizards. Those skinks are very nice! Some of my unusual Anolis sp. can be secretive also, so I put a web cam in the room pointed to the enclosure to see what they do from another room. Facinating activity....

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLYGUY View Post
    The other species that you mentioned is Dasia olivacea. I had those, but there is no comparison. Those were called Emerald Green Tree skinks... JERRY
    No, Jerry, you`re wrong.
    I know Dasia olivacea well, it`s also come from regular indonesian imports into Europe. It`s entire olive brown species biger in size. And the species i was talking about is what that time considered as other form of Dasia (old name) smaragdina - half green, half brownish-olive and lacks black spots which is characteristic of "nominal form".

    For example, here's two forms in comparison: http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/6932/dsc000088qa.jpg
    Last edited by Mikhail F. Bagaturov; 09-06-2009 at 11:48 AM.
    ======

    All the best,
    Mikhail from Russia

    The Leningrad Zoo, St.Petersburg, Russia
    "Department of Insectarium and Amphibians"
    Zootechnist

    Wellcome to: http://tarantulas.tropica.ru (Theraphosids of the World)

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    Default Yes I knew there were some

    classification discrepancies, but I am very happy with this species and hopefully I may be able to breed them.... What I really need to know is how to differentiate there sex... I found it very difficult to know the difference between the male and female... I have a colony of 12 and they seem to get along as I have not seen any fighting..

    They have plenty of food, and the tank is large and lush with foilage... I will be breaking them up next week into groups of 3 so I can observe them better.... They also take baby fruit food.... Regards, JERRY
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    Sex differenciation is very simple in this species: males had yellow base of rear foots. Females lacks such coloration.
    ======

    All the best,
    Mikhail from Russia

    The Leningrad Zoo, St.Petersburg, Russia
    "Department of Insectarium and Amphibians"
    Zootechnist

    Wellcome to: http://tarantulas.tropica.ru (Theraphosids of the World)

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    Default Mikhail

    Thanks so much for that information... When I have an opportunity, I will take some photos to see what I exactly have ! When you say "yellow base of rare foots" do you mean 1 foot or both ? also, are the females obvious with eggs when they are gravid ? Thanks for all the help. JERRY
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    Default Mikhail, here is a photo

    of the back legs.. There is yellow on one leg as the photo shows... I have not checked all the others as I do not have the time now... But would this be a male ? Does the female have any yellow at all ? Kindly let me know...and thanks again... JERRY
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    Hello Jerry!

    As far as i remember female absolutely lacks any yellow coloration on rear legs heels. only male has it. And there is a male on your photo indeed.
    As for the possibility to tell if the female gravid or not - it is really hard to tell as like most of scincid lizards.
    ======

    All the best,
    Mikhail from Russia

    The Leningrad Zoo, St.Petersburg, Russia
    "Department of Insectarium and Amphibians"
    Zootechnist

    Wellcome to: http://tarantulas.tropica.ru (Theraphosids of the World)

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