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    Default New to the hobby


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    I'm very new to the hobby. I'm a foster parent and had two boys come to me with reptiles. They had a House Gecko and an Iguana. They didn't know they had to replace the UV bulb regularly. The Iguana got calcium deficient and didn't make it. I wasn't much of a reptile fan. I babysat the gecko while they were at camp and developed a soft spot for the little guy. I told them they can have pet reptiles within reason as long as they research the animal and we are able to properly care for them. I started researching gecko care to make sure the gecko didn't end up going down the same road as the Iguana.

    Fast forward a little bit... One of the boys has a juvenile beardie and the other has an Ice Blue Tegu. They appreciated my interest in the hobby even though I'm not a huge fan of reptiles. They saved their money and bought their new reptiles. While they were picking them up with my wife, they picked out a new enclosure and supplies so I could have their gecko. I don't see it much, unless I can go look at it before my wife gets up and turns on lights.

    I'm doing research and trying to decide what kind of gecko to get and how I want to set up a vivarium. I want to get a day gecko, so I can watch it in the evening or on days off. Right now I'm looking mostly at Neon Day Geckos, Cameroon Dwarf Geckos and Pea**** Geckos. I know those are pretty popular geckos and they may be hard to come by.

    I'm sure I'll have plenty of questions once I get closer to jumping down the rabbit hole. Thank you in advance for your help.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to Geckos Unlimited, Eiverg!

    House Gecko is a generic term for a few different geckos. Please share a photo. Perhaps GU can identify it?

    Here's a Peac ock Day Gecko (Phelsuma quadriocellata) Care Sheet from Z. Brinks @ Josh's Frogs. Josh's Frogs may sell these as well as the Neon Day Gecko (Phelsuma klemmeri). The Cameroon Dwarf Gecko's scientific name is Lygodactylus conraui.



    Phelsuma quadriocellata (Peac ock Day Gecko) Care Sheet
    Source: Z. Brinks from Josh's Frogs
    12 September 2019




    LOCATION & DESCRIPTION
    The Peac ock Day Gecko (Phelsuma quadriocellata) is a brightly colored species found in Madagascar. Their name refers to the conspicuous black spot outlined in blue that is found behind their forelegs. Unlike others in its genus, its widespread range and abundance on the island has given this species some protection from being endangered. Like all day geckos, they tend to be too quick and nervous for handling, but they make great pets to watch due to their bright colors and diurnal nature, both characteristics of the genus.

    COLORATION
    Like all geckos in the genus Phelsuma, these geckos exhibit bright and attractive colors. Peac ock Day geckos are dark green or bluish green, often with a blue tail. Reddish orange spots speckle their back. Their most unique feature are the black spots outlined in blue right behind their forelegs. They also have two smaller black spots right in front of their hind legs.

    HOUSING
    A 12x12x18 Exo Terra enclosure can house a pair of Peac ock Day Geckos. Larger enclosures can house more individuals, but it is recommended that males are not housed together. A variety of substrate mixtures can be used with coco fiber or peat moss as a base. Josh’s Frogs BioBedding works very well with this species; in addition to holding moisture, it will help propagate and maintain live plants and isopod populations in the setup (both highly recommended with this species).

    As an arboreal species, these geckos thrive in a setup filled with pieces of cork bark, branches, large bamboo sticks, and live or fake plants. It is essential to provide an enclosure with plenty of climbing material and hiding places. Peac ock Day Geckos can be kept at ambient temperatures ranging 72-78F. A basking area of around 85F should also be provided using a halogen light. As with all day geckos, given their diurnal activity, UV light is recommended.

    Ambient humidity for this species should remain around 60-70%. Misting every day is strongly recommended to keep the substrate moist and also provide water droplets from which the geckos can drink. There should be enough ventilation such that any water droplets on the walls of the enclosure dry out by the next day. A shallow water dish can be supplied but is not necessary if these geckos are misted daily. Both temperature and humidity can be monitored with a thermometer/hygrometer.

    SIZE
    These day geckos will grow to be around 4-5.5 inches as adults.

    DIET
    Peac ock Day Geckos are omnivorous. In the wild, they consume insects as well as nectar or soft fruit. In captivity, they enjoy a staple diet of small crickets and gecko diet mix. A good rule of thumb for size is to only offer insects whose length does not exceed the space in between the gecko’s eyes. Generally, hatchling Peac ock Day Geckos should be fed melanogaster fruit flies and gecko diet mix, adding ⅛-inch crickets as they grow older. Reaching adulthood, they can continue to be offered gecko diet mix once a week as well as -inch crickets. Feeder insects should be dusted with a vitamin/mineral supplement.

    SEX
    Peac ock Day Geckos can be challenging to sex when young, but are fairly straightforward to sex when they are mature. Females are larger, and tend to have prominent calcium sacs under their chin. Males have a row of enlarged femoral pores on the underside of their thighs, flanking the cloaca. The scales around these pores are often yellow.

    BREEDING
    During the breeding season, these geckos will lay a pair of eggs every month or two. Eggs are often adhered to plants, branches, or the enclosure walls. Attempting to remove them from where they are glued will break the egg.


    Peac ock Day Geckos are listed as having a stable population by the IUCN:
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 07-24-2021 at 03:29 PM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    I finally got some pics of the gecko. They're not the best because anytime there's movement near the enclosure, it hides. It was actually out this afternoon and I was able to sneak up and get some pics before it teleported for cover.
    IMG_2606.jpgIMG_2607.jpg
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    This is a fan-footed gecko.
    Thanks Eiverg thanked for this post
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    Thank you. Just read a little about them and it explains a lot. That thing is insanely fast.
    I'll back off on the misting as I've been trying to keep the enclosure at 60-70% humidity. I've been dusting with Calcium/D3 on 2 of the 3 weekly feedings. I'll also add a UVB bulb to the enclosure; I've been using a ceramic bulb. It's only been without UVB for about 2 weeks.

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    Thanks again for identifying my gecko. I got some pictures of her on the top screen of her enclosure and she appears to be female. There's a very knowledgeable person at the LPS that also agrees she is female. She was in a smaller aquarium that was about 8 gallons. She is now in a 12x12x18 exo terra. It took her a couple of days to come out of hiding. She's still easily spooked, but getting used to her new home. I think she'll be much happier with the tall enclosure.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eiverg View Post
    Thanks again for identifying my gecko. I got some pictures of her on the top screen of her enclosure and she appears to be female. There's a very knowledgeable person at the LPS that also agrees she is female. She was in a smaller aquarium that was about 8 gallons. She is now in a 12x12x18 exo terra. It took her a couple of days to come out of hiding. She's still easily spooked, but getting used to her new home. I think she'll be much happier with the tall enclosure.
    What good news, Eiverg!
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    If you are going to decide on a Pea**** (Phelsuma quadriocellata) I do not agree with the above article that a pair can be housed together in a 12x12x18 tank. Pea****s are very territorial and even breeding pairs will fight. I recently had to separate my pair that are in a 24x18x24 tank because my male was becoming aggressive to his mate and not letting her eat. Also, keeping a group of females together is not at all advised, since they often become aggressive to each other and can even kill the other one. If you decide on a pair of Pea****s you need a min of a 18x18x24 tank and be prepared with a spare tank to separate. Also and babies that hatch must be immediately removed to their own tanks because they will become snack food for the adults.

    Klemmeri are a lot of fun to watch and can be kept in a group even with their babies. It is advised not to keep multiple males as one will become dominant. Again it helps to watch for aggression and be prepared to separate if necessary. Klemmeri needs a tank with all escape holes sealed including the cord holes because they are great escape artists, but you can keep a pair or even two females in a 12x12x18 tank, of course, bigger is always appreciated. I find both species very enjoyable.
    Thanks Eiverg, Mourning_Gecko thanked for this post

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    Quote Originally Posted by czaha View Post
    If you are going to decide on a Pea**** (Phelsuma quadriocellata) I do not agree with the above article that a pair can be housed together in a 12x12x18 tank. Pea****s are very territorial and even breeding pairs will fight. I recently had to separate my pair that are in a 24x18x24 tank because my male was becoming aggressive to his mate and not letting her eat. Also, keeping a group of females together is not at all advised, since they often become aggressive to each other and can even kill the other one. If you decide on a pair of Pea****s you need a min of a 18x18x24 tank and be prepared with a spare tank to separate. Also and babies that hatch must be immediately removed to their own tanks because they will become snack food for the adults.

    Klemmeri are a lot of fun to watch and can be kept in a group even with their babies. It is advised not to keep multiple males as one will become dominant. Again it helps to watch for aggression and be prepared to separate if necessary. Klemmeri needs a tank with all escape holes sealed including the cord holes because they are great escape artists, but you can keep a pair or even two females in a 12x12x18 tank, of course, bigger is always appreciated. I find both species very enjoyable.
    Welcome to Geckos Unlimited, czaha!

    I really appreciate your feedback as a keeper of Phelsuma quadriocellata and of Phelsuma klemmeri. The more input Geckos Unlimited has, the better our geckos will do.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Likes Mourning_Gecko liked this post

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    Thank you for the input. I'm kind of leaning towards the P. klemmeri and would do an 18x18x24 enclosure for them. I'm not in a hurry since the longer I wait, the more time I have for learning about care requirements.

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