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    Default Giant mealworms?


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    Hello everyone,
    I've been giving my leo a mix of crickets and mealworms, though, at the store they had these giant mealworms which seemed appropiate size for Leia since she is 8.5" long now. She is doing well, she is now 62grams, I have not seen her lose any weight but, wondering are these mealworms like steroids or something? I tried offering her a hornworm, did not appeal to her. Oddly enough, my bearded dragon absolutely loves them so I thought she would enjoy it since its new/different kind of feeder and its bright colored. Is there downfalls to using giant mealworms or should I get her something else? I tried offering dubias she doesnt seem to really like them. Just trying to offer variety in her diet Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reptilelady View Post
    Hello everyone,
    I've been giving my leo a mix of crickets and mealworms, though, at the store they had these giant mealworms which seemed appropiate size for Leia since she is 8.5" long now. She is doing well, she is now 62grams, I have not seen her lose any weight but, wondering are these mealworms like steroids or something? I tried offering her a hornworm, did not appeal to her. Oddly enough, my bearded dragon absolutely loves them so I thought she would enjoy it since its new/different kind of feeder and its bright colored. Is there downfalls to using giant mealworms or should I get her something else? I tried offering dubias she doesnt seem to really like them. Just trying to offer variety in her diet Thanks!
    Thanks for updating. Leia is doing well!

    As far as I know the "giant mealworms" packaged by Timberline are sterile.

    Most leos love hornworms. Maybe Leia would love one the next time?

    Have you tried repti-worms (black soldier fly larvae)? Some leos like them; others don't. The largest BSFL = 3/4 inch.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 04-12-2018 at 03:28 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
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  3. #3
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    Click: #6---Gutload Ingredients for Bugs & Worms......Olimpia -- August 2013

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    "Lettuce (except dark, leafy greens) is just water and nutritionally irrelevant. People don't even give lettuce to tortoises and iguanas because it's worthless as food. The same could be said for potatoes. Fish flakes are very high in protein and this can lead to a build-up of uric acid in feeders/reptiles and end up causing gout. A little now and then is fine but this should never be the bulk of any gutload.

    "A commercial gutloading food like Bug Burger or Superload (both by Repashy), Cricket Crack, Dinofuel, etc. is going to make your life easier AND provide a nutritious diet to your crickets at the same time. Avoid Fluker's gutloads, as they are super feeble in their formulas.

    "If you opt for making your own gutload at home, here is a list of great ingredients to use:
    Best: mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion leaves, collard greens, escarole lettuce, papaya, watercress, and alfalfa.
    Good: sweet potato, carrots, oranges, mango, butternut squash, kale, apples, beet greens, blackberries, bok choy, and green beans.
    Dry food: bee pollen, organic non-salted sunflower seeds, spirulina, dried seaweed, flax seed, and organic non-salted almonds.
    Avoid as much as possible: potatoes, cabbage, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, corn, grains, beans, oats, bread, cereal, meat, eggs, dog food, cat food, fish food, canned or dead insects, vertebrates.
    ------>"As far as how to keep crickets, a large plastic storage container will work well, but really anything with smooth sides. On a large plastic container you can cut out a panel on two sides and glue on aluminum screening (and do the same on the lid) and this will provide plenty of air flow. Bad air is the #1 killer of crickets, along with poor hydration, so having good airflow will make the difference if you start getting into bulk orders of crickets.

    ------>"And I just dust mine using a large plastic cup. You don't need to coat crickets in a thick layer of calcium. Just put a pinch of calcium into the cup, get some crickets into the cup, swirl, and dump. The crickets end up evenly but lightly coated and there isn't any excess calcium left over."

    "Hope that helps!"

    (Last edited by Olimpia; 08-21-2013 at 02:03 PM.)
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)
    Thanks Reptilelady thanked for this post
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  4. #4
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    She will eat dubias! I only put 1 small/medium size in the "mealworm dish bowl" and just left it in there and noticed it wasnt in there in the morning. I checked to see if maybe it got out but havent seen it since. Since they are meatier than crickets, which I assume, she doesnt need to eat a lot of them like she does with crickets. Usually anywhere from 4-6 crickets she eats. Not sure if this is a good amount? Also, I have been feeding her every 3 to 4 days to replicate in the wild conditions. She seems to be enjoying that better, plus she started to get side boobs so once i cut back on the food I noticed its been getting less noticable. I ordered some BSFL's so im hoping she will enjoy those as well. Then again, she's extremely picky eater but having variety in the diet is good so not complaining
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    Click: #6---Gutload Ingredients for Bugs & Worms......Olimpia -- August 2013

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

    "Lettuce (except dark, leafy greens) is just water and nutritionally irrelevant. People don't even give lettuce to tortoises and iguanas because it's worthless as food. The same could be said for potatoes. Fish flakes are very high in protein and this can lead to a build-up of uric acid in feeders/reptiles and end up causing gout. A little now and then is fine but this should never be the bulk of any gutload.

    "A commercial gutloading food like Bug Burger or Superload (both by Repashy), Cricket Crack, Dinofuel, etc. is going to make your life easier AND provide a nutritious diet to your crickets at the same time. Avoid Fluker's gutloads, as they are super feeble in their formulas.



    ------>"As far as how to keep crickets, a large plastic storage container will work well, but really anything with smooth sides. On a large plastic container you can cut out a panel on two sides and glue on aluminum screening (and do the same on the lid) and this will provide plenty of air flow. Bad air is the #1 killer of crickets, along with poor hydration, so having good airflow will make the difference if you start getting into bulk orders of crickets.

    ------>"And I just dust mine using a large plastic cup. You don't need to coat crickets in a thick layer of calcium. Just put a pinch of calcium into the cup, get some crickets into the cup, swirl, and dump. The crickets end up evenly but lightly coated and there isn't any excess calcium left over."

    "Hope that helps!"

    (Last edited by Olimpia; 08-21-2013 at 02:03 PM.)
    Thanks Elizabeth! I will have to try the repshasy gutload burger. Looks to be complete nutrition!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reptilelady View Post
    Thanks Elizabeth! I will have to try the repshasy gutload burger. Looks to be complete nutrition!
    You're welcome.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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