Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Leopard Gecko keeping eyes closed


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Hello everyone!

    I have a 3 year old leopard gecko, who as of recently, has been keeping both eyes closed. At first, it was only one, so I figured it had something to do with the substrate I was using at the time (eco-earth). I had changed the substrate to paper towel and increased the temperature to a max of 92 degrees on the warm side. I also started using flukers repti eye drops, but that didn't help at all. Recently in the past week, Smaug has also begun to keep his other eye closed as well, where the only time he'd open it was during mealtime. He is still acting, eating and pooping normally and doesn't seem to be in any pain. When opened, his eye appears to be watery but there is no mucus in or around the eye and when closed, it looks normal.

    While I am not 100% sure of the exact morph, he is in the tremper albino family which I've heard are sensitive to UVB light. I say this because I had to keep him in a temporary tank in the basement when the A/C went out and his usual tank had dangerously high temperatures. During this time, I had used the zoo med 60w daytime light bulb that came with the kit I had bought years ago to create the day/night cycle, and after this period of time, his second eye began to close. The same thing happened when his first eye began to close after a "testing period" with the light.

    If anyone can help, it would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Somerville, MA
    Posts
    7,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    86 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Can you give us an idea of what the lighting situation is now and how long it's been this way? Is the gecko eating and is it active?

    Aliza

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Sure thing! So for the 3 years I've had Smaug, I never used any forms of daytime lighting. During winter, I'd use the heat lamp to increase the overall temperature since it gets really cold where I live. Only recently, when I had Smaug in a temporary tank in the basement during an A/C outage, I used the ZooMed 60w daytime bulb to create the day and night cycle. I only used the bulb for a week until I moved Smaug back into his original tank which is kept in my bedroom where there is ample sun. It was only after this period that his eyes began to slowly close, to the point now, where he hardly opens his eyes.

    He is eating normally, the last time I fed him was on Tuesday where he ate 5 mealworms and 3 waxworms. He is also behaving normally and is active. During feeding times when he opens his eyes, he is alert and hyper which I hope is a good sign.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Somerville, MA
    Posts
    7,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    86 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    His appetite and activity level are encouraging. I have no idea what's causing the problem now that he's back in his normal environment. You could consider a vet visit.

    Aliza

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    22,253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    85 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)

    Default

    IF you get this figured out (that your leo's eyes are NOT compromised), all you really need to provide a day/night cycle is a standard 15 watt incandescent white bulb housed inside a 5.5 inch diameter Fluker's dome dimmed to half power by either an inline dimmer or a Lutron dimmer. Time this ON for about 11 hours per day.

    That's precisely what I use for my 16.5 yo leo Cha. Her 20 long (30 x 12 x 12 inches tall) enclosure sits in a darkish corner of my living room across the room from a shaded southern deck sliding door and eastern windows. I've had her most her life.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 06-11-2021 at 02:01 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I'm definitely planning on booking a vet appointment, though the only issue is that the exotic vet is booked up for the next couple of weeks. In the meantime, I'm just trying to do some more research on what might be causing this and monitoring Smaug.

    I have been reading up on vitamin A deficiencies in reptiles, where a common symptom is the reptile keeping its eyes closed. While I have been using the zoomed reptivite with d3 since October, I'm worried that the 2 years where I was only giving calcium with d3 (I wasn't aware that reptiles needed vitamin A) might have compromised his system thus resulting in the eyes staying closed.
    Likes Elizabeth Freer liked this post

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thank you for the recommendation! I'm definitely working on providing a day/night cycle that won't compromise my gecko's health and never even thought of using standard light bulbs.
    Likes Elizabeth Freer liked this post

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    22,253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    85 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stark16 View Post
    I'm definitely planning on booking a vet appointment, though the only issue is that the exotic vet is booked up for the next couple of weeks. In the meantime, I'm just trying to do some more research on what might be causing this and monitoring Smaug.

    I have been reading up on vitamin A deficiencies in reptiles, where a common symptom is the reptile keeping its eyes closed. While I have been using the zoomed reptivite with d3 since October, I'm worried that the 2 years where I was only giving calcium with d3 (I wasn't aware that reptiles needed vitamin A) might have compromised his system thus resulting in the eyes staying closed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stark16 View Post
    Thank you for the recommendation! I'm definitely working on providing a day/night cycle that won't compromise my gecko's health and never even thought of using standard light bulbs.
    You're welcome! Even though higher wattage bulbs are no longer sold for household use in the USA, 15 watt and 25 watt incandescent bulbs are still items. Can you buy 15 watt bulbs in Canada?

    Smaug and retinol: A wee bit of retinol (pre-vitamin A) 1x per week is all that's needed. Pro-vitamin A (found in beta carotene and carrots) has a different effect. Vitamin D3 is fat soluble. A single D3 dose as in Reptivite multivitamins with D3 sticks around in a leo's body for about one week and metabolizes ALL plain calcium carbonate ingested by a leo that week.

    What type bedding are the mealworms on? It's important to feed mealworms too prior to feeding them to Smaug. Cut back waxworms to 1-2 per month. Waxworms are a good source of vitamin C. Otherwise they are super high in fat.

    Weekly Schedule 126 for Leopard Geckos 18 months old +
    (withOUT UVB)
    Adapted for leo Smaug
    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) symptoms include uneven (lopsided) gait, walking on one or both "elbows", bowed limbs, belly dragging, and an underbite. Difficulty chewing should be closely monitored.
    The Reptile Supply Company (916-226-4089) based in Lodi, California stocks Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3.

    • Monday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's Reptivite multivitamins with D3
    • Thursday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's Repti Calcium (plain calcium carbonate) withOUT D3
    • Saturday > > Optional: mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting



    For link 126 click: Weekly Feeding & Supplement Schedule 126 for leopard geckos 18 months old +
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 06-11-2021 at 07:24 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Turns out I can buy 15w bulbs in Canada, so I'll be buying that soon for Smaug.

    I haven't heard of giving retinol to leopard geckos before, what type of products should I be looking for if I am looking to start giving Smaug some retinol? I usually dust the feeder insects in the reptivite every feeding which is about 2 times a week. I also have calcium without d3 that I used to give prior to switching to reptivite. I had read that reptivite also has calcium in it which was why I stopped giving the other.

    The mealworms are on a mixture of pine bedding and the oats that were in the container they arrived in. I feed them every day and always take out any old food that wasn't eaten in the first 24 hours of being placed in their container. What I feed the mealworms is a variety of greens including carrots, cucumbers, and the occasional potato. It's quite rare to get a container of live waxworms from the pet store I go to so those really are delicacies.

    Thank you for the feeding schedule! I've made a note of it, and will start implementing it as soon as possible. I might just change the dates around since Smaug is usually fed on Tuesdays and Fridays.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    USA: Oregon
    Posts
    22,253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    85 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)

    Default


    LOG IN TO CLOSE THIS AD   


    Quote Originally Posted by Stark16 View Post
    Turns out I can buy 15w bulbs in Canada, so I'll be buying that soon for Smaug.

    I haven't heard of giving retinol to leopard geckos before, what type of products should I be looking for if I am looking to start giving Smaug some retinol? I usually dust the feeder insects in the reptivite every feeding which is about 2 times a week. I also have calcium without d3 that I used to give prior to switching to reptivite. I had read that reptivite also has calcium in it which was why I stopped giving the other.

    The mealworms are on a mixture of pine bedding and the oats that were in the container they arrived in. I feed them every day and always take out any old food that wasn't eaten in the first 24 hours of being placed in their container. What I feed the mealworms is a variety of greens including carrots, cucumbers, and the occasional potato. It's quite rare to get a container of live waxworms from the pet store I go to so those really are delicacies.

    Thank you for the feeding schedule! I've made a note of it, and will start implementing it as soon as possible. I might just change the dates around since Smaug is usually fed on Tuesdays and Fridays.
    I'm glad you can buy 15 watt incandescent bulbs in Canada! Maybe Smaug's 60 watt light is just too bright?

    Smaug is in luck! There is NO need to search further for retinol! Both Zoo Med's Reptivite multivitamins (with & withOUT D3) contain the same amount of retinol (pre-formed vitamin A). A wee bit of retinol/Reptivite multivitamins at 1 feeding per week is all the retinol (& multivitamins) Smaug needs. More is not better. Then lightly dust feeders with Zoo Med's Repti Calcium withOUT D3 at the second feeding per week.

    Let's switch out the mealworm's pine bedding for something else. We are what we eat. Oats are relatively high in phosphorus. Phosphorus impacts the absorption of calcium. Fluker's High Calcium Cricket Diet is OK for a mealworm bedding, if that's all you can find. Just feed the mealworms other foods from Olimpia's list 24 hours or so before feeding Smaug those particular mealworms.

    Even though you've not used them up, be sure to replace Zoo Med's Reptivite when it expires. I've heard that plain calcium carbonate NEVER expires.

    Gutload Ingredients for Bugs & Worms . . . . . . thanks to Olimpia -- August 2013

    "A commercial gut loading food like Bug Burger or Superload (both by Repashy), Cricket Crack, Dinofuel, etc. is going to make your life easier AND provide a nutritious diet to your crickets at the same time. Avoid Fluker's gutloads, as they are super feeble in their formulas.

    "If you opt for making your own gutload at home, here's a list of great ingredients to use:
    BEST: mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion flowers & leaves, collard greens, escarole lettuce, papaya, watercress, and alfalfa.
    GOOD: sweet potato, carrots, (oranges), mango, butternut squash, kale, apples, beet greens, blackberries, bok choy, and green beans.
    DRY FOOD: bee pollen, organic non-salted sunflower seeds, spirulina, dried seaweed, flax seed, and organic non-salted almonds.
    AVOID AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE: potatoes, cabbage, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, corn, grains, beans, oats, bread, cereal, meat, eggs, dog food, cat food, fish food, canned or dead insects, vertebrates."

    #98---Common Mealworm & Superworm Beddings -- Use something else!

    See below for low phosphorus mealworm and superworm bedding recommendations.


    We wish to approximate a 1.5-2.0 calcium : 1.0 phosphorus ratio with the insects and worms we feed our geckos.

    With the exception of Phoenix worms (BSFL) all the bugs and worms we feed our geckos are much higher in phosphorus than calcium. Phosphorus impairs the absorption of calcium. Feeding high phosphorus foods to the bugs/worms makes correcting that imbalance impossible. That's why supplements containing very low amounts of phosphorus as well as very low phosphorus content in the feeders' diets are important.

    We lightly dust bugs and worms to correct this imbalance. Dusting should be secondary. Build a better feeder body! Feed bugs and worms the highest quality dry diet possible 24/7 + add low phosphorus/high calcium veggies in a dish off to the side (for example: pesticide-free collard greens and dandelion greens).

    Wheat germ, wheat bran, and oats contain HUGE amounts of phosphorus in comparison to calcium. Check out the ratios! I don't recommend the following beddings either for keeping or for breeding mealworms or superworms.

    EXAMPLES OF HIGH PHOSPHORUS MEALWORM BEDDINGS!
    Click: Foods List
    Enter some food like wheat germ
    Scroll down for calcium and phosphorus per 100 grams and compare

    Kretschmer's Wheat Germ is commonly sold in the USA.


    WHAT CAN BE USED INSTEAD? Here are some low phosphorus mealworm and superworm dry diets and beddings sold in the USA.

    Finely grind the following foods in a Krups coffee/spice grinder or place them in a tough plastic bag and pound them with a hammer.
    1. Already ground ---> Click: Professional Reptiles' Pro Gutload
    2. Albers’ All Purpose Poultry Feed
    3. Purina Layena Crumbles

    Here’s a caution about poultry feeds in general.
    I only recommend Albers' or Purina Layena Crumbles' brands of poultry feed. If you cannot find those in the USA, don't buy poultry feed. Some poultry laying feeds contain diatomaceous earth. Diatomaceous earth is a natural antiparasitic for bird flocks. If ingested by insects, diatomaceous earth is fatal.

    Diatomaceous earth should be listed on the poultry feed's label if it's in that product.
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 06-13-2021 at 02:47 PM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

User Tag List

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •