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    Default Moving with leopard gecko


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    I am moving to a new house that is about 20-25 minutes away from my current place. I am looking for recommendations on the best way to move him. I am also getting him a bigger tank and switching to bioactive from slate tile. I was going to have the new tank setup for a few days to monitor temperature and humidity levels before introducing him.

    Would it be better to:

    1. Leave him at the old place until the new tank is good to go in the house and then bring
    him and put him directly in.

    2. Bring his current enclosure and set it up in the new house and leave him in it until the
    new tank is ready to go.

    I'm just looking to cause the least amount of stress. I feel like it's not a good idea to move him and immediately put him in the new tank since it is so different than what he currently has. I was thinking that if bring him right away and put him in his old tank it will give him a chance to decompress from the move in a familiar environment.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by vince51893 View Post
    I am moving to a new house that is about 20-25 minutes away from my current place. I am looking for recommendations on the best way to move him. I am also getting him a bigger tank and switching to bioactive from slate tile. I was going to have the new tank setup for a few days to monitor temperature and humidity levels before introducing him.

    Would it be better to:

    1. Leave him at the old place until the new tank is good to go in the house and then bring
    him and put him directly in.

    2. Bring his current enclosure and set it up in the new house and leave him in it until the
    new tank is ready to go.


    I'm just looking to cause the least amount of stress. I feel like it's not a good idea to move him and immediately put him in the new tank since it is so different than what he currently has. I was thinking that if bring him right away and put him in his old tank it will give him a chance to decompress from the move in a familiar environment.
    I vote for option 2. As soon as you've physically relocated, bring your leo to your new home. This way you'll be able to monitor him better. I send you BOTH good wishes during this transition!

    How will you be heating & lighting your leo's new home? Will you be adding UVB? Details, please. Some slate is a welcome addition as a basking site within a bioactive enclosure, because slate is superior in absorbing heat.

    1. How old is your leo?
    2. Which supplements (brand, exact name, & frequency) are you using now?
    3. What are the dimensions of his new enclosure?

    IF you'll be using UVB, there's usually an adjustment period before you nearly totally switch to supplements withOUT vitamin D3.

    ***** When your leopard gecko is taking advantage of appropriate UVB rays, Dr. Fran Baines DVM strongly recommends a backup dose of powdered D3 @ 1-2 feedings per month! Just substitute 1 D3 calcium dusting for 1 plain calcium dusting during those 1-2 weeks only. *****
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 04-24-2021 at 02:37 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    So originally I was also leaning towards option 2, but then I started thinking that it might be better to just have him do everything at once instead of two separate stressful events. What do you think about that?

    I am going to be using a shade dweller uvb, I have actually already started using it so he can kind of get used to it. I also purchased a DHP, but am waiting to start using it when the new enclosure is set up. I definitely plan on using slate in the new bioactive enclosure.

    As for your other questions:

    1. I believe he is between 7-8 months, I do not have the exact age.
    2. I use Zoo-Med repti calcium. Before I started using the UVB, I used the version with D3, but now I use the
    non D-3 version. I dust at every meal, he used to eat everyday, but now he doesn't always eat everyday,
    sometimes every other day or so. I also dust with Herpivite once a week.
    3. His new enclosure is going to be 36x18x18. He will be coming from a 20L enclosure.

    I wasn't aware of the adjustment period when I was researching switching to UVB. I can see him on my camera coming out periodically during the day, so I figured he was getting UVB. He really doesn't come out that much though, I guess he is still getting used to the light. Should I supplement with D3 a little still?
    Likes Elizabeth Freer liked this post

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    I know that there is a lot of information about how stressed leopard geckos get, but I find them to be quite resilient. It's true that they may not eat for a few days (or more) after being introduced to a new situation. However, many of my geckos who have been in their familiar environments for years have periods where they don't eat. In my opinion, do what's going to work best for you; the gecko will cope either way.

    Aliza

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    Zoo Med's Reptivite contains vitamin A acetate (retinol). Retinol is especially important for eye & skin health. Last I checked Herptivite ONLY contains vitamin A in the form of beta carotene. I recommend adding Zoo Med's Reptivite multivitamins withOUT D3 to your leo's current supplement schedule. The Reptile Supply Co (916-226-4089) based in California carries Zoo Med's Reptivite withOUT D3.

    Whichever move-in route you choose this info is vital, especially for a growing leopard gecko.

    Did you notice this advice regarding vitamin D3 backup doses even when your young leo is taking advantage of UVB:
    ***** When your leopard gecko is taking advantage of appropriate UVB rays, Dr. Fran Baines DVM strongly recommends a backup dose of powdered D3 @ 1-2 feedings per month! Just substitute 1 D3 calcium dusting for 1 plain calcium dusting during those 1-2 weeks only. *****

    Here is UVB Schedule 154 and non-UVB Schedule 124.
    Supplement Schedule with UVB:

    UVB Weekly Schedule 154 for Leopard Geckos 0-12 months old
    (with UVB)

    ***** It's crucial for your leopard gecko to have an enclosure larger than a 10 gallon (20 x 10.5 x 12 inches tall) prior to experimenting with UVB. There are downsides to UVB too.

    A 20 long: 30 x 12 x 12 inches tall IS the bare minimum enclosure size when providing UVB for any leopard gecko! A leo will need at least 3 hides to dodge the rays when he feels the urge. *****

    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) symptoms include uneven (lopsided) gait, walking on one or both "elbows", bowed limbs, belly dragging, and an underbite. Difficulty chewing should be closely monitored.
    A Ferguson Zone Index of 0.5-1.0 is required at the leopard gecko's basking site!
    The Reptile Supply Company based in Lodi, California stocks Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3.
    During this time your leopard gecko will be transitioning from daily feeding to feeding 3x per week. This all depends upon how fast your leo grows!

    Feed lightly dusted prey 3x per week only.


    • Monday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's Reptivite multivitamins withOUT D3
    • Tuesday > > mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting
    • Wednesday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with pure precipitated calcium carbonate withOUT D3 (Zoo Med's Repti Calcium or NOW's human-grade pure calcium carbonate)
    • Thursday > > mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting
    • Friday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with pure precipitated calcium carbonate withOUT D3 (Zoo Med's Repti Calcium or NOW's human-grade pure calcium carbonate)
    • Saturday > > mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting
    • Sunday > > no food or free choice > > no dusting


    ***** When your leopard gecko is taking advantage of appropriate UVB rays, Dr. Fran Baines DVM strongly recommends a backup dose of powdered D3 @ 1-2 feedings per month! Just substitute 1 D3 calcium dusting for 1 plain calcium dusting during those 1-2 weeks only. *****


    For link 154 click: UVB Weekly Feeding & Supplement Schedule 154 for leopard geckos 0-12 months old

    Supplement Schedule withOUT UVB:

    Weekly Schedule 124 for Leopard Geckos 0-12 months old
    (withOUT UVB)
    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) symptoms include uneven (lopsided) gait, walking on one or both "elbows", bowed limbs, belly dragging, and an underbite. Difficulty chewing should be closely monitored.
    The Reptile Supply Company based in Lodi, California stocks Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3.
    During this time your leopard gecko will be transitioning from daily feeding to feeding 3x per week. This all depends upon how fast your leo grows!

    Feed lightly dusted prey 3x per week.

    • Monday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's Repti Calcium with D3
    • Tuesday > > mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting
    • Wednesday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with pure precipitated calcium carbonate withOUT D3 (Zoo Med's Repti Calcium or NOW's human-grade pure calcium carbonate)
    • Thursday > > mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting
    • Friday > > crickets or dubia lightly dusted with Zoo Med's ReptiVite multivitamins withOUT D3
    • Saturday > > mealworms, superworms, or black soldier fly larvae (Phoenix worms) > > no dusting
    • Sunday > > no food or free choice > > no dusting



    For link 124 click: Weekly Feeding & Supplement Schedule 124 for leopard geckos 0-12 months old
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 04-25-2021 at 01:34 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    What diet do you feed your leo's bugs & worms?
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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    I mainly feed mealworms, but I do feed dubia roaches some. Lately he hasn't wanted dubias though. I don't do crickets because I didn't like leaving them unattended in his tank.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth Freer View Post
    What diet do you feed your leo's bugs & worms?
    This was a ? about the diet you feed to your feeders prior to feeding them to your leo. We are what we eat.

    Quote Originally Posted by vince51893 View Post
    I mainly feed mealworms, but I do feed dubia roaches some. Lately he hasn't wanted dubias though. I don't do crickets because I didn't like leaving them unattended in his tank.
    I snip the back legs off crickets at their "knees". Then I place the crickets in an 8 oz clear glass storage container from Walmart. I use a slanted stone ramp to help my leo reach the crickets.


    Feeding dubia & keeping mealworms on a nutritional bedding works well for your leo. Wheat germ, wheat bran, & oats contain excessive phosphorus.

    Here's a healthy diet/bedding for mealworms/superworms and bugs too! After you get mealworms, replace the bedding they come in with already ground Professional Reptiles' Pro Gutload (1-775-359-1085). Keep your mealworms at room temperature & in 6 quart plastic Sterilite tubs with bedding & ventilation, NOT in the refrigerator.


    \/ \/ \/
    In addition to a balanced dry diet to cover the basics, offer your geckos' feeders some veggies and fruits from these lists.
    Gutload Ingredients for Bugs & Worms . . . . . . thanks to Olimpia -- August 2013

    "A commercial gut loading food like Bug Burger or Superload (both by Repashy), Cricket Crack, Dinofuel, etc. is going to make your life easier AND provide a nutritious diet to your crickets at the same time. Avoid Fluker's gutloads, as they are super feeble in their formulas.

    "If you opt for making your own gutload at home, here's a list of great ingredients to use:
    BEST: mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion flowers & leaves, collard greens, escarole lettuce, papaya, watercress, and alfalfa.
    GOOD: sweet potato, carrots, (oranges), mango, butternut squash, kale, apples, beet greens, blackberries, bok choy, and green beans.
    DRY FOOD: bee pollen, organic non-salted sunflower seeds, spirulina, dried seaweed, flax seed, and organic non-salted almonds.
    AVOID AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE: potatoes, cabbage, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, corn, grains, beans, oats, bread, cereal, meat, eggs, dog food, cat food, fish food, canned or dead insects, vertebrates."
    Last edited by Elizabeth Freer; 04-25-2021 at 10:56 AM.
    "If you can hear crickets, it's still summer." ;)

    "May the peace that
    You find at the beach
    Follow you home"

    Click: Leo Care Sheet's Table of Contents

    ===> No plain calcium, calcium with D3, or multivitamins inside an enclosure <===

    Oedura castelnaui ~ Lepidodactylus lugubris ~ Phelsuma barbouri ~ Ptychozoon kuhli ~ Cyrtodactylus peguensis zebraicus ~ Phyllurus platurus ~ Eublepharis macularius ~ Correlophus ciliatus ~ (L kimhowelli) ~ (P tigrinus) ~ (P klemmeri) ~ (H garnotii)

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