pictus vs picta

chuckpowell

New member
It depends on the gender of the genus name: pictus is masculine and picta is femine. Since Paroedura ends with an "a" I'm guess its femine. In which case it'd be Paroedura picta. Masculine names usually don't end in an "a". But that's just a guess of the generic names gender - you'd have to look it up. Masculine would be Paroedura pictus, femine would be Paroedura picta.

Best,

Chuck

darth_gecko said:
what the diffrence between picta and pitus?
 

chuckpowell

New member
Guess I didn't explain it very well. Generic names are masculine, femine, or neutral. That is the NAME is either refers to a male, a female, or the name is without sex. The name, not the animal. The gender of the species name has to match the gender of the genus name. I don't know what gender the genus Paroedura is. ASSUMING the genus is masculine then the species has to be masculine also and it would be pictus. If you assume the genus name is female then the species name has to match and the animal is called Paroedura picta. The spelling of the genus name never changes, but the gender of the genus name needs to match the gender of the species name. I hope that helps explain it a bit better.

Best,

Chuck
 

chuckpowell

New member
If your really really interested here is the section from the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature:
31.2. Agreement in gender. A species-group name, if it is or ends in a Latin or latinized adjective or participle in the nominative singular, must agree in gender with the generic name with which it is at any time combined.

31.2.1. A species-group name that is a simple or compound noun (or noun phrase) in apposition need not agree in gender with the generic name with which it is combined (the original spelling is to be retained, with gender ending unchanged; see Article 34.2.1).

Examples. The specific name in Simia diana (Simia and diana both feminine) remains unchanged in Cercopithecus diana (Cercopithecus masculine); and the noun phrases in Melanoplus femurrubrum (Melanoplus masculine; but rubrum agreeing with femur, neuter) and Desmometopa m-nigrum (Desmometopa feminine; nigrum neuter, agreeing with m, because letters of the alphabet are neuter).
31.2.2. Where the author of a species-group name did not indicate whether he or she regarded it as a noun or as an adjective, and where it may be regarded as either and the evidence of usage is not decisive, it is to be treated as a noun in apposition to the name of its genus (the original spelling is to be retained, with gender ending unchanged; see Article 34.2.1).

Example. Species-group names ending in -fer and -ger may be either nouns in apposition, or adjectives in the masculine gender. Cephenemyia phobifer (Clark) has often been used as C. phobifera, but the original binomen was Oestrus phobifer; since Oestrus is masculine, phobifer in that binomen may be either a masculine adjective or a noun in apposition; hence it is to be treated as a noun in apposition and not changed when combined with the feminine generic name Cephenemyia.
31.2.3. If a species-group name (or, in the case of a compound species-group name, its final component word) is not a Latin or latinized word [Arts. 11.2, 26], it is to be treated as indeclinable for the purposes of this Article, and need not agree in gender with the generic name with which it is combined (the original spelling is to be retained, with ending unchanged; see Article 34.2.1).

Example. Species-group names such as melas, melaina, melan; polychloros, polychloron; celebrachys; nakpo (from the Tibetan word meaning black) remain unchanged when transferred from combination with a generic name of one gender to combination with one of another gender. But melaena is a latinized adjective (derived from the Greek melaina) and must be changed when so transferred, with an appropriate Latin gender ending (-us masculine, -um neuter).

from http://www.iczn.org/iczn/index.jsp?article=69&nfv=

Best,

Chuck
 
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