Help! 2 Questions!

ZiggyGecko

New member
Hello!

I just recently joined GeckosUnlimited and was wondering if anyone can help me.
I got my new female leopard gecko two days ago and is it normal for her to not eat? She only licks the mealworms, but never actually eats them. :? Her temperatures are all set and at the right temperatures for both sides and air and she has 3 hides. She drinks, but doesn't eat, and she already pooped (a brown and white portion looking poop).

Also, all I see her do is be in her humid hide sleeping. Yesterday she was sleeping through the night as far as I know since I went to sleep at around 2am. :( Will she be more active or atleast walk around when she gets used to her new home?

Thanks!~
 

jakehinds

New member
Usually it takes them time to get used to their surroundings before being comfortable enough to be walking around outside of the hides. Are you feeding(trying) to feed her at night? I would wait a week from when you got her, and if she still isn't comfortable and is still in her humid hide, try bumping up the humidity of the overall cage. Also, what kind of lights/ heating are you using? You should have an under tank heater, and if the ambient temps. aren't getting hot enough you should have an overhead light bulb. If the cage is in your room, usually opening the blinds a bit is enough for their day/night cycle. You should be using a ceramic heat emitter, it lasts forever and doesn't put off ANY light which is good. But wait for others to respond, as I do not have a leo. Or at least yet. lol
 
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ZiggyGecko

New member
Yes, I'm trying to feed her at night, that's when she only licks the mealworms. I'm using an UTH and on the heat side the temperature is 90 F and on the cold it is 70ish F, oh and thanks, I'll try to find a ceramic heat emitter! :)
 

cricket4u

New member
Hello!

I just recently joined GeckosUnlimited and was wondering if anyone can help me.
I got my new female leopard gecko two days ago and is it normal for her to not eat? She only licks the mealworms, but never actually eats them. :? Her temperatures are all set and at the right temperatures for both sides and air and she has 3 hides. She drinks, but doesn't eat, and she already pooped (a brown and white portion looking poop).

Also, all I see her do is be in her humid hide sleeping. Yesterday she was sleeping through the night as far as I know since I went to sleep at around 2am. :( Will she be more active or atleast walk around when she gets used to her new home?

Thanks!~

Hi,

The fact that she has attempted to smell the worms leads me to believe she is interested in eating, but the worms are not active enough for her to recognize them as food. She may have only been fed crickets in the past. Try offering crickets instead.
 

Embrace Calamity

New member
Usually it takes them time to get used to their surroundings before being comfortable enough to be walking around outside of the hides. Are you feeding(trying) to feed her at night? I would wait a week from when you got her, and if she still isn't comfortable and is still in her humid hide, try bumping up the humidity of the overall cage. Also, what kind of lights/ heating are you using? You should have an under tank heater, and if the ambient temps. aren't getting hot enough you should have an overhead light bulb. If the cage is in your room, usually opening the blinds a bit is enough for their day/night cycle. You should be using a ceramic heat emitter, it lasts forever and doesn't put off ANY light which is good. But wait for others to respond, as I do not have a leo. Or at least yet. lol
Hello dear. :)

It is normal for them to not eat right away, but usually they just won't bother trying, not lick and then refuse. I would recommend trying crickets. Some geckos just don't like mealworms; crickets are a better, more nutritious food anyway. Are you dusting the mealworms? If so, what with? What are the nighttime temps (I assume you turn off the light)?

EDIT: Cricket beat me to it. OH WOE IS ME.

~Maggot
 

cricket4u

New member
Hello dear. :)

It is normal for them to not eat right away, but usually they just won't bother trying, not lick and then refuse. I would recommend trying crickets. Some geckos just don't like mealworms; crickets are a better, more nutritious food anyway. Are you dusting the mealworms? If so, what with? What are the nighttime temps (I assume you turn off the light)?

EDIT: Cricket beat me to it. OH WOE IS ME.

~Maggot

:lol: Normally you beat me to it!
 

ZiggyGecko

New member
Thanks everyone, I will try crickets! And yes I do turn the lights off at night. I dust the mealworm with Rep-Cal Phosphorus-Free Calcium with Vit.D3-A lot of people recommended that for me. The night temps drop a bit, but I do not know the exact temperature, it goes to around 83-87 at night. o-o Is that okay? I don't really mess around with it for night because people were saying that they keep their temperatures as it is.
 

Embrace Calamity

New member
Thanks everyone, I will try crickets! And yes I do turn the lights off at night. I dust the mealworm with Rep-Cal Phosphorus-Free Calcium with Vit.D3-A lot of people recommended that for me. The night temps drop a bit, but I do not know the exact temperature, it goes to around 83-87 at night. o-o Is that okay? I don't really mess around with it for night because people were saying that they keep their temperatures as it is.
The problem with the Rep-Cal is that it doesn't contain any other vitamins. Geckos do need more than just calcium and vitamin D3, which is commonly overlooked, and will result in issues in the long run. The same company produces a multivitamin called Herptivite, however, it contains only beta carotene in place of vitamin A acetate, and there is evidence to suggest that leopard geckos can't convert beta carotene into usable vitamin A as was once believed. As far as I'm aware, there isn't a multivitamin on the market that contains vitamin A acetate, which, unfortunately, makes the Rep-Cal pretty much useless. I personally always suggested Repashy Calcium Plus, which is an all-in-one supplement meant for dusting every feeding. Another option is ZooMed's Reptivite, intended to be used 2-3 times a week.

But yes, your overnight temps are fine. :) Just as long as the hot side doesn't drop below 80. The only reason I asked is that, if you feed at night but let it get cold, they can't digest their food properly - though that likely wasn't the case here anyway, since you haven't had the gecko very long. But it's worth double-checking everything.

~Maggot
 

jakehinds

New member
Shoot! Looks like everyone else beat me to it! I'm on craigslist looking for geckos, LOL. But yeah, I would suggest crickets also since they are super active.
 

Elizabeth Freer

Active member
The problem with the Rep-Cal is that it doesn't contain any other vitamins. Geckos do need more than just calcium and vitamin D3, which is commonly overlooked, and will result in issues in the long run. The same company produces a multivitamin called Herptivite, however, it contains only beta carotene in place of vitamin A acetate, and there is evidence to suggest that leopard geckos can't convert beta carotene into usable vitamin A as was once believed. As far as I'm aware, there isn't a multivitamin on the market that contains vitamin A acetate, which, unfortunately, makes the Rep-Cal pretty much useless. I personally always suggested Repashy Calcium Plus, which is an all-in-one supplement meant for dusting every feeding. Another option is ZooMed's Reptivite, intended to be used 2-3 times a week.

But yes, your overnight temps are fine. :) Just as long as the hot side doesn't drop below 80. The only reason I asked is that, if you feed at night but let it get cold, they can't digest their food properly - though that likely wasn't the case here anyway, since you haven't had the gecko very long. But it's worth double-checking everything.

~Maggot

@ EC ~ Is the bold ^ what you wished to say?

Zoo Med's Reptivite, either with or without D3, does contain vitamin A acetate.

@ ZiggyGecko ~ The cool side can dip to 70ish at night.
 
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Elizabeth Freer

Active member
ZiggyGecko ~

Let's do the Health Questionnaire just to make certain we are covering all bases. If possible, please post your replies in bold.

So, it is in everyone's best interest to please try to include as much of the information below as possible (high quality pictures are also very helpful):


General Information
Species of lizard:
Gecko's name:
Morph:
Gender:
Age:
Weight:
Total length:
Length of your reptile when you first acquired it:
Source (pet store, breeder, previous owner):
Captive bred or wild caught:

Vivarium
Enclosure dimensions (length x width x heighth):
Cage (type, size):
Substrate provided:
Types of hiding places provided:
Is there a humidity hide? location?
Please describe any other furnishings:
List recent changes in the environment, if any:

Lighting
Artificial lighting
Incandescent (“screw-in” bulbs): wattage(s):
Fluorescent (tube bulbs):

Natural lighting:
Access to ambient daylight from a distant window:

Heating
Do you have a thermometer(s) in the cage?
What type and brand of thermometer (digital with probe, temperature gun, LCD strip, analog (circle), combo digital thermometer/hygrometer, stainless steel aquarium type, other):
What is the ground temperature right on the substrate under the warm dry hide:
What is the air temperature on the warm end about 4 inches up from the ground:
What is the air temperature on the cool end about 4 inches up from the ground:
What device(s) are used to maintain the temperature (Under Tank Heater, heat light, ceramic heat emitter, Flexwatt heat tape, hot rock, other):
Ventilation space for your UTH by elevating the tank above the shelf (some UTHs come with sticky feet for the tank corners):
Are you using a thermostat(s)?
Which hide does she/he spend most of her time?
Is the temperature decreased at night? by how much?

Humidity
Is the humidity measured?
Humidity range:

Diet
Insects and worms, list type:
Regular diet fed to the insects and worms:
Are the insects and worms formally “gutloaded” 1-2 days prior to feeding off to your gecko? If so with?
How often do you feed your gecko?
Please list any supplements (with brand names) used. How are they given and how often?
What calcium brand are you using? with D3, without or both?
Is the calcium in the tank with D3 or without?
Multivitamins (include brand name)?
Please list any recent additions/changes in the diet:

General Health
If your gecko is sick, please describe the signs and how long your gecko has been showing these signs:
Is your gecko’s general activity level normal, decreased, or increased?
Is your gecko’s appetite normal, decreased, or increased?
Have you noticed any of the following?
Weight (loss or gain):
Discharge from the eyes or nose:
Increased breathing rate or effort:
Change in the droppings:
Urates
---white or yellowish:
---size of urates as compared to size of feces:
Abnormal skin color or shedding:
Parasites on the skin or in the feces:
Weakness:

Previous problems and/or illnesses:

Other Critters in Same Cage or in Household
List other animals that are kept in the same cage:
Recent acquisitions (new pets within the past 6 months):
Are any of your other pets ill?
 
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Elizabeth Freer

Active member
Thanks everyone, I will try crickets! And yes I do turn the lights off at night. I dust the mealworm with Rep-Cal Phosphorus-Free Calcium with Vit.D3-A lot of people recommended that for me. The night temps drop a bit, but I do not know the exact temperature, it goes to around 83-87 at night. o-o Is that okay? I don't really mess around with it for night because people were saying that they keep their temperatures as it is.

What are you using to measure the temps?

It is really important to have a digital thermometer with a probe. Proper temps for a leo are as important as food. Leos depend upon belly heat to digest their prey.
 
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Embrace Calamity

New member
@ EC ~ Is the bold ^ what you wished to say?

Zoo Med's Reptivite, either with or without D3, does contain vitamin A acetate.

@ ZiggyGecko ~ The cool side can dip to 70ish at night.
Yes? I wouldn't consider that a multivitamin to be used in conjunction with RepCal with D3, since it also contains calcium, with or without D3. Herptivite is what I would consider a multivitamin, but that doesn't contain vitamin A acetate. Two sentences later, I said: "Another option is ZooMed's Reptivite, intended to be used 2-3 times a week."

I also wouldn't be terribly concerned about the cool side temps at night. If it's too cold, the gecko just won't go there. As long as the warm side temps are fine and the gecko has the option to stay warm, what harm will it do if it drops to 65 on the cool side?

~Maggot
 

Thin Lizzy

New member
Just another thought, aside from what's already been mentioned. Depending on where you got your Gecko, it may be used to a different feeding schedule. I believe the lad I got my guy from always fed him first thing in the morning, now that's what he's used to so that's when he's most interested in feeding. I don't think it's a bad thing as he gets to lay his belly on the warm slate all day long and digest.
 

Elizabeth Freer

Active member
Yes? I wouldn't consider that a multivitamin to be used in conjunction with RepCal with D3, since it also contains calcium, with or without D3. Herptivite is what I would consider a multivitamin, but that doesn't contain vitamin A acetate. Two sentences later, I said: "Another option is ZooMed's Reptivite, intended to be used 2-3 times a week."

I also wouldn't be terribly concerned about the cool side temps at night. If it's too cold, the gecko just won't go there. As long as the warm side temps are fine and the gecko has the option to stay warm, what harm will it do if it drops to 65 on the cool side?

~Maggot

One vitamin/calcium scenario that I have been recommending for awhile goes like this:

Lightly dust only:
2x per week with the Zoo Med Reptivite with D3/vitamin A acetate

OR

1x per week with the Reptivite with D3/vitamin A acetate
1x per week with a vitamin D3 containing calcium carbonate

Plus a very small bottle cap of plain calcium in the tank 24/7 just for back up

Does that make sense? Light dusting with a vitamin D3 containing supplement 2x per week is very good.

A leo hunting for crickets in the middle of the night could feasibly go anywhere he can. Cool side temps at night are recommended to not go much below 7Oish with the UTH on 24/7.
 
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Embrace Calamity

New member
One vitamin/calcium scenario that I have been recommending for awhile goes like this:

Lightly dust only:
2x per week with the Zoo Med Reptivite with D3/vitamin A acetate

OR

1x per week with the Reptivite with D3/vitamin A acetate
1x per week with a vitamin D3 containing calcium carbonate

Plus a very small bottle cap of plain calcium in the tank 24/7 just for back up

Does that make sense? Light dusting with a vitamin D3 containing supplement 2x per week is very good.
What's the point of using two different ones, especially if only one contains vitamin A? By doing that, you're decreasing the amount of vitamin A they would be getting by 1/3-1/2 (in comparison to using just the Reptivite 2-3 times a week), which, frankly, doesn't sound like a good idea.

Plus, with the variance of how much calcium and D3 are in different supplements, you could be giving them too much or too little by mixing them. Recommending mixing one supplement with a random other supplement to an arbitrarily defined "once per week" amount doesn't sound like a good idea either.
A leo hunting for crickets in the middle of the night could feasibly go anywhere he can. Cool side temps at night are recommended to not go much below 7Oish with the UTH on 24/7.
Will spending a minute or two in temps below 70 really hurt them?

~Maggot
 

cricket4u

New member
Will spending a minute or two in temps below 70 really hurt them?

~Maggot

Think of us running outside in the middle of winter with no coat on.:biggrin: Most of the time we get away with it, but once in a while we develop a cold. Best to think prevention and avoid possibilities.

Just sharing the directions on the back of Reptivite's bottle.

Insectivores: Place crickets in a plastic bag along with a small amount of Reptivite and shake to "dust" crickets with powder. Feed approximately 12 dusted crickets per week for every 2.5 ounces (71 grams) of body weight.

The problem some people have including myself with these supplements is these companies are not taking in consideration the nutrients provided by gut loading. Obviously if you are properly gut loading to balance the feeder and you also cover each insect in dust, chances are you will end up with excess.
 
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